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AI, 5G, and IoT top the list of the most important technologies for 2021

#artificialintelligence

The most important technologies in 2021 will be AI, 5G, and IoT, according to a newly released global survey of CIOs and CTOs by the technical professional organization IEEE. More specifically, nearly one-third (32%) of respondents cited AI and machine learning, followed by 5G (20%), and IoT (14%). Manufacturing (19%), healthcare (18%), financial services (15%), and education (13%) are the industries that most believe will be impacted by technology in 2021, according to CIOs and CTOS surveyed. It's no surprise that COVID-19 has upended organizations, observed Carmen Fontana, an IEEE member and cloud and emerging technology lead at Centric Consulting. SEE: CompTIA's 10 trends for 2021.


Burn Off That Turkey With These Cyber Monday Fitness Deals

WIRED

A fitness tracker can tell you a lot about your body these days. The best of them help you plan and keep track of your workouts, whether you're trail running in the woods or circuit training in your apartment's basement gym. We have a few more smartwatch deals in our Cyber Monday phone and gadget deals guide. This watch can track workouts and help plan your hiking routes. It runs Google's Wear OS platform, which supports iOS but is particularly suited for those with Android phones.


Burn Off That Turkey With These Cyber Monday Fitness Deals

WIRED

A fitness tracker can tell you a lot about your body these days. The best of them help you plan and keep track of your workouts, whether you're trail running in the woods or circuit training in your apartment's basement gym. We have a few more smartwatch deals in our Cyber Monday phone and gadget deals guide. This watch can track workouts and help plan your hiking routes. It runs Google's Wear OS platform, which supports iOS but is particularly suited for those with Android phones.


Facebook Proposes Free-Viewpoint Rendering on Monocular Video

#artificialintelligence

Just a few months after Facebook released an on-device model capable of turning common two-dimensional photos into 3D images comes a new and improved model, produced in cooperation with Cornell Tech and Virginia Tech, that enables free-viewpoint rendering of dynamic scenes in a single video. Typical 3D reconstruction algorithms require multiple cameras to capture different viewpoints, necessitating a complicated hardware setup. Some recent video depth estimation approaches have managed to acquire consistent per-frame depth estimates from a single video using scene depth estimates and view synthesis, but the team says even with perfect depth estimates, these early-stage approaches can lead to unnatural stretches and reveal holes in disoccluded regions. The Facebook approach enables free-viewpoint rendering by learning a spatiotemporal neural irradiance field -- a challenging task given that the input video contains only one viewpoint of the scene at any given moment. For continuous representations of a scene without resolution loss, the researchers used neural implicit representations to aggregate all dynamic scene spatiotemporal aspects into a single global representation. Rather than modelling view dependency, the researchers trained the neural irradiance fields as a function of both space and time for each video.


Imaging AI and Machine Learning -- Beyond the Hype, Upcoming Webinar Ho

#artificialintelligence

For the first 125 years of medical imaging, technological advances focused primarily on new modes of imaging as technology progressed from the discovery of the X-ray in 1895 to ultrasounds, MRIs, PET and CT scans in the late 20th century. Now, arguably, the most notable advances are being made in how images from those technologies are securely shared, managed, stored and assessed. These advancements are largely due to the application of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) to imaging systems and data platforms. Automation is improving virtually every stage of the imaging workflow, but there is a lot of hype concerning AI and ML in the marketplace. Companies have underestimated the challenge that complexity presents, and predictions of the end of radiologists have proven false multiple times.


Coding the future: the tech kids solving life's problems

The Guardian

I started getting interested in coding when I was about 11. I joined a local community lab where biologists and computer scientists come together and conduct experiments. I wanted to join the lab because my brother was really into biology and at the time I wanted to be exactly like him. I was too young to participate in the experiments, so my mentor pushed me more towards coding. Then a couple of years ago my mum had a third-degree heart block and had to go to hospital where she was hooked up to so many different wires to monitor her health.


