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Artificial general intelligence: Are we close, and does it even make sense to try?

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The idea of artificial general intelligence as we know it today starts with a dot-com blowout on Broadway. Twenty years ago--before Shane Legg clicked with neuroscience postgrad Demis Hassabis over a shared fascination with intelligence; before the pair hooked up with Hassabis's childhood friend Mustafa Suleyman, a progressive activist, to spin that fascination into a company called DeepMind; before Google bought that company for more than half a billion dollars four years later--Legg worked at a startup in New York called Webmind, set up by AI researcher Ben Goertzel. Today the two men represent two very different branches of the future of artificial intelligence, but their roots reach back to common ground. Even for the heady days of the dot-com bubble, Webmind's goals were ambitious. Goertzel wanted to create a digital baby brain and release it onto the internet, where he believed it would grow up to become fully self-aware and far smarter than humans.


Machine learning includes deep learning and neural nets

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Human intelligence reflects our brain's ability to learn. Computer systems that act like humans use artificial intelligence. That means these systems are under the control of computer programs that can learn. Just as people do, computers can learn to use data and then make decisions or assessments from what they've learned. Called machine learning, it's part of the larger field of artificial intelligence.


Why AI can't solve unknown problems

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When will we have artificial general intelligence, the kind of AI that can mimic the human mind in all aspect? Experts are divided on the topic, and answers range anywhere between a few decades and never. But what everyone agrees on is that current AI systems are a far shot from human intelligence. Humans can explore the world, discover unsolved problems, and think about their solutions. Meanwhile, the AI toolbox continues to grow with algorithms that can perform specific tasks but can't generalize their capabilities beyond their narrow domains.


Playing Pong using Reinforcement Learning

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In the 1970s, Pong was a very popular video arcade game. It is a 2D video game emulating table tennis, i.e. you got a bat (a rectangle) you can move vertically and try to hit a "ball" (a moving square). If the ball hits the bounding box of the game, it bounces back like a billiard ball. If you miss the ball, the opponent scores. A single-player adaptation Breakout came out later, where the ball had the ability to destroy some blocks on the top of the screen and the bat moved to the bottom of the screen.


Why AI can't solve unknown problems

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Welcome to AI book reviews, a series of posts that explore the latest literature on artificial intelligence. When will we have artificial general intelligence, the kind of AI that can mimic the human mind in all aspect? Experts are divided on the topic, and answers range anywhere between a few decades and never. But what everyone agrees on is that current AI systems are a far shot from human intelligence. Humans can explore the world, discover unsolved problems, and think about their solutions.


AI Sudoku Solver

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Sudoku is a puzzle in which players insert the numbers one to nine into a grid consisting of nine squares subdivided into a further nine smaller squares in such a way that every number appears once in each horizontal line, vertical line, and square. Using OpenCV, Deep Learning, and Backtracking Algorithm, We can solve the sudoku puzzle. First, build the Character Recognition model that can extract digits from a Sudoku grid image and then work on a backtracking approach to solve it. The model Convolution Neural Network(CNN) uses Keras (keras 2.3.1) on Tensorflow for Digit Recognition. Looking for a sudoku puzzle in the image: In this part, we'll be focusing on how to extract the sudoku grid i.e. our Region of Interest (ROI) from the input image.


Top-10 Research Papers in AI

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Each year scientists from around the world publish thousands of research papers in AI but only a few of them reach wide audiences and make a global impact in the world. Below are the top-10 most impactful research papers published in top AI conferences during the last 5 years. The ranking is based on the number of citations and includes major AI conferences and journals. Explaining and Harnessing Adversarial Examples, Goodfellow et al., ICLR 2015, cited by 6995 One of the first fast ways to generate adversarial examples for neural networks and introduction of adversarial training as a regularization technique. Impact: Exposed an interesting phenomenon where performance of any accurate machine learning model can be significantly reduced by an attacker applying a tiny modification to the input.


Council Post: From Digital To Physical: The Ultimate Challenge For AI

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In the summer of 2012, Google made a big media splash when it showed that its researchers "trained a network of 1,000 computers wired up like a brain to recognize cats." While AI, neural networks and its most recent rebranding, "deep learning," were already established fields with decades of research and countless real-world applications behind them, the world at large (and all its cats) took notice. Deep learning, a branch of AI that closely mimics how neurons wire and fire, was becoming more powerful: The massive amounts of digital data and compute power needed for training these systems were now available to companies like Google. Since 2012, applications of AI have expanded to both the consumer and enterprise realms. For instance, AI can be applied to make smart phone pictures more beautiful, delete spam messages, recognize faces, translate languages, make video games more appealing and optimize sales engagements, among many others.


Machines that learn: The origin story of artificial intelligence

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Lee Sedol, a world champion in the Chinese strategy board game Go, faced a new kind of adversary at a 2016 match in Seoul. Developers at DeepMind, an artificial intelligence startup acquired by Google, had fed 30 million Go moves into a deep neural network. Their creation, dubbed AlphaGo, then figured out which moves worked by playing millions of games against itself, learning at a faster rate than any human ever could. The match, which AlphaGo won 4 to 1, "was the moment when the new movement in artificial intelligence exploded into the public consciousness," technology journalist Cade Metz writes in his engaging new book, "Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google, Facebook, and the World." Metz, who covers AI for The New York Times and previously wrote for Wired magazine, is well positioned to chart the decades-long effort to build artificially intelligent machines.


Artificial Intelligence for Simple Games

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Artificial Intelligence for Simple Games - Learn how to use powerful Deep Reinforcement Learning and Artificial Intelligence tools on examples of AI simple games! Created by Jan Warchocki, Ligency TeamPreview this Course - GET COUPON CODE Ever wish you could harness the power of Deep Learning and Machine Learning to craft intelligent bots built for gaming? If you're looking for a creative way to dive into Artificial Intelligence, then'Artificial Intelligence for Simple Games' is your key to building lasting knowledge. Learn and test your AI knowledge of fundamental DL and ML algorithms using the fun and flexible environment of simple games such as Snake, the Travelling Salesman problem, mazes and more. Whether you're an absolute beginner or seasoned Machine Learning expert, this course provides a solid foundation of the basic and advanced concepts you need to build AI within a gaming environment and beyond.