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AI and the Fear of Irrational Humans

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I see distant horizons clearly and work meticulously towards them. Low EQ, Not Robots, is Humanity's Biggest Threat. Having high emotional intelligence (EQ) is having the ability to parse one's own emotions as well as navigate the emotions of those around us to the mutual benefit of oneself and society. As a measure of developmental achievement compared to general intelligence (IQ) most individuals are barely aware of EQ and contemporary society does very little to cultivate it. For example, IQ provides you with accurate information for a heated debate on Facebook while EQ guides your exchange from a place of empathy and allows you to walk away from exchanges that may cause more emotional harm than good to either party.


Artificial Intelligence and Ethics: Sixteen Challenges and Opportunities

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Brian Patrick Green is the director of Technology Ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics. This article is an update of an earlier article which can be found here [1]. Artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies are rapidly transforming society and will continue to do so in the coming decades. This social transformation will have deep ethical impact, with these powerful new technologies both improving and disrupting human lives. AI, as the externalization of human intelligence, offers us in amplified form everything that humanity already is, both good and evil. At this crossroads in history we should think very carefully about how to make this transition, or we risk empowering the grimmer side of our nature, rather than the brighter. Why is AI ethics becoming a problem now?


The complicated world of AI consciousness

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This article is part of "the philosophy of artificial intelligence," a series of posts that explore the ethical, moral, and social implications of AI today and in the future Would true artificial intelligence be conscious and experience the world like us? Will we lose our humanity if we install AI implants in our brains? Should robots and humans have equal rights? If I replicate an AI version of myself, who will be the real me? These are the kind of questions we think of when watching science fiction movies and TV series such as Her, Westworld, and Ex Machina.


Realizing the full potential of AI in the workplace

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is one of the signature issues of our time, but also one of the most easily misinterpreted. The prominent computer scientist Andrew Ng's slogan "AI is the new electricity"2 signals that AI is likely to be an economic blockbuster--a general-purpose technology3 with the potential to reshape business and societal landscapes alike. Just as electricity transformed almost everything 100 years ago, today I actually have a hard time thinking of an industry that I don't think AI will transform in the next several years.4 Such provocative statements naturally prompt the question: How will AI technologies change the role of humans in the workplaces of the future? An implicit assumption shaping many discussions of this topic might be called the "substitution" view: namely, that AI and other technologies will perform a continually expanding set of tasks better and more cheaply than humans, while humans will remain employed to perform those tasks at which machines ...


The Ethics of AI and Emotional Intelligence - The Partnership on AI

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The experimental use of AI spread across sectors and moved beyond the internet into the physical world. Stores used AI perceptions of shoppers' moods and interest to display personalized public ads. Schools used AI to quantify student joy and engagement in the classroom. Employers used AI to evaluate job applicants' moods and emotional reactions in automated video interviews and to monitor employees' facial expressions in customer service positions. It was a year notable for increasing criticism and governance of AI related to emotion and affect.


Philosophers On GPT-3 (updated with replies by GPT-3) - Daily Nous

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Nine philosophers explore the various issues and questions raised by the newly released language model, GPT-3, in this edition of Philosophers On, guest edited by Annette Zimmermann. Introduction Annette Zimmermann, guest editor GPT-3, a powerful, 175 billion parameter language model developed recently by OpenAI, has been galvanizing public debate and controversy. As the MIT Technology Review puts it: “OpenAI’s new language generator GPT-3 is shockingly good—and completely mindless”. Parts of the technology community hope (and fear) that GPT-3 could brings us one step closer to the hypothetical future possibility of human-like, highly sophisticated artificial general intelligence (AGI). Meanwhile, others (including OpenAI’s own CEO) have critiqued claims about GPT-3’s ostensible proximity to AGI, arguing that they are vastly overstated. Why the hype? As is turns out, GPT-3 is unlike other natural language processing (NLP) systems, the latter of which often struggle with what comes comparatively easily to humans: performing entirely new language tasks based on a few simple instructions and examples. Instead, NLP systems usually have to be pre-trained on a large corpus of text, and then fine-tuned in order to successfully perform a specific task. GPT-3, by contrast, does not require fine tuning of this kind: it seems to be able to perform a whole range of tasks reasonably well, from producing fiction, poetry, and press releases to functioning code, and from music, jokes, and technical manuals, to “news articles which human evaluators have difficulty distinguishing from articles written by humans”. The Philosophers On series contains group posts on issues of current interest, with the aim being to show what the careful thinking characteristic of philosophers (and occasionally scholars in related fields) can bring to popular ongoing conversations. Contributors present not fully worked out position papers but rather brief thoughts that can serve as prompts for further reflection and discussion. The contributors to this installment of “Philosophers On” are Amanda Askell (Research Scientist, OpenAI), David Chalmers (Professor of Philosophy, New York University), Justin Khoo (Associate Professor of Philosophy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Carlos Montemayor (Professor of Philosophy, San Francisco State University), C. Thi Nguyen (Associate Professor of Philosophy, University of Utah), Regina Rini (Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of Moral and Social Cognition, York University), Henry Shevlin (Research Associate, Leverhulme Centre for..


The future of Artificial Intelligence and what it means to the Enterprise?

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Technology headed by AI has been instrumental in augmenting human capacities and reinventing human lifestyle. Code-driven systems integrating information and connectivity have ushered a new era which was previously unimagined bringing untapped opportunities and unprecedented threats. Technology experts across the world have predicted that networked artificial intelligence will amplify human effectiveness besides threating human autonomy, and capabilities. Modern enterprises generate data and most of that still battles against data abuse. Most AI tools are and will be dominated by companies and governments who are striving for profits or power.


GPT-3 Creative Fiction

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What if I told a story here, how would that story start?" Thus, the summarization prompt: "My second grader asked me what this passage means: …" When a given prompt isn't working and GPT-3 keeps pivoting into other modes of completion, that may mean that one hasn't constrained it enough by imitating a correct output, and one needs to go further; writing the first few words or sentence of the target output may be necessary.


Why the future of AI is open source

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Artificial general intelligence (AGI), which is the next phase of artificial intelligence, where computers meet and exceed human intelligence, will almost certainly be open source. AGI seeks to solve the broad spectrum of problems that intelligent human beings can solve. This is in direct contrast with narrow AI (encompassing most of today's AI), which seeks to exceed human abilities at a specific problem. Put simply, AGI is all the expectations of AI come true. At a fundamental level, we don't really know what intelligence is and whether there might be types of intelligence that are different from human intelligence.


Will AI replace Humans - Artificial Intelligence vs Human Intelligence - DataFlair

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The subject of AI unrest is really easily proven wrong. While some only have great things to say about AI, there are numerous AI specialists who have taken a stand in opposition to the sort of negative impact of AI that can have on the general public. They also mentioned the analysts to investigate the cultural impacts of Artificial Intelligence. With the increasing use of AI technologies across industries, the important question is, "Will AI replace humans?" In this article, let's find this out.