2021 Healthcare Cybersecurity Priorities: Experts Weigh In

#artificialintelligence

Healthcare cybersecurity is in triage mode. As systems are stretched to the limits by COVID-19 and technology becomes an essential part of everyday patient interactions, hospital and healthcare IT departments have been left to figure out how to make it all work together, safely and securely. Most notably, the connectivity of everything from thermometers to defibrillators is exponentially increasing the attack surface, presenting vulnerabilities IT professionals might not even know are on their networks. Get the whole story and DOWNLOAD the eBook now – on us!] The result has been a newfound attention from ransomware and other malicious actors circling and waiting for the right time to strike. Rather than feeling overwhelmed in the current cybersecurity environment, it's important for healthcare and hospital IT teams to look at security their networks as a constant work in progress, rather than a single project with a start and end point, according to experts Jeff Horne from Ordr and G. Anthony Reina who participated in Threatpost's November webinar on Heathcare Cybersecurity. "This is a proactive space," Reina said. "This is something where you can't just be reactive. You actually have to be going out there, searching for those sorts of things, and so even on the technologies that we have, you know, we're, we're proactive about saying that security is an evolving, you know, kind of technology, It's not something where we're going to be finished." Healthcare IT pros, and security professionals more generally, also need to get a firm handle on what lives their networks and its potential level of exposure. The fine-tuned expertise of healthcare connected machines, along with the enormous cost to upgrade hardware in many instances, leave holes on a network that simply cannot be patched. "Because, from an IT perspective, you cannot manage what you can't see, and from a security perspective, you can't control and protect what you don't know," Horne said. Threatpost's experts explained how healthcare organizations can get out of triage mode and ahead of the next attack. The webinar covers everything from bread and butter patching to a brand-new secure data model which applies federated learning to functions as critical as diagnosing a brain tumor. Alternatively, a lightly edited transcript of the event follows below. Thank you so much for joining. We have an excellent conversation planned on a critically important topic, Healthcare cybersecurity. My name is Becky Bracken, I'll be your host for today's discussion. Before we get started, I want to remind you there's a widget on the upper right-hand corner of your screen where you can submit questions to our panelists at any time. We encourage you to do that. You'll have to answer questions and we want to make sure we're covering topics most interesting to you, OK, sure. Let's just introduce our panelists today. First we have Jeff Horne. Jeff is currently the CSO at Ordr and his priors include SpaceX.


Cyber Monday weekend is here: All the best deals to shop right now

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

These early Cyber Monday 2020 price drops on the Amazon Fire stick, Apple AirPods are more are some of the best we've seen—shop our top picks.


Driving business opportunities at the Edge - TechHQ

#artificialintelligence

Edge computing presents organizations with a significant leap in business opportunity. Much has been written about the benefits of the Internet of Things (IoT), but it is now clear that these benefits can only be truly realized with Edge computing. Limiting your organization to only adopting central cloud computing simply won't support your future IoT needs. Today, every organization needs to be a digital organization, powered by data, running in a multi-cloud world. Recognizing that multi-cloud actually begins at the point of data creation – the Edge – the value in the future is in combining Edge computing with IoT.


2021 will see the spread of AI and automation in the workplace

#artificialintelligence

Businesses are always looking to optimize and streamline services to cut costs. The coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic calamity caused by it have put even more pressure on enterprises to innovate and do more with less. Andy Watson, senior vice president for Asia, Pacific, Japan, and Greater China at SAP Concur, says many organizations will turn to automation and AI in 2021 as a way to address key business pain points and simplify cumbersome processes. "Automation will become essential, not extra. As businesses maintain hybrid remote-working models and anticipate other potential disruptions in 2021 and beyond, the role of automation and AI use cases in the workplace will grow," Watson said in an email interview. "These may include enabling efficient day-to-day communications between knowledge workers doing their jobs from home and automating invoicing and expenses to keep valued partners paid and to preserve budgets."