Goto

Collaborating Authors

Issues


Threat Intelligence Best-Practice Tips

#artificialintelligence

A lot of people say threat intelligence (TI) tastes good, but few understand how to cook it. There are even fewer of those who know which processes to engage for TI to work and bring profit. Moreover, a negligible number of people know how to choose a feed provider, where to check a false positives indicator, and whether it's worthwhile to block a domain that your colleague has sent you over WhatsApp. We had two commercial APT subscriptions, ten information exchanges, about a dozen free feeds, and an extensive list of TOR exit nodes. We also used a couple of powerful reversers, master Powershell scripts, a Loki scanner and a paid VirusTotal subscription.


Machine Learning to Enable Positive Change An Interview with Adam Benzion

#artificialintelligence

Machine learning can enable positive change in society, says Adam Benzion, Chief Experience Officer at Edge Impulse. Read on to learn how the company is preventing unethical uses of its ML/AI development platform. Priscilla Haring-Kuipers: What Ethics in Electronics are you are working on? Adam Benzion: At Edge Impulse, we try to connect our work to doing good in the world as a core value to our culture and operating philosophy. Our founders, Zach Shelby and Jan Jongboom define this as "Machine learning can enable positive change in society, and we are dedicated to support applications for good."


AI is transforming medicine: Here's how we make sure it works for everyone

#artificialintelligence

We are excited to bring Transform 2022 back in-person July 19 and virtually July 20 - 28. Join AI and data leaders for insightful talks and exciting networking opportunities. What if your doctor could instantly test dozens of different treatments to discover the perfect one for your body, your health and your values? In my lab at Stanford University School of Medicine, we are working on artificial intelligence (AI) technology to create a "digital twin": a virtual representation of you based on your medical history, genetic profile, age, ethnicity, and a host of other factors like whether you smoke and how much you exercise. If you're sick, the AI can test out treatment options on this computerized twin, running through countless different scenarios to predict which interventions will be most effective. Instead of choosing a treatment regimen based on what works for the average person, your doctor can develop a plan based on what works for you.


Has artificial intelligence (AI) come alive like in sci-fi movies? This Google engineer thinks so

#artificialintelligence

If you have ever interacted with a chatbot you know we're still years away from those things convincing you that you are chatting with a real human. That's no surprise as many chatbots do not actually use machine learning to converse more naturally. Instead only completing scripted actions based on keywords. A good chatbot that truly utilises machine learning can fool you into thinking that you're talking to a human. In fact, a program from 1965 fooled people into thinking that it was a human.


Ethical AI Lapses Happen When No One Is Watching

#artificialintelligence

Transparency often plays a key role in ethical business dilemmas -- the more information we have, the easier it is to determine what are acceptable and unacceptable outcomes. If financials are misaligned, who made an accounting error? If data is breached, who was responsible for securing it and were they acting properly? Click here to view original web page at www.informationweek.com


Artificial Intelligence (7 weeks)

#artificialintelligence

This course explores the idea of artificial intelligence (A.I.) from three different perspectives: scientific, philosophical, and cultural. The scientific perspective provides insight as to how artificial intelligence technologies work, the current limitations, and supposed future potential. The philosophical perspective explores whether A.I. is good or bad, essential or dangerous, and what the future could hold. The cultural angle examines how society views A.I. and whether these views are accurate. Toward the end of the course deeper topics will be introduced including how A.I. compares to human intelligence, the singularity, and futurism.


What is Artificial Intelligence? How does AI work, Types, Trends and Future of it?

#artificialintelligence

Let's take a detailed look. This is the most common form of AI that you'd find in the market now. These Artificial Intelligence systems are designed to solve one single problem and would be able to execute a single task really well. By definition, they have narrow capabilities, like recommending a product for an e-commerce user or predicting the weather. This is the only kind of Artificial Intelligence that exists today. They're able to come close to human functioning in very specific contexts, and even surpass them in many instances, but only excelling in very controlled environments with a limited set of parameters. AGI is still a theoretical concept. It's defined as AI which has a human-level of cognitive function, across a wide variety of domains such as language processing, image processing, computational functioning and reasoning and so on.


Federal Government Proposes New Law to Regulate Artificial Intelligence Systems

#artificialintelligence

On June 16, 2022, the federal government introduced Bill C-27, the Digital Charter Implementation Act, 2022 (Bill C-27 or Bill). If passed, the Bill would significantly reform federal private-sector privacy law. It would also introduce rules to regulate "high-impact" artificial intelligence (AI) systems under a new Artificial Intelligence and Data Act (AIDA). Like the EU's recent proposal, the AIDA would take a harm-based approach to regulating AI by creating new obligations for yet-to-be-defined "high-impact systems." Below we provide an overview of the new proposal to regulate AI systems. Be sure to read our companion Blakes Bulletin on Bill C-27's proposals to reform private-sector privacy laws.


Debate over AI sentience marks a watershed moment

#artificialintelligence

We are excited to bring Transform 2022 back in-person July 19 and virtually July 20 - 28. Join AI and data leaders for insightful talks and exciting networking opportunities. The AI field is at a significant turning point. On the one hand, engineers, ethicists, and philosophers are publicly debating whether new AI systems such as LaMDA – Google's artificially intelligent chatbot generator – have demonstrated sentience, and (if so) whether they should be afforded human rights. At the same time, much of the advance in AI in recent years, is based on deep learning neural networks, yet there is a growing argument from AI luminaries such as Gary Marcus and Yann LeCun that these networks cannot lead to systems capable of sentience or consciousness. Just the fact that the industry is having this debate is a watershed moment.


The Uncanny Valley -- Chatbot & CRM

#artificialintelligence

A chatbot is software that simulates human-like conversations with users via text messages on chat. Its key task is to help users by providing answers to their questions. If we dive deep, chatbots are pieces of conversational software powered by artificial intelligence that have the capability to engage in one-to-one chat with customers on their preferred chat platform such as Facebook Messenger, Whatsapp, Instagram, Telegram, Slack and many more conversational platforms. Chatbots, run by pre-programmed algorithms, natural language processing and/or machine learning and conversed in ways that mimicked human communication. Unlike other automated customer service solutions such as IVRS systems that were universally disliked for their robotic nature, Chatbots are seen to get closer to passing the Turing Test convincingly simulating a human conversational partner so well that it was difficult to sense one was chatting with a machine. British Al pioneer Alan Turing in 1950 proposed a test to determine whether machines could think. According to the Turing test, a computer could demonstrate intelligence if a human interviewer, conversing with an unseen human and an unseen computer, could not tell which was which. Although much work has been done in many of the subgroups that fall under the Al umbrella, critics believe that no computer can truly pass the Turing test.