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Three opportunities of Digital Transformation: AI, IoT and Blockchain

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Koomey's law This law posits that the energy efficiency of computation doubles roughly every one-and-a-half years (see Figure 1–7). In other words, the energy necessary for the same amount of computation halves in that time span. To visualize the exponential impact this has, consider the face that a fully charged MacBook Air, when applying the energy efficiency of computation of 1992, would completely drain its battery in a mere 1.5 seconds. According to Koomey's law, the energy requirements for computation in embedded devices is shrinking to the point that harvesting the required energy from ambient sources like solar power and thermal energy should suffice to power the computation necessary in many applications. Metcalfe's law This law has nothing to do with chips, but all to do with connectivity. Formulated by Robert Metcalfe as he invented Ethernet, the law essentially states that the value of a network increases exponentially with regard to the number of its nodes (see Figure 1–8).


Study Shows Robots Using Internet-Based AI Exhibit Racist And Sexist Tendencies

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A new study claims robots exhibit racist and sexist stereotyping when the artificial intelligence (AI) that powers them is modeled on data from the internet. The study, which researchers say is the first to prove the concept, was led by Johns Hopkins University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and the University of Washington, and published by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). Researchers will be initially presenting their findings at the 2022 Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency, which is being held in South Korea. This isn't the first time exposure to the internet has left AI with bigoted views. Back in 2016, Microsoft launched an AI named Tay.


MIT engineers build LEGO-like AI chip - Electronic Products & Technology

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Imagine a more sustainable future, where cellphones, smartwatches, and other wearable devices don't have to be shelved or discarded for a newer model. Instead, they could be upgraded with the latest sensors and processors that would snap onto a device's internal chip -- like LEGO bricks incorporated into an existing build. Such reconfigurable chipware could keep devices up to date while reducing our electronic waste. Now engineers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge MA, have taken a step toward that modular vision with a LEGO-like design for a stackable, reconfigurable artificial intelligence chip. The design comprises alternating layers of sensing and processing elements, along with light-emitting diodes (LED) that allow for the chip's layers to communicate optically.


5G and AI use cases – how 5G lifts artificial intelligence - Information Age

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But how will AI and 5G most affect our everyday business lives? What are 5G and AI use cases? Convergence makes 5G and AI use cases exciting: 5G could unleash the artificial intelligence revolution, moving it into a different league and creating new AI use cases. When Apple launched the iPhone, few people understood its significance. There was a reason for this.


Difference Between Agent-Based and Network-Based Internal Vulnerability Scanning

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For years, the two most popular methods for internal scanning: agent-based and network-based were considered to be about equal in value, each bringing its own strengths to bear. However, with remote working now the norm in most if not all workplaces, it feels a lot more like agent-based scanning is a must, while network-based scanning is an optional extra. This article will go in-depth on the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, but let's wind it back a second for those who aren't sure why they should even do internal scanning in the first place. While external vulnerability scanning can give a great overview of what you look like to a hacker, the information that can be gleaned without access to your systems can be limited. Some serious vulnerabilities can be discovered at this stage, so it's a must for many organizations, but that's not where hackers stop.


Voilà AI Artist is the internet craze that turns people into cartoons

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If you've spent any time at all scrolling through your social feeds of late, you might have seen pictures of some of your friends and family looking very cartoonish. The likelihood is that they have downloaded an app called Voilà AI Artist, which uses an existing photo of a person and animates the image to make it look like something you'd see in a Pixar film. Voilà AI Artist is a photo editing app which can be used on iOS and Android. Once it's downloaded, the user can upload a pic of a face, or use the app to capture a pic of a face, and then the app does its thing. Users can select between 3D cartoon, 2d cartoon, caricatures and, if they are feeling high-brow, renaissance painting.


Port of Tyne lands BT 5G private network to boost smart port ambitions

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Hot on the heels of forging a partnership with Ericsson to provide commercial 5G private networks for the UK market, BT is to install a new 5G private network and other surveillance and smart technology to enable the Port of Tyne to advance its ambition to become a world-class "smart port". The Port of Tyne is one of the UK's major deep-sea ports – operating in bulk and conventional cargo, car terminals, cruise and ferry, and port-centric logistics and estates. Entirely self-financing, it receives no government funding, is run on a commercial basis and reinvests all profits back into the port for the benefit of all of its stakeholders. During a decade of development, the Port of Tyne has invested more than £130m in diversifying its operations to handle a growing range of commodities. Building on the port's in-house capability – the 2050 Maritime Innovation Hub – the Port of Tyne is now implementing a new hybrid fibre, 4G and 5G private network to build a future-proofed digital technology infrastructure.


Engineers build LEGO-like artificial intelligence chip

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Imagine a more sustainable future, where cellphones, smartwatches, and other wearable devices don't have to be shelved or discarded for a newer model. Instead, they could be upgraded with the latest sensors and processors that would snap onto a device's internal chip -- like LEGO bricks incorporated into an existing build. Such reconfigurable chipware could keep devices up to date while reducing our electronic waste. Now MIT engineers have taken a step toward that modular vision with a LEGO-like design for a stackable, reconfigurable artificial intelligence chip. The design comprises alternating layers of sensing and processing elements, along with light-emitting diodes (LED) that allow for the chip's layers to communicate optically.


Europe's Only Deeptech Demo Day: Deeptech Labs' Unveil 6 New Accelerator Start-ups

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Deeptech Labs, the accelerator and VC fund for post-Seed, pre-Series A deeptech companies will unveil its Spring cohort of 6 deeptech start-ups to an online audience of investors on 21st June. More than 120 VCs and Corporate Entities have previously attended its virtual demo days, demonstrating the significant and growing interest in the European deeptech sector. Deeptech Labs is a Cambridge-based accelerator programme and VC fund, founded in 2020 by ARM, Cambridge Innovation Capital, Martlet Capital, Ewan Kirk and the University of Cambridge. The accelerator supports deeptech entrepreneurs as they move from prototype and proof of concept to scalable products and services, and connects them to Deeptech Labs' extensive network of deeptech investors. The Deeptech Labs accelerator programme and investment fund was founded to fill a significant gap in the European venture market and accelerate the growth of promising early-stage deeptech companies.


Engineers Build LEGO-like Artificial Intelligence Chip - AI Summary

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Instead, they could be upgraded with the latest sensors and processors that would snap onto a device's internal chip -- like LEGO bricks incorporated into an existing build. "As we enter the era of the internet of things based on sensor networks, demand for multifunctioning edge-computing devices will expand dramatically," says Jeehwan Kim, associate professor of mechanical engineering at MIT. In addition to Kim and Kang, MIT authors include co-first authors Chanyeol Choi, Hyunseok Kim, and Min-Kyu Song, and contributing authors Hanwool Yeon, Celesta Chang, Jun Min Suh, Jiho Shin, Kuangye Lu, Bo-In Park, Yeongin Kim, Han Eol Lee, Doyoon Lee, Subeen Pang, Sang-Hoon Bae, Hun S. Kum, and Peng Lin, along with collaborators from Harvard University, Tsinghua University, Zhejiang University, and elsewhere. Another idea, he adds, is for modular chips, built into electronics, that consumers can choose to build up with the latest sensor and processor "bricks." "We could make different types of neural networks, like for image or voice recognition, and let the customer choose what they want, and add to an existing chip like a LEGO."