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The Role of Social Movements, Coalitions, and Workers in Resisting Harmful Artificial Intelligence and Contributing to the Development of Responsible AI

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

There is mounting public concern over the influence that AI based systems has in our society. Coalitions in all sectors are acting worldwide to resist hamful applications of AI. From indigenous people addressing the lack of reliable data, to smart city stakeholders, to students protesting the academic relationships with sex trafficker and MIT donor Jeffery Epstein, the questionable ethics and values of those heavily investing in and profiting from AI are under global scrutiny. There are biased, wrongful, and disturbing assumptions embedded in AI algorithms that could get locked in without intervention. Our best human judgment is needed to contain AI's harmful impact. Perhaps one of the greatest contributions of AI will be to make us ultimately understand how important human wisdom truly is in life on earth.


Want to Do Crimes? Upgrade to 5G, Apparently

#artificialintelligence

Europe's police agency is worried that the 5G will interfere with law enforcement's ability to track people. Catherine De Bolle, head of Europol is asking European Union leaders to allow their agency to be more engaged in policy conversations involving the adoption of 5G technology, Reuters reports. Police agencies in Europe, and the U.S., are capable of tracking and listening in on cell phones using 4G, but, many of the tools they use don't work in the 5G network, De Bolle told Reuters. She explained that 5G networks spread data across networks in a way that makes it difficult to track. While 5G is still very new, we've already seen a handful of 5G-ready phones like the Galaxy S10 5G, … "It is one of the most important investigative tools that police officers and services have, so we need this in the future," De Bolle told Reuters, describing Europol's tracking surveillance that works on the current mobile infrastructure.


CES 2019: What we learned from the world's biggest tech show

The Independent - Tech

Every year the technology industry gathers in Las Vegas for the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), an event that often sets the agenda for the coming 12 months. This is what CES 2019 taught us. The first 5G networks are expected to begin rolling out this year, and so the next-generation connectivity technology was being mentioned everywhere at CES. Intel, Qualcomm and Samsung all spoke about harnessing the technology to not just offer faster mobile internet speeds, but also to connect more devices and appliances to each other and be able to handle more data in the process. Experts at the show also commented on the higher capacity of 5G networks being able to support the software needed to power networks of driverless cars and robots. The halls of this year's CES hinted at a world where homes, cars and even entire cities are connected to one another, with people able to use these connections to complete tasks every day.