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Here's how Riot's offline 'League' and 'Valorant' competitions landed in Iceland

Washington Post - Technology News

For "League of Legends," the event is the beginning of a return to normalcy after the cancellation of last year's Mid-Season Invitational and the recalibration of Worlds in Shanghai in light of covid. The stakes are higher for "Valorant," which launched shortly after the beginning of the pandemic in the United States. The Iceland event will mark the first occasion of competition between teams from different regions; the strengths and weaknesses of respective regions has been a source of rampant speculation among professional players, coaches and analysts.


OWL's L.A. Valiant releases entire roster, citing visa issues in relocation to China

Washington Post - Technology News

The franchise did first investigate whether it would be possible to secure visas for the predominantly North American roster. The decision to relocate the Valiant came down to the ability to better plan around the volatility of the pandemic while competing in China or South Korea, Segal said. There's a higher likelihood that live, in-person OWL competitions will be possible to host in both countries this season. The Shanghai Dragons already hosted a series of in-person exhibition matches in December.


Cosplay and Covid: Video gamers defy the virus

BBC News

ChinaJoy, Asia's biggest video game conference, went ahead at the weekend, although it was very different from previous years' events. Most large-scale shows in the region have been scrapped as social distancing is enforced because of the coronavirus. But about 150,000 gaming fans descended on ChinaJoy in Shanghai for the four-day event. With a mix of real-world and online launches, many feel it could be the new normal for conferences. ChinaJoy, also known as the China Digital Entertainment Expo and Conference, saw around 380,000 visitors last year, keen to preview and play the latest games and new gadgets.


Quantum version of the ancient game of Go could be ultimate AI test

New Scientist

A new version of the ancient Chinese board game Go that uses quantum entanglement to add an element of randomness could make it a tougher test for artificial intelligences than regular board games. "Board games have long been good test beds for AI because these games provide closed worlds with specific and simple rules," says Xian-Min Jin at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China. In Go, players take turns to place a stone on a board, trying to surround and capture the opponent's stones.


'Iron Man VR' feels like a decent test run for a better future game

Washington Post - Technology News

Flying in the game is certainly a high point, and the movement never bothered me (though I'm not particularly prone to motion sickness). But even at the game's best, immersion-breaking moments are always around the bend. For instance, at one point, on a stage that takes place in Shanghai, I struggled to remove a power core from a machine before an explosion. As I did so, I watched helplessly as the game registered that I placed my hand around the component but failed to recognize me yanking it out. The result was a necessary do over and more haltering animations before I finally completed what should have been a simple task.


AIkido Pharma Adds Artificial Intelligence Leader to Advisory Board

#artificialintelligence

AIkido Pharma Incorporated (Nasdaq: AIKI) today announced the addition of Andreas Typaldos to the Company's Advisory Board. Mr. Typaldos is a pioneer software and technology entrepreneur, and a private equity investor through a Typaldos Family Office. Also, together with leading scientists in Drug Development at Tufts University and the Fudan University in Shanghai and the Shanghai Center for Drug Discovery and Development, he is on the Board of Directors of Quantitative Cell Diagnostix, www.qcd-x.com, In the past, Mr. Typaldos was founder, founding investor, Board Member, and Chief Executive of a number of software, technology, consulting services, and internet companies, including: Anthony Hayes, CEO of AIkido, noted "Mr. Typaldos is an industry leader in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. His participation on our advisory board will help the Company expand its Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) presence in the drug development field. We are honored he has agreed to lend his expertise and we are excited to work with him."


China has decided that article created by artificial intelligence (AI) is protected by copyright-Industry Global News24

#artificialintelligence

According to state news outlet China News Service, a court in Shenzhen, China, has ruled that an artificial intelligence (AI) generated article is protected by copyright, representing a notable milestone for AI's credentials as a creative force. Chinese tech giant Tencent has published content produced by automated software called Dreamwriter for the past five years, with an emphasis on business and financial stories. An online platform run by a company called Shanghai Yingxun Technology Company reproduced Tencent's AI-generated financial report on its own website in 2018. The article contained a disclaimer stating that it was "automatically written by Tencent Robot Dreamwriter;" however, the court found that the articulation and composition of the article had a "certain originality" and fulfilled the legal requirements to be recognized as a written work -- thereby applying for copyright. While the defendant had already deleted the report from its own website, a fine of 1,500 yuan ($217) was still payable.


Chinese court rules AI-written article is protected by copyright

#artificialintelligence

A court in Shenzhen, China, has ruled that an article generated by artificial intelligence (AI) is protected by copyright, according to state news outlet China News Service, representing a notable milestone for AI's credentials as a creative force. For the past five years Chinese tech titan Tencent has published content produced by automated software called Dreamwriter, with a focus on business and financial stories. In 2018, an online platform operated by a company called Shanghai Yingxun Technology Company replicated an AI-generated financial report from Tencent on its own website. The article included a disclaimer that said it was "automatically written by Tencent Robot Dreamwriter"; however, the court found that the article's articulation and expression had a "certain originality" and met the legal requirements to be classed as a written work -- thus it qualified for copyright protection. While the defendant had already removed the article from its own website, it was still required to pay a fine of 1,500 yuan ($217).


For Chinese kids and young adults, world of computer coding is child's play

The Japan Times

BEIJING – Wearing a pair of black-rimmed glasses and a red T-shirt, an 8-year-old Chinese boy is logged in for an online coding lesson -- as the teacher. Vita has set up a coding tutorial channel on the Chinese video streaming site Bilibili since August and has so far garnered nearly 60,000 followers and over 1 million views. He is among a growing number of children in China who are learning coding even before they enter primary school. The trend has been fueled by parents' belief that coding skills will be essential for Chinese teenagers given the government's technological drive. "Coding's not that easy but also not that difficult -- at least not as difficult as you have imagined," said Vita, who lives in Shanghai.


Child's play: Coding booms among Chinese children

#artificialintelligence

Wearing a pair of black-rimmed glasses and a red T-shirt, an eight-year-old Chinese boy is logged in for an online coding lesson -- as the teacher. Vita has set up a coding tutorial channel on the Chinese video streaming site Bilibili since August and has so far garnered nearly 60,000 followers and over one million views. He is among a growing number of children in China who are learning coding even before they enter primary school. The trend has been fuelled by parents' belief that coding skills will be essential for Chinese teenagers given the government's technological drive. 'Coding's not that easy but also not that difficult -- at least not as difficult as you have imagined,' says Vita, who lives in Shanghai.