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The Morning After: Netflix queues up some free samples

Engadget

What do you really need from an alarm clock? Smart displays can be a little extreme to sit by your bedside, but having something that syncs nicely with your phone doesn't hurt. Now Lenovo has followed last year's Google Assistant-connected Smart Clock with this few-frills Smart Clock Essential. As Cherlynn Low points out, its four-inch display doesn't just tell the time, it also shows the current weather and temperature, along with your alarms and other status indicators. Of course, it has microphones for "OK, Google" voice commands, and a three-watt speaker to make sure Mat's voice comes through clearly every morning.


Life Imitates Orwell...

#artificialintelligence

And I am talking Season 3. Or Amazon's hit, The Handmaid's Tale? Do you just binge and veg out or are you like me, and see how easily we could, and are, slipping into these worlds? After watching shows like this I often find myself reflecting back on George Orwell's 1984. It proves more eerily prophetic with each passing year. This Season, I fear, the writers of Westworld are almost scripting our future lives. You may not have caught it, but it is all in there.


'White Mirror' on the wall - what does the future hold for us all ?

#artificialintelligence

It's time to reset, re-create and collaborate on a new paradigm where Compassion and Kindness are the prevailing norms, one where technology is a tool for making humans more humane and creating an Abundant world for the majority. Join us to turn this vision into reality. Let's look into the'White Mirror' … Inspired by Black Mirror (Netflix series) - 'White Mirror' (holding name while we devise a suitable one) provides an immersive flash forward (glimpse/vision) of our Utopian future. In uncertain times (like now), technological disruption and impactful stories can change our mental worldview - our perceptions and eventually our reality. Black Mirror is a powerful show, depicting a dystopian future caused in part by misused evolving technologies.


What Netflix's 'Space Force' gets right (and wrong) about the real Space Force

Mashable

Space Force has landed on Netflix. In response to Donald Trump's 2018 announcement of the United States' newest military branch, Parks and Recreation creator Greg Daniels teamed up with The Office star Steve Carell to bring an intergalactic workplace comedy to Netflix. What follows is a messy, crazy, Beach Boys-infused send-up of military culture and the current administration. Whether you loved it or hated it (we found it meh), this series predicted headlines in a supremely timely and remarkably accurate fashion. What did Netflix's Space Force get right and wrong about the real United States Space Force?


25 technologies that have changed the world

#artificialintelligence

You may even be using one to read this article. Wi-Fi has become essential to our personal and professional lives. The smartphone and the internet we use today wouldn't have been possible without wireless communication technologies such as Wi-Fi. In 1995 if you wanted to "surf" the internet at home, you had to chain yourself to a network cable like it was an extension cord. In 1997, Wi-Fi was invented and released for consumer use.


How Recommender Systems Work (Netflix/Amazon)

#artificialintelligence

Sign in to report inappropriate content. How Amazon, Netflix, Facebook and others predict what you will like.


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

#artificialintelligence

The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.


How technology made us bid farewell to privacy in the last decade

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

In 2011, Apple unveiled its first iPhone with artificial intelligence, a personal assistant named Siri that could answer questions and help keep track of our daily lives. The AI revolution had begun, and it gave way to higher resolution cameras on phones, such as the then-new iPhone 4S, microphones and cameras in the home, everything from connected speakers, security devices, computers and even showers and sinks. By the end of the decade, we were carrying and or living with devices that are capable of tracking our every movement. Counties and states are selling our personal information to data brokers to resell it back to us, in the form of "people search engines." Facebook and Google have refined their tracking skills, in the pursuit of selling targeted advertising to marketers, that many people believe they are listening to us at all times.


Artwork Personalization at Netflix Netflix

#artificialintelligence

ABOUT THE TALK: For many years, the main goal of the Netflix personalized recommendation system has been to get the right titles in front each of our members at the right time. But the job of recommendation does not end there. The homepage should be able to convey to the member enough evidence of why this is a good title for her, especially for shows that the member has never heard of. One way to address this challenge is to personalize the way we portray the titles on our service. Our image personalization engine is driven by online learning and contextual bandits.


Is Netflix about to crack down on users who share logins?

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Netflix said it is'monitoring' people who hand out their passwords to their family and friends. The company's chief product officer, Greg Peters, said it would be looking at'consumer-friendly' ways to stop large groups of people sharing a subscription. The video-streaming service currently costs between £5.99 and £11.99, with the option to watch up to four screens at a time. But as long as they're not all watching at the same time, more people can use the same login as long as they know the username and password. Netflix currently limits users to watching two screens at a time on a normal subscription but, as long as they don't watch at the same time, more people can share the same login details (stock image) Speaking in a video interview about Netflix's earnings in the third quarter of 2019, Mr Peters was asked what the company planned to do about password sharing.