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Could Artificial Intelligence Replace Photography?

#artificialintelligence

With technology continuing to move on at a swift pace, there's been plenty of recent discussion as to whether digital renders can truly ever replace product photography. Taking this one step further, is it possible that one day, artificial intelligence could simply create images without needing any input from a photographer or digital artist at all? As photographers, we often marvel at how amazing modern technology can be, how magical that new "must-have" camera feature is, or how smart the image-processing software has become. I don't consider myself to be especially old, but when I think back to using a manual-focusing 35mm SLR (because that's all we had to use, not because I'm a hipster) and compare that experience to the incredible face detection or eye detection autofocus on modern mirrorless cameras, it's hard to believe these huge technological advances have happened within my lifetime. Even the act of sitting in my living room, controlling the lighting and home entertainment with my voice, or video-calling a friend in another country on an iPad are literally things that my child self would have considered science fiction.


Mind the Gap: Dialogs on Artificial Intelligence: Episode 2: AI as a Prediction Tool - Business Law Today from ABA

#artificialintelligence

So far, advances in AI are not bringing us real "intelligence." Rather, these advances are bringing us a key part of intelligence: prediction. This enables businesses to make predictions faster and more precisely to improve their business models and marketplace advantage. In this episode of Mind the Gap, Avi Goldfarb, an economist at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management and one of the authors of "Prediction Machines: The Simple Economics of Artificial Intelligence," will explain the economics of AI and how it can lead to better and cheaper predictions.


How safe is YOUR smart device? Popular gadgets including Amazon Echo and Google Nest can be HACKED

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Smart home devices from companies such as Amazon and Google can be hacked and used to crash websites, steal data and snoop on users, an investigation reveals. Consumer group Which? has found poor security on eight smart devices, some of which are no longer supported with vital security updates due to their age. Examples include the first generation Amazon Echo smart speaker, released in 2014, and a Virgin Media internet router from 2017. All of the products had vulnerabilities that could leave users exposed to cybercriminals, Which? Domestic abuse survivors can also be tracked and controlled by ex-partners who exploit weak security on devices including Wi-Fi routers and security cameras.


Pixy drone hands-on: A flying robot photographer for Snapchat users

Engadget

Drones are everywhere these days, filming dramatic reveals and awe-inspiring scenery for social media platforms. The problem is, they're not exactly approachable for beginners who have only ever used a smartphone. Last month, Snap debuted the $230 Pixy drone exactly for those people. It requires very little skill and acts like a personal robot photographer to help you produce nifty aerial shots. You don't need to pilot the Pixy.


Engadget Podcast: The crypto crash explained

Engadget

What the heck is going on in the land of cryptocurrency and NFTs? This week, Devindra and Engadget UK Bureau Chief Mat Smith chat with Manda Farough, co-host and producer of the Virtual Economy podcast, about the massive crypto crash. They discuss how the fall of the Luna cryptocurrency and its sibling, TerraUSD, sent shockwaves through the industry. Also, they dive into ICE's surprisingly robust (and scary) surveillance system, as well the DHS's stalled misinformation board. Stay tuned for the end of the show for our chat with Tim Miller and Jennifer Yuh Nelson, the co-creator and animation director for Netflix's Love, Death & Robots.


Hurry! Last chance to shop the bestselling Kindle e-reader for under £50

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Products featured in this Mail Best article are independently selected by our shopping writers. If you make a purchase using links on this page, MailOnline may earn an affiliate commission. If you love to read, you'll be pleased to hear that the original Kindle e-reader is on sale for just £49.99 at Amazon - but hurry, this deal ends today. The perfect reading solution for holidays and travelling, rather than weigh down your suitcase with books, the Kindle, which is now on sale with 29 per cent off, comes with 8GB of storage, so it can store thousands of books in one place - like a small library at your fingertips. And you won't even need to buy any titles as it comes with a free three month trial of Kindle Unlimited, giving you free access to millions of fiction and non-fiction titles as well as the latest celebrity autobiographies. While you may prefer the feel of a book, the Kindle has been designed to feel more comfortable to read than paperbacks.


The 7 best soundbars of 2022

ZDNet

What is the best soundbar? The Sonos Arc soundbar is our top recommendation. We distinguished the top contenders through specifications like sound quality, connectivity, voice control, design, inputs, size, price, customer reviews, and more to find the best soundbar for your TV.


Modern Tech Can't Shield Your Secret Identity

Communications of the ACM

Most comic book superheroes have a secret identity, usually to protect their friends and family from retribution. However, today's computer technology would make it impossible for a superhero to maintain their secret identity. Take Spider-Man, who has a habit of diving into an alley to change into costume. However, video cameras are pervasive in New York City, which could easily capture video of him donning his mask. The New York City Police Department operates over 15,000 surveillance cameras,1 but there are thousands more Webcams controlled by residents and commercial entities.


Westworld season 4: everything we know

#artificialintelligence

Westworld season 4 was confirmed a couple of weeks before the season 3 finale aired in May 2020, suggesting that HBO still has plenty of faith in its big-budget sci-fi drama. "From the western theme park to the technocratic metropolis of the near future, we've thoroughly enjoyed every twist and turn from the minds of master storytellers Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy," said president of HBO programming, Casey Bloys in a company statement. "We can't wait to see where their inspired vision takes us next." Showrunners Nolan and Joy are back to continue their epic tale – based on the 1973 movie directed by Jurassic Park author Michael Crichton – and, going on past form, it's probably best to expect the unexpected. In its third year, the drama took a hard turn away from the android theme park setting at the heart of the first two seasons, spending most of its time in the human world.


New Book 'The Velocity of Information' Discovers Humans' Breaking Point During Chaos - California Newswire

#artificialintelligence

MADISON, Wis., Apr 11, 2022 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) -- "The Velocity of Information – Human Thinking During Chaotic Times" (ISBN: 978-1475865455), authored by David P. Perrodin, Ph.D., and published by Rowman & Littlefield, rigorously clarifies and deepens how we think about societal human behavior and mental health during days, weeks, months, or even years of chaos. This is an invigorating scholarly work for all audiences. As chaos erupts, alerts screech on our cell phones and torrents of conflicting-yet-urgent messages gush from media outlets. What is the magnitude of the crisis? And what should people do to protect themselves?