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Ohio AG issues warning about "Frankenstein opioids," more powerful than fentanyl

FOX News

A dangerous, new group of synthetic opioids called nitazenes are rapidly spreading across the U.S. LONDON, Ohio โ€“ A dangerous, new group of synthetic opioids called "nitazenes" is rapidly spreading across the U.S. In Ohio, the state's Attorney General Dave Yost issued a warning about the prevalence of nitazenes as the Buckeye state saw an increase in the illicit drug. The drug, nicknamed "Frankestein opioids," can be 1.5 to 40 times more potent than fentanyl. It is not approved for medical use anywhere in the world but is currently being made in clandestine labs, according to a bulletin from the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI). At BCI, forensic experts are sounding the alarm after tracking a year-over-year increase in nitazenes. In the first quarter of 2022, BCI reported 143 nitazene cases in Ohio, up from 27 cases in the same quarter of 2021.


Kilmeade: George Orwell's dystopian society becoming a reality with Biden's latest action

FOX News

BRIAN KILMEADE: In his classic novel "1984," George Orwell warned the world of the dangers of government addicted to power. One where the narrative was controlled by the state and the people were forced to bend a knee. Truth-telling became the cardinal sin of Orwell's dystopian state, where a power hungry state reigned in on shutting down free speech and was all guided by what Orwell termed the Ministry of Truth. A propaganda branch of the state, in his book, whose priority was to control all forms of public information where industries like journalism, entertainment and art were all controlled by Big Brother, and the state told you what the truth was actually in their mind, which was the truth accepted. Now, the people had no say in any of it.



Line Go Up

#artificialintelligence

Tim Maughan is a writer of fiction and nonfiction. His debut novel "Infinite Detail" (FSG, 2019) was The Guardian's science fiction and fantasy book of the year and was shortlisted for the Locus Award for best first novel. "Where'd you find this guy?" Dave Clutch asks me, pushing bangs out of anime-girl eyes with a flick of a cell-shaded hand. "Yeah, nice try lol," I reply. "Like I'm gonna tell you my trade secrets." I brace for a stylized sweat drop that never comes, thankfully. The aesthetic is so played out that my reaction to it borders on allergic, but at least it is an aesthetic. When I first found Dave he was just another youtuber, all skinny white boy grey skin and sagging eye bags lit by nothing but the slowly cycling RGB LEDs of his gaming rig, staring awkwardly into the camera as he read his scripts and flicked real bangs of hobbit hair out of his eyes. It was a look that screamed a desperate need for authenticity, and it was the first thing I had to beat out of him. Back then he was posting weekly videos about his patent dives into smart contact lens technology -- long, rambling monologues detailing what he'd unearthed about some obscure Chinese manufacturer and how they were going to "reinvent personal immersion" by making VR headsets and spex obsolete. What he didn't know was that the company was already in acquisition talks with Meta, and they'd been feeding him bullshit patents for fantasy tech in order to drive their market value up. Meta didn't give a fuck, the whole deal was pocket change for them, but the day traders whose algos had already decided his info was whack and the company was a good shorting opportunity were pissed and braying for blood. It didn't help that Dave had been stupid enough to blow his student loans on buying shares in them himself. It was not, as we used to say, a good look.


What Humans Lose When We Let AI Decide

#artificialintelligence

It's been more than 50 years since HAL, the malevolent computer in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey, first terrified audiences by turning against the astronauts he was supposed to protect. That cinematic moment captures what many of us still fear in AI: that it may gain superhuman powers and subjugate us. But instead of worrying about futuristic sci-fi nightmares, we should instead wake up to an equally alarming scenario that is unfolding before our eyes: We are increasingly, unsuspectingly yet willingly, abdicating our power to make decisions based on our own judgment, including our moral convictions. What we believe is "right" risks becoming no longer a question of ethics but simply what the "correct" result of a mathematical calculation is. Day to day, computers already make many decisions for us, and on the surface, they seem to be doing a good job.


The Wondrous, Gloriously Absurd Spectacle of "Moonfall"

The New Yorker

"Moonfall," Roland Emmerich's latest exercise in fantasy destruction, is the second major movie to come out recently in which a huge space body is hurtling toward Earth and risks destroying all human life. In the other, "Don't Look Up," the menace is a comet, but the real story is the corruption of American politics and culture that prevents a rational response and leads to catastrophe. Whether the comet represents climate change (as the makers of "Don't Look Up" assert) or the COVID-19 pandemic (as fits the movie best), the celestial body is nonetheless only a MacGuffin, a pretext to expose the human follies that are the movie's subject. But, in "Moonfall," Emmerich is interested--really, really interested--in the moon. His obvious enthusiasm for the gloriously absurd science-fiction reconception of the moon drives the directorial pleasure principle, and it's infectious.


Can Science Fiction Wake Us Up to Our Climate Reality?

The New Yorker

This content can also be viewed on the site it originates from. Last summer, the science-fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson went on a backpacking trip with some friends. They headed into the High Sierra, hiking toward Deadman Canyon--a fifty-mile walk through challenging terrain. Now sixty-nine, Robinson has been hiking and camping in the Sierras for half a century. At home, in Davis, California, he tracks his explorations on a wall-mounted map, its topography thick with ink.


4 times Shakespeare has inspired stories about robots and AI

#artificialintelligence

Science fiction is a genre very much associated with technological marvels, innovations, and visions of the future. So it may be surprising to find so many of its writers are drawn to Shakespeare โ€“ he's a figure associated with tradition and the past. Sometimes his plays are reworked in a science fiction setting. The 1956 film Forbidden Planet is just one of many variations on a "Tempest in space" theme. Sometimes the playwright appears as a character caught up in a time travel adventure.


Council Post: What Is The Future Of Artificial Intelligence In Photo Editing?

#artificialintelligence

Ben Meisner is the Founder of the leading online photo editing platform Ribbet.com. Artificial intelligence (AI) may seem like a buzzword of the 21st century, but it entered the human psyche some time ago. A Harvard article on the history of AI points out that science fiction brought the concept into our minds in the first half of the 20th century through characters like the Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz and the humanoid robot impersonating Maria in Metropolis. Mankind is now taking the concept from idea to reality, and today AI has tremendous application in everything from medicine, construction and finance to home appliances, social media and copywriting. It has the unique capability to quickly learn from significant amounts of data, enabling it to tackle some of our most challenging technological issues.


Four times Shakespeare has inspired stories about robots and AI

#artificialintelligence

Science fiction is a genre very much associated with technological marvels, innovations, and visions of the future. So it may be surprising to find so many of its writers are drawn to Shakespeare โ€“ he's a figure associated with tradition and the past. Sometimes his plays are reworked in a science fiction setting. The 1956 film Forbidden Planet is just one of many variations on a "Tempest in space" theme. Sometimes the playwright appears as a character caught up in a time travel adventure.