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The race to put cars in the cloud is … confusing

ZDNet

Back in 2018, Elon Musk's SpaceX put the first car in space. A flurry of press releases suggest that the (surely simpler?) race to put cars -- and carmakers -- into the cloud is far from over. Last week, Volkswagen Group jumped into Microsoft's Azure cloud to "accelerate the development of automated driving." But the company is also a fan of Amazon Web Services (AWS) and previously announced a relationship with Azure back in 2018. Earlier this month, Ford picked Google as its preferred (but not only) cloud.


Ford, Google deal means car tech upgrades for drivers: Google apps in the vehicle

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Ford Motor Co. and Google announced a strategic partnership on Monday that's meant to more quickly modernize the 117-year-old automaker in unique ways and more aggressively use data to drive revenue and improve customer experience. Ford will start exploring this year the use of technology to provide oversight and quality control of factory robotics as well as additional training of United Auto Workers members on the plant floors, while Ford and Lincoln customers will start seeing new driver experiences in the 2023 calendar year. What does this all mean? Ford and Lincoln drivers will have access to voice technology, like Google Assistant, allowing them to keep their eyes on the road and hands on the wheel while multitasking. And Google Maps offers information on real-time traffic, automatic rerouting and lane guidance.


Apple Car speculation is back. Here's what we know so far

CNN Top Stories

New York (CNN Business)Longstanding speculation that Apple will release its own electric, self-driving car was reignited last week when Reuters, citing unnamed sources, reported that Apple plans to produce a passenger vehicle by 2024. Talk of the iPhone maker's ambitions to break into the auto industry has been swirling for about five years. Expectations for the effort, named Project Titan, range from the company developing its own Apple-branded car to providing operating system software to existing car manufacturers. In April 2017, Apple received a permit from the California Department of Motor Vehicles to test self-driving vehicles there. An Apple car has the potential to be "a transformative event" for the automobile and mobility industry in the coming decades, Morgan Stanley analysts wrote in a note to investors last week -- much as the iPhone changed the game for mobile phones.


Top 40 Voice AI Influencers to Follow on Twitter

#artificialintelligence

The voice-first community on social media continues to grow almost as quickly as the adoption of voice AI technology itself. In 2018, we identified 15 voice AI influencers to follow on Twitter and heard from a lot of our readers on how much they loved the list--an inspiring mix of engineers, entrepreneurs, academics, linguists and journalists. Two years later, we're updating our list to include 40 experts we recommend you follow to keep up with the latest in voice AI news, trends, predictions, and successes. As we are all in planning mode for 2021, we thought this would be a good time to publish a new list to help inspire you. If you know someone who should be included in our next list, please let us know.)


AWS, BlackBerry partner to development Ivy, BlackBerry's automotive data platform

ZDNet

Amazon Web Services announced Tuesday that it has inked a multi-year partnership with BlackBerry to develop and market Ivy, BlackBerry's in-vehicle data platform. BlackBerry's Ivy platform aims to offer automakers a standardized way to read vehicle sensor data and analyze it for personalized in-vehicle services. It builds on the capabilities of BlackBerry's QNX platform, its safety-certified embedded OS, as well as AWS' portfolio of IoT and machine learning capabilities. BlackBerry Ivy will support multiple vehicle operating systems and multi-cloud deployments. The system will run on the edge, inside a vehicle's embedded systems, but will be managed and configured from the cloud, the companies said.


How Voice AI is Disrupting Industries: Recap of a VUX World Podcast Episode

#artificialintelligence

A recent VUX World podcast took a deep dive into how voice AI is disrupting multiple industries. Special guest, Mike Zagorsek, VP of product marketing at SoundHound Inc. spoke with hosts Kane Simms and Dustin Coates of VUX World about the Houndify Voice AI platform. He highlighted how some of our partners (Mercedes-Benz, Pandora, and Mastercard) are using voice to create deeper relationships with their customers and extending the functionality and convenience of their products and services. The following is a recap of some of that conversation. You can watch and listen to the podcast in its entirety here.


How AI will revolutionize manufacturing

#artificialintelligence

Ask Stefan Jockusch what a factory might look like in 10 or 20 years, and the answer might leave you at a crossroads between fascination and bewilderment. Jockusch is vice president for strategy at Siemens Digital Industries Software, which develops applications that simulate the conception, design, and manufacture of products like cell phones or smart watches. His vision of a smart factory is abuzz with "independent, moving" robots. This podcast episode was produced by Insights, the custom content arm of MIT Technology Review. It was not produced by MIT Technology Review's editorial staff. "Depending on what product I throw at this factory, it will completely reshuffle itself and work differently when I come in with a very different product," Jockusch says. "It will self-organize itself to do something different." Behind this factory of the future is artificial intelligence (AI), Jockusch says in this episode of Business Lab. But AI starts much, much smaller, with the chip.


Video Chatbots to Replace Humans

#artificialintelligence

The videos i this article will blow your mind... and they are already out of date. Soul Machines is on the cutting edge of building commercial AI avatars that can appear on a computer screen, and even in 3D, to simulate face-to-face engagement. The face in the main image of this article is one of their 3D avatars and they are already being deployed in banks and energy companies to inform and serve customers. With names such as Jamie (ANZ Bank), Will (Vector Energy), Ava (Autodesk), and Sarah (Daimler Mercedes Benz), they are connecting with customers, replicating human emotion, providing the right answers and asking insightful questions. Many call centre workers in affluent countries have been'off-shored' to lower cost countries, and now those roles are set to be outsourced to AI bots.


How AI will revolutionize manufacturing

#artificialintelligence

Ask Stefan Jockusch what a factory might look like in 10 or 20 years, and the answer might leave you at a crossroads between fascination and bewilderment. Jockusch is vice president for strategy at Siemens Digital Industries Software, which develops applications that simulate the conception, design, and manufacture of products like cell phones or smart watches. His vision of a smart factory is abuzz with "independent, moving" robots. This podcast episode was produced by Insights, the custom content arm of MIT Technology Review. It was not produced by MIT Technology Review's editorial staff. "Depending on what product I throw at this factory, it will completely reshuffle itself and work differently when I come in with a very different product," Jockusch says. "It will self-organize itself to do something different." Behind this factory of future is artificial intelligence (AI), Jockusch says in this episode of Business Lab. But AI starts much, much smaller, with the chip.


Buying a new car? These tech features could drive your choice

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

What do automotive shoppers really want? A few years ago, those who kicked the tires on new vehicles might have prioritized fuel efficiency, comfort, or perhaps horsepower. "The race never ends to develop'must have' vehicle technologies," says Kristin Kolodge, executive director of driver interaction and human machine interface research at J.D. Power. "New technology continues to be a primary factor in the vehicle purchase decision." "However, it's critical for automakers to offer features that owners find intuitive and reliable," Kolodge adds.