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Microsoft's Activision purchase could leave Japanese video game-makers out in the cold

The Japan Times

Microsoft Corp. threw down the gauntlet last week with its biggest-ever acquisition, agreeing to purchase Activision Blizzard Inc. for a whopping $68.7 billion (¥7.8 trillion) in a deal that could preclude major shakeups in the lucrative video game industry. But where that leaves Japan's top gaming firms, from Sony to top third-party developers like Capcom and Square Enix, remains to be seen. As hype over the so-called metaverse reaches a fever pitch, a slew of video game developers will likely seek partners to team up with or get absorbed by global tech titans to get ahead of the competition. If that comes to fruition, long-established Japanese game-makers may be left out in the cold, as those firms are unlikely to make such decisions in an agile or flexible manner due to their traditional and conservative mindset, analysts said. Microsoft's move this time is "literally the beginning of the race" among tech behemoths to acquire firms that will give them a competitive edge going forward, said Satoshi Kurihara, senior analyst at the Tokai Tokyo Research Institute.


High-speed 5G network seen as ready to give big boost to online gaming

The Japan Times

CHIBA – At this year's Tokyo Game Show, the big draw was next-generation 5G networking -- setting pulses racing with the prospect of a radically more immersive gaming experience. Offering data transmission speeds around 100 times faster than 4G, 5G is expected to enable more seamless imagery -- particularly lower latency, more vivid images -- and sharper motion. Industry experts say it will dramatically improve the quality of augmented and virtual reality games. "It was very smooth, responsive and consistent," said Omar Alshiji, a 23-year-old game designer from Bahrain, after trying out the fighting game Tekken at the NTT Docomo Inc. booth. The major mobile carrier installed 5G base stations at its booth this year, making the high-speed network available at the show.


High-speed 5G network seen as ready to give big boost to online gaming

The Japan Times

CHIBA – Next-generation 5G networking was the big draw at Tokyo Game Show 2019, setting pulses racing with the prospect of a radically more immersive gaming experience. Offering data transmission speeds around 100 times faster than 4G, 5G is expected to enable more seamless imagery with lower latency, more vivid images and sharper motion. Industry experts say it will dramatically improve the quality of augmented and virtual reality games. "It was very smooth, responsive and consistent," said Omar Alshiji, a 23-year-old game designer from Bahrain, after trying out the fighting game "Tekken" at the NTT Docomo Inc. booth at the four-day game show in Chiba. The major mobile carrier installed 5G base stations at its booth this year, making the high-speed network available at the show.