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The Role of Knowledge Graphs in Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Representing knowledge and the reasoning for the conclusions drawn has remained a cornerstone of artificial intelligence (AI) for decades. A knowledge graph (KG) is a powerful data structure that represents information in a graphical format. DBpedia, an open source knowledge graph defines a knowledge graph as "a special kind of database which stores knowledge in a machine-readable form and provides a means for information to be collected, organised, shared, searched and utilised." Formally, a KG is a directed labeled graph which represents relations between data points. A node of the KG represents a data point.


Machine Knowledge: Creation and Curation of Comprehensive Knowledge Bases

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Equipping machines with comprehensive knowledge of the world's entities and their relationships has been a long-standing goal of AI. Over the last decade, large-scale knowledge bases, also known as knowledge graphs, have been automatically constructed from web contents and text sources, and have become a key asset for search engines. This machine knowledge can be harnessed to semantically interpret textual phrases in news, social media and web tables, and contributes to question answering, natural language processing and data analytics. This article surveys fundamental concepts and practical methods for creating and curating large knowledge bases. It covers models and methods for discovering and canonicalizing entities and their semantic types and organizing them into clean taxonomies. On top of this, the article discusses the automatic extraction of entity-centric properties. To support the long-term life-cycle and the quality assurance of machine knowledge, the article presents methods for constructing open schemas and for knowledge curation. Case studies on academic projects and industrial knowledge graphs complement the survey of concepts and methods.


Knowledge Graphs

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In this paper we provide a comprehensive introduction to knowledge graphs, which have recently garnered significant attention from both industry and academia in scenarios that require exploiting diverse, dynamic, large-scale collections of data. After a general introduction, we motivate and contrast various graph-based data models and query languages that are used for knowledge graphs. We discuss the roles of schema, identity, and context in knowledge graphs. We explain how knowledge can be represented and extracted using a combination of deductive and inductive techniques. We summarise methods for the creation, enrichment, quality assessment, refinement, and publication of knowledge graphs. We provide an overview of prominent open knowledge graphs and enterprise knowledge graphs, their applications, and how they use the aforementioned techniques. We conclude with high-level future research directions for knowledge graphs.


Industry-Scale Knowledge Graphs

Communications of the ACM

Knowledge graphs are critical to many enterprises today: They provide the structured data and factual knowledge that drive many products and make them more intelligent and "magical." In general, a knowledge graph describes objects of interest and connections between them. For example, a knowledge graph may have nodes for a movie, the actors in this movie, the director, and so on. Each node may have properties such as an actor's name and age. There may be nodes for multiple movies involving a particular actor. The user can then traverse the knowledge graph to collect information on all the movies in which the actor appeared or, if applicable, directed. Many practical implementations impose constraints on the links in knowledge graphs by defining a schema or ontology. For example, a link from a movie to its director must connect an object of type Movie to an object of type Person. In some cases the links themselves might have their own properties: a link connecting an actor and a movie might have the name of the specific role the actor played. Similarly, a link connecting a politician with a specific role in government might have the time period during which the politician held that role.