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Why Some Instagram And Facebook Filters Can't Be Used In Texas After Lawsuit

International Business Times

Instagram and Facebook users in Texas lost access to certain augmented reality filters Wednesday, following a lawsuit accusing parent company Meta of violating privacy laws. In February, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton revealed he would sue Meta for using facial recognition in filters to collect data for commercial purposes without consent. Paxton claimed Meta was "storing millions of biometric identifiers" that included voiceprints, retina or iris scans, and hand and face geometry. Although Meta argued it does not use facial recognition technology, it has disabled its AR filters and avatars on Facebook and Instagram amid the litigation. The AR effects featured on Facebook, Messenger, Messenger Kids, and Portal will also be shut down for Texas users.


Texas sues Meta, saying it misused facial recognition data

NPR Technology

FILE photo - Texas sued Meta on Monday over misuse of biometric data, the latest round of litigation between governments and the company over privacy. FILE photo - Texas sued Meta on Monday over misuse of biometric data, the latest round of litigation between governments and the company over privacy. Texas sued Facebook parent company Meta for exploiting the biometric data of millions of people in the state - including those who used the platform and those who did not. The company, according to a suit filed by state Attorney General Ken Paxton, violated state privacy laws and should be responsible for billions of dollars in damages. The suit involves Facebook's "tag suggestions" feature, which the company ended last year, that used facial recognition to encourage users to link the photo to a friend's profile.


Texas sues Meta over Facebook's facial recognition practices

Al Jazeera

The Texas attorney general is suing Facebook parent Meta, saying the United States company has unlawfully collected biometric data on Texans for commercial purposes, without their informed consent. Attorney General Ken Paxton filed the lawsuit Monday in state district court, claiming Meta has been "storing millions of biometric identifiers" -- identified as retina or iris scans, voiceprints, or a record of hand and face geometry -- contained in photos and videos people upload to its services, including Facebook and Instagram. "Facebook will no longer take advantage of people and their children with the intent to turn a profit at the expense of one's safety and well-being," Paxton said in a statement. "This is yet another example of Big Tech's deceitful business practices and it must stop. I will continue to fight for Texans' privacy and security."


Meta Illegally Collected Facial Recognition Data on Texans, Lawsuit Alleges

TIME - Tech

The Texas Attorney General is suing Facebook parent Meta, saying the company has unlawfully collected biometric data on Texans for commercial purposes, without their informed consent. Attorney General Ken Paxton filed the lawsuit Monday a state district court claiming Meta has been "storing millions of biometric identifiers" -- identified as retina or iris scans, voice prints, or a record of hand and face geometry -- contained in photos and videos people upload to its services, including Facebook and Instagram. "Facebook will no longer take advantage of people and their children with the intent to turn a profit at the expense of one's safety and well-being," Paxton said in a statement. "This is yet another example of Big Tech's deceitful business practices and it must stop. I will continue to fight for Texans' privacy and security."


Texas sues Meta over the facial recognition system it shut down last year

Engadget

Meta's past use of facial recognition technology has once again landed the company in potential legal trouble. On Monday, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton filed a lawsuit against the company, alleging it had collected the biometric data of millions of Texans without obtaining their informed consent to do so. At the center of the case is Facebook's now discontinued use of facial recognition technology. The platform previously employed the technology as part of its "tag suggestions" feature, which used image recognition to scan photos and automatically tag users in them. Last November, Meta shut down that system, citing, among other reasons, " uncertainty" about how the technology would be regulated in the future.