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Patient Similarity Analysis with Longitudinal Health Data

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Healthcare professionals have long envisioned using the enormous processing powers of computers to discover new facts and medical knowledge locked inside electronic health records. These vast medical archives contain time-resolved information about medical visits, tests and procedures, as well as outcomes, which together form individual patient journeys. By assessing the similarities among these journeys, it is possible to uncover clusters of common disease trajectories with shared health outcomes. The assignment of patient journeys to specific clusters may in turn serve as the basis for personalized outcome prediction and treatment selection. This procedure is a non-trivial computational problem, as it requires the comparison of patient data with multi-dimensional and multi-modal features that are captured at different times and resolutions. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the tools and methods that are used in patient similarity analysis with longitudinal data and discuss its potential for improving clinical decision making.


Classical Statistics and Statistical Learning in Imaging Neuroscience

#artificialintelligence

Single subject prediction of brain disorders in neuroimaging: promises and pitfalls.



Broad Learning for Healthcare

arXiv.org Machine Learning

A broad spectrum of data from different modalities are generated in the healthcare domain every day, including scalar data (e.g., clinical measures collected at hospitals), tensor data (e.g., neuroimages analyzed by research institutes), graph data (e.g., brain connectivity networks), and sequence data (e.g., digital footprints recorded on smart sensors). Capability for modeling information from these heterogeneous data sources is potentially transformative for investigating disease mechanisms and for informing therapeutic interventions. Our works in this thesis attempt to facilitate healthcare applications in the setting of broad learning which focuses on fusing heterogeneous data sources for a variety of synergistic knowledge discovery and machine learning tasks. We are generally interested in computer-aided diagnosis, precision medicine, and mobile health by creating accurate user profiles which include important biomarkers, brain connectivity patterns, and latent representations. In particular, our works involve four different data mining problems with application to the healthcare domain: multi-view feature selection, subgraph pattern mining, brain network embedding, and multi-view sequence prediction.


Mining Brain Networks using Multiple Side Views for Neurological Disorder Identification

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Mining discriminative subgraph patterns from graph data has attracted great interest in recent years. It has a wide variety of applications in disease diagnosis, neuroimaging, etc. Most research on subgraph mining focuses on the graph representation alone. However, in many real-world applications, the side information is available along with the graph data. For example, for neurological disorder identification, in addition to the brain networks derived from neuroimaging data, hundreds of clinical, immunologic, serologic and cognitive measures may also be documented for each subject. These measures compose multiple side views encoding a tremendous amount of supplemental information for diagnostic purposes, yet are often ignored. In this paper, we study the problem of discriminative subgraph selection using multiple side views and propose a novel solution to find an optimal set of subgraph features for graph classification by exploring a plurality of side views. We derive a feature evaluation criterion, named gSide, to estimate the usefulness of subgraph patterns based upon side views. Then we develop a branch-and-bound algorithm, called gMSV, to efficiently search for optimal subgraph features by integrating the subgraph mining process and the procedure of discriminative feature selection. Empirical studies on graph classification tasks for neurological disorders using brain networks demonstrate that subgraph patterns selected by the multi-side-view guided subgraph selection approach can effectively boost graph classification performances and are relevant to disease diagnosis.