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Artificial Intelligence Masters The Game of Poker – What Does That Mean For Humans?

#artificialintelligence

While AI had some success at beating humans at other games such as chess and Go (games that follow predefined rules and aren't random), winning at poker proved to be more challenging because it requires strategy, intuition, and reasoning based on hidden information. Despite the challenges, artificial intelligence can now play--and win--poker. Artificial intelligence systems including DeepStack and Libratus paved the way for Pluribus, the AI that beat five other players in six-player Texas Hold'em, the most popular version of poker. This feat goes beyond games. This achievement means that artificial intelligence can now expand to help solve some of the world's most challenging issues.


Artificial Intelligence Masters The Game of Poker – What Does That Mean For Humans?

#artificialintelligence

While AI had some success at beating humans at other games such as chess and Go (games that follow predefined rules and aren't random), winning at poker proved to be more challenging because it requires strategy, intuition, and reasoning based on hidden information. Despite the challenges, artificial intelligence can now play--and win--poker. Artificial intelligence systems including DeepStack and Libratus paved the way for Pluribus, the AI that beat five other players in six-player Texas Hold'em, the most popular version of poker. This feat goes beyond games. This achievement means that artificial intelligence can now expand to help solve some of the world's most challenging issues.


Artificial Intelligence Masters The Game of Poker – What Does That Mean For Humans?

#artificialintelligence

While AI had some success at beating humans at other games such as chess and Go (games that follow predefined rules and aren't random), winning at poker proved to be more challenging because it requires strategy, intuition, and reasoning based on hidden information. Despite the challenges, artificial intelligence can now play--and win--poker. Artificial Intelligence Masters The Game of Poker – What Does That Mean For Humans? Artificial intelligence systems including DeepStack and Libratus paved the way for Pluribus, the AI that beat five other players in six-player Texas Hold'em, the most popular version of poker. This feat goes beyond games. This achievement means that artificial intelligence can now expand to help solve some of the world's most challenging issues.


Why it's a big deal that AI knows how to bluff in poker

#artificialintelligence

As the great Kenny Rogers once said, a good gambler has to know when to hold'em and know when to fold'em. At the Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh this week, a computer program called Libratus may finally prove that computers can do this better than any human card player. Libratus is playing thousands of games of heads-up, or two-player, no-limit Texas hold'em against several expert professional poker players. Now a little more than halfway through the 20-day contest, Libratus is up by almost $800,000 against its human opponents. So victory, while far from guaranteed, may well be in the cards.


How rival bots battled their way to poker supremacy

#artificialintelligence

Top professional poker players have been beaten by AI bots at no-limits hold' em. A complex variant of poker is the latest game to be mastered by artificial intelligence (AI). And it has been conquered not once, but twice, by two rival bots developed by separate research teams. Both algorithms plays a'no limits' two-player version of Texas Hold'Em. And each has in recent months hit a crucial AI milestone: they have beaten human professional players.


Computers can now challenge -- and beat -- professional poker players at Texas hold 'em

Los Angeles Times

First they figured out how to play checkers and backgammon. Then they mastered chess, Go, "Jeopardy!" and even a few Atari video games. Now computers can challenge humans at the poker table -- and win. DeepStack, a software program developed at the University of Alberta's Computer Poker Research Group, took on 33 professional poker players in more than 44,000 hands of Texas hold'em. Overall, the program won by a significantly higher margin than if it had simply folded in each round, according to a new study in Science.


Artificial intelligence goes deep to beat humans at poker

#artificialintelligence

Machines are finally getting the best of humans at poker. Two artificial intelligence (AI) programs have finally proven they "know when to hold'em, and when to fold'em," recently beating human professional card players for the first time at the popular poker game of Texas Hold'em. And this week the team behind one of those AIs, known as DeepStack, has divulged some of the secrets to its success--a triumph that could one day lead to AIs that perform tasks ranging from from beefing up airline security to simplifying business negotiations. AIs have long dominated games such as chess, and last year one conquered Go, but they have made relatively lousy poker players. In DeepStack researchers have broken their poker losing streak by combining new algorithms and deep machine learning, a form of computer science that in some ways mimics the human brain, allowing machines to teach themselves.


Time to Fold, Humans: Poker-Playing AI Beats Pros at Texas Hold'em

#artificialintelligence

It is no mystery why poker is such a popular pastime: the dynamic card game produces drama in spades as players are locked in a complicated tango of acting and reacting that becomes increasingly tense with each escalating bet. The same elements that make poker so entertaining have also created a complex problem for artificial intelligence (AI). A study published today in Science describes an AI system called DeepStack that recently defeated professional human players in heads-up, no-limit Texas hold'em poker, an achievement that represents a leap forward in the types of problems AI systems can solve. DeepStack, developed by researchers at the University of Alberta, relies on the use of artificial neural networks that researchers trained ahead of time to develop poker intuition. During play, DeepStack uses its poker smarts to break down a complicated game into smaller, more manageable pieces that it can then work through on the fly.


Why Poker Is a Big Deal for Artificial Intelligence

MIT Technology Review

As the great Kenny Rogers once said, a good gambler has to know when to hold'em and know when to fold'em. At the Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh this week, a computer program called Libratus may finally prove that computers can do this better than any human card player. Libratus is playing thousands of games of heads-up, or two-player, no-limit Texas hold'em against several expert professional poker players. Now a little more than halfway through the 20-day contest, Libratus is up by almost $800,000 against its human opponents. So victory, while far from guaranteed, may well be in the cards.


Computer cashes in big at Texas Hold 'Em tourney

AITopics Original Links

One of the proving grounds for artificial intelligence is games. Classic games have a fixed set of rules, and these make it easier for researchers to develop new techniques and algorithms that enable computers to play (and hopefully win) various games. Tic-tac-toe, checkers, and chess are all games where researchers have developed software that is capable of winning or drawing when paired off against the best human players in the world. Last weekend, researchers at the University of Alberta added another classic game to this list: poker. In a series of matches that took place over the Fourth of July weekend in Las Vegas, the researchers' Polaris poker program won against a group of top-ranked online poker players.