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Army fires tank-killing robots armed with Javelin missiles

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. The U.S. Army will soon operate robots able to destroy enemy armored vehicles with anti-tank missiles, surveil warzones under heavy enemy fire and beam back identified targeting details in seconds due to rapid progress with several new armed robot programs. Several of the new platforms now operate with a Kongsberg-built first-of-its-kind wireless fire control architecture for a robotic armored turret with machine guns, Javelin Anti-Tank Missiles and robot-mounted 30mm cannon selected by the Army to arm its fast-emerging Robotic Combat Vehicles. These now-in-development robotic systems are intended to network with manned vehicles in high-risk combat operations.


With artificial intelligence, every soldier is a counter-drone operator

#artificialintelligence

Gabriel Silva/Army). With the addition of artificial intelligence and machine learning, the aim is …


With artificial intelligence, every soldier is a counter-drone operator

#artificialintelligence

With the addition of artificial intelligence and machine learning, the aim is to make every soldier, regardless of job specialty, capable of identifying and knocking down threatening drones. While much of that mission used to reside mostly in the air defense community, those attacks can strike any infantry squad or tank battalion. The goal is to reduce cognitive burden and operator stress when dealing with an array of aerial threats that now plague units of any size, in any theater. "Everyone is counter-UAS," said Col. Marc Pelini, division chief for capabilities and requirements at the Joint Counter-Unmanned Aircraft Systems Office, or JCO. Army units aren't ready to defeat aerial drones, the study shows.


Army partners with University of Illinois on autonomous drone swarm technology

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Army researchers are working with the University of Illinois Chicago on unmanned technology for recharging drone swarms. The university has been awarded a four-year, $8 million cooperative agreement "to develop foundational science in two critical propulsion and power technology areas for powering future families of unmanned aircraft systems," according to a statement released by the Army Research Laboratory. "This collaborative program will help small battery-powered drones autonomously return from military missions to unmanned ground vehicles for recharging," the Army added.


The US Army wants to build an autonomous drone charging system

Engadget

The US Army is looking to build an autonomous charging system that can support hundreds of drones. It has funded a four-year research project with the ultimate aim of kitting out ground-based vehicles with charging stations that swarms of drones can fly to by themselves. The University of Illinois Chicago landed an $8 million contract from the Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory. Researchers will work on a system that will enable small drones to determine the location of the closest charging station, travel there and juice up before returning to their mission. The university is working on algorithms to help the drones determine the best route to a charging port.


Artificial Intelligence Helps Define Army's Future

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence technology tested during the Army's Project Convergence exercise largely met expectations and will help transform the way the Army fights in the future, officials say. Army officials held a media roundtable September 23 to discuss lessons learned during the recently completed Project Convergence, which is designed to ensure the Army, as part of the joint force, can rapidly and continuously converge effects across all domains--air, land, maritime, space and cyberspace--to overmatch adversaries in both competition and actual conflict. A key part of the Army's massive modernization effort, the project focuses on people, weapons systems, information, command and control, and terrain to assess areas of advancement and identify areas for improvement. Artificial intelligence, or AI, played a role, along with autonomy and robotics, which Gen. John Murray, USA, commanding general, Army Futures Command, describes as three key technologies for the Army's future. Gen. Murray compares the trio of technological capabilities to those that gave the Germans an initial advantage during World War II.


Robot Generals: Will They Make Better Decisions than Humans or Worse? - Global Research

#artificialintelligence

With Covid-19 incapacitating startling numbers of U.S. service members and modern weapons proving increasingly lethal, the American military is relying ever more frequently on intelligent robots to conduct hazardous combat operations. Such devices, known in the military as "autonomous weapons systems," include robotic sentries, battlefield-surveillance drones, and autonomous submarines. So far, in other words, robotic devices are merely replacing standard weaponry on conventional battlefields. Now, however, in a giant leap of faith, the Pentagon is seeking to take this process to an entirely new level -- by replacing not just ordinary soldiers and their weapons, but potentially admirals and generals with robotic systems. Admittedly, those systems are still in the development stage, but the Pentagon is now rushing their future deployment as a matter of national urgency.


Army Researchers Dream New Self-Healing Material Will Lead to 'Terminator' Technology

#artificialintelligence

U.S. Army researchers have teamed with Texas A&M University to create a new polymer material that can shape-shift and autonomously heal itself as part of a research effort to improve future unmanned air and robotic vehicles. In early research, the first-of-its-kind, 3D-printable epoxy-based material can respond to stimuli, and researchers hope it will one day have embedded intelligence allowing it to adapt to its environment without any external control, according to a news release from Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's (CCDC) Army Research Laboratory. "We want a system of materials to simultaneously provide structure, sensing and response," said Frank Gardea, an aerospace engineer and principal investigator for the effort, at the CCDC. Gardea envisions a future platform, suitable for air and ground missions, with the "reconfiguration characteristics of the T-1000 character in the Hollywood film, 'Terminator 2.'" The hit film featured a Terminator made of liquid-metal that could form its arms into stabbing weapons and heal itself after being shot with everything from a 12-gauge shotgun to a 40mm grenade launcher. So far, the material has responded to temperature, which researchers first selected because of its ease of use during laboratory testing.


The U.S. Military Is Building Voice-Controlled War Robots

#artificialintelligence

Welcome to General Intelligence, OneZero's weekly dive into the A.I. news and research that matters. War robots today take just too much darn time to control. I know it, you know it, and the U.S. Army knows it. That's why its research branch is cooking up a system that would allow soldiers to give orders to small robotic cars by speaking naturally, as opposed to using specific commands. The robots would be able to understand the soldiers' intent and complete the given task, according to an Army press release.


Indian Army: Amid LAC face-off, Army to study lasers, robotics & AI for warfare

#artificialintelligence

NEW DELHI: The Army is now undertaking a major study headed by a senior Lt-General on advanced "niche and disruptive warfare technologies", which range from drone swarms, robotics, lasers and loiter munitions to artificial intelligence, big data analysis and algorithmic warfare. Sources on Friday said the aim of the "holistic study", which comes amidst the ongoing military confrontation in eastern Ladakh with China, is to bolster the conventional war-fighting capabilities of the 13-lakh strong Army as well as prepare for "non-kinetic and non-combat" warfare in the years ahead. China, of course, has been assiduously working to develop futuristic warfare technologies, like artificial intelligence (AI)-powered lethal autonomous weapon systems, towards its overall endeavor to usher in a major "revolution in military affairs (RMA) with Chinese characteristics". Indian Army's new land warfare doctrine in 2018 had stressed the need to sharpen the entire war-fighting strategy, ranging from creation of agile integrated battle groups (IBGs) and expansive cyber-warfare capabilities to induction plans for launch-on-demand micro satellites, directed-energy weapons like lasers, AI, robotics and the like. The new IBGs, after a similar study, have already started to take initial shape as self-contained fighting formations that can mobilize fast and hit hard.