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Facebook will now let you export posts directly to Google Docs and WordPress

Mashable

Ever wish you could easily export all your Facebook posts and notes onto a completely different platform? On Monday, Facebook announced a few new data portability options that allow you to seamlessly transition the content you've written on the social network onto platforms made for writing. Specifically, Facebook has built in an option to transfer your posts and notes into Google Docs as well as two popular blogging platforms, WordPress.com To give people more control and choice over their data, today we're announcing that Facebook posts and notes can be directly transferred to @GoogleDocs, @Blogger and @WordPress via our Transfer Your Information tool:https://t.co/ksHO0oeYq5 Facebook already offers options to export your data to your local hard drive.


Ireland's data privacy agency opens investigation into Facebook data leak

Engadget

Ireland's Data Protection Commission (DPC) is investigating the recent leak of a Facebook user dataset that dates back to 2019. At the start of April, it came out that someone on a hacking forum had made the dataset public, exposing the personal information of about 533 million Facebook users in 106 countries. Depending on the account, there are details about phone numbers, birth dates, email addresses, locations and more. The source of the leak is an oversight Facebook fixed in August 2019. "The DPC, having considered the information provided by Facebook Ireland regarding this matter to date, is of the opinion that one or more provisions of the GDPR and/or the Data Protection Act 2018 may have been, and/or are being, infringed in relation to Facebook Users' personal data," the agency said in a statement spotted by TechCrunch.


Facebook will not notify the half a billion users caught up in its huge data leak, it says

The Independent - Tech

Facebook will not notify the more than half a billion people caught up in a huge leak of personal information, it has said. Over the weekend, it emerged that a vast trove of data on more than 530 million users – containing information including their phone numbers and dates of birth – was being made freely available online. Facebook said that the data was gathered before 2019. It later said that " "malicious actors" had obtained the data prior to September 2019 by "scraping" profiles using a vulnerability in the platform's tool for synching contacts, and that the loophole that allowed them to do so had now been closed. But it said that it did not inform users when the leak happened, and does not have plans to do so now.


Facebook Data Breach: How To Check If You're Part Of The Leak, Preventive Measures To Take

International Business Times

Cybersecurity experts revealed a few days ago that over half a billion Facebook users' personal information have been leaked. It's a gold mine of data, which includes users' full names, birthdays, locations and phone numbers. Although Facebook claims that the actual hack happened a couple of years ago, it won't hurt if users made sure their account is not part of the breach and if they are, they should take a few preventive measures to ensure future incidents as messy as this one won't affect them. Australian Security Researcher and HaveIBeenPawned Founder Tony Hunt recently added the 533 million phone numbers exposed in the Facebook data leak to his website. Those worried if their mobile numbers were part of the leak can visit the site and check if their number is there.


What you need to know about the Facebook data leak

MIT Technology Review

The news: The personal data of 533 million Facebook users in more than 106 countries was found to be freely available online last weekend. The data trove, uncovered by security researcher Alon Gal, includes phone numbers, email addresses, home towns, full names, and birth dates. Initially, Facebook claimed that the data leak was previously reported on in 2019 and that it had patched the vulnerability that caused it that August. But in fact, it appears that Facebook did not properly disclose the breach at the time. It only finally acknowledged it on Tuesday April 6 in a blog post by product management director Mike Clark.


Huge Facebook leak that contains information about 500 million people came from abuse of contacts tool, company says

The Independent - Tech

Facebook says that a vast trove of personal information, uploaded freely to the internet, was harvested as part of a feature gone wrong. The data was not stolen in a hack but instead through malicious users of its "contact importer", it said. Though that feature was intended to allow people to upload their contacts from their phone to Facebook, and find people they might know, malicious actors were able to use it to scrape the personal information of people who were already on the platform. That happened before September 2019, Facebook said in a blog post, and the bug that made it possible has now been fixed. But over the weekend it became clear that the data had become availably publicly online, vastly increasing the risk that anyone involved in it might face. That includes 535 million accounts, which belong to people including chief executive Mark Zuckerberg.


How to check if your Facebook data is being shared by hackers online

Mashable

At this point, there's a good chance your Facebook data has been hacked, sold, leaked, or generally misused by third parties. Now, at least in the case of the latest troubling Facebook-related incident which made the news over the weekend, there's a way to know for sure. On Tuesday, Have I Been Pwned?, a "free resource for anyone to quickly assess if they may have been put at risk due to an online account of theirs having been compromised," announced it had added to its searchable database the 533 million Facebook users' phone numbers that are being swapped around by hackers. The site, run by data breach expert Troy Hunt, lets people input their phone number to check if they're included in the scraped Facebook data set (which includes more than just phone numbers). If so, the site tells victims what was likely exposed, and what steps they can take to protect themselves.


What Really Caused Facebook's 500M-User Data Leak?

WIRED

Since Saturday, a massive trove of Facebook data has circulated publicly, splashing information from roughly 533 million Facebook users across the internet. The data includes things like profile names, Facebook ID numbers, email addresses, and phone numbers. It's all the kind of information that may already have been leaked or scraped from some other source, but it's yet another resource that links all that data together--and ties it to each victim--presenting tidy profiles to scammers, phishers, and spammers on a silver platter. Facebook's initial response was simply that the data was previously reported on in 2019 and that the company patched the underlying vulnerability in August of that year. But a closer look at where, exactly, this data comes from produces a much murkier picture.


What to Know About the Facebook Data Leak

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Data from a 2019 hack of Facebook Inc. was made public in recent days, revealing the phone numbers and personal information of more than a half-billion people. While the data came from a vulnerability of Facebook platforms that the company says it has since fixed, security experts say that scammers could use the information for nefarious purposes like spam email and robocalling. Regulators in Europe have asked Facebook for more details about the data leak. Facebook said Tuesday in a blog post that the data leak reflects the ongoing need to police actions of bad actors on its platform. Here is what you need to know.


Tool checks phone numbers from Facebook data breach

BBC News

Not every piece of data is available for each user but 500 million phone numbers were leaked compared with "only a few million email addresses", Troy Hunt, a security expert who runs HaveIBeenPwned said in a blog on his website.