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What is RIVA Speech clients container in NVIDIA GPU Cloud? - World-class cloud from India

#artificialintelligence

The corporate world has struggled with custom voices that resonate with their brand voice. While the technology has made waves in various areas, speech technology was still under experimentation. Organisations wanting to create'human-like' voices for their brand. The brand voice forms a major part of an organization's branding strategy, and it is crucial to get it right, especially for the industries like call centers, where human-like voices are important. In industries where voice-over is a crucial part of the businesses, AI-powered speech solutions are appreciated for various reasons.


Bongo Learn provides real-time feedback to improve learning outcomes with Amazon Transcribe

#artificialintelligence

Real-time feedback helps drive learning. This is especially important for designing presentations, learning new languages, and strengthening other essential skills that are critical to succeed in today's workplace. However, many students and lifelong learners lack access to effective face-to-face instruction to hone these skills. In addition, with the rapid adoption of remote learning, educators are seeking more effective ways to engage their students and provide feedback and guidance in online learning environments. Bongo is filling that gap using video-based engagement and personalized feedback.


Conversational Agents: Theory and Applications

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In this chapter, we provide a review of conversational agents (CAs), discussing chatbots, intended for casual conversation with a user, as well as task-oriented agents that generally engage in discussions intended to reach one or several specific goals, often (but not always) within a specific domain. We also consider the concept of embodied conversational agents, briefly reviewing aspects such as character animation and speech processing. The many different approaches for representing dialogue in CAs are discussed in some detail, along with methods for evaluating such agents, emphasizing the important topics of accountability and interpretability. A brief historical overview is given, followed by an extensive overview of various applications, especially in the fields of health and education. We end the chapter by discussing benefits and potential risks regarding the societal impact of current and future CA technology.


Challenges of Artificial Intelligence -- From Machine Learning and Computer Vision to Emotional Intelligence

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) has become a part of everyday conversation and our lives. It is considered as the new electricity that is revolutionizing the world. AI is heavily invested in both industry and academy. However, there is also a lot of hype in the current AI debate. AI based on so-called deep learning has achieved impressive results in many problems, but its limits are already visible. AI has been under research since the 1940s, and the industry has seen many ups and downs due to over-expectations and related disappointments that have followed. The purpose of this book is to give a realistic picture of AI, its history, its potential and limitations. We believe that AI is a helper, not a ruler of humans. We begin by describing what AI is and how it has evolved over the decades. After fundamentals, we explain the importance of massive data for the current mainstream of artificial intelligence. The most common representations for AI, methods, and machine learning are covered. In addition, the main application areas are introduced. Computer vision has been central to the development of AI. The book provides a general introduction to computer vision, and includes an exposure to the results and applications of our own research. Emotions are central to human intelligence, but little use has been made in AI. We present the basics of emotional intelligence and our own research on the topic. We discuss super-intelligence that transcends human understanding, explaining why such achievement seems impossible on the basis of present knowledge,and how AI could be improved. Finally, a summary is made of the current state of AI and what to do in the future. In the appendix, we look at the development of AI education, especially from the perspective of contents at our own university.


Speech recognition works for kids, and it's about time – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

Speech recognition technology is finally working for kids. That wasn't the case back in 1999, when my colleagues at Scholastic Education and I launched a reading intervention program called READ 180. We'd hoped to incorporate voice-enabled capabilities: Children would read to a computer program, which would provide real-time feedback on their fluency and literacy. Teachers, in turn, would receive information about their students' progress. Unfortunately, our idea was 20 years ahead of the technology, and we moved ahead with READ 180 without speech-recognition capabilities.


An Edtech User's Glossary to Speech Recognition and AI in the Classroom - EdSurge News

#artificialintelligence

In a recent white paper, former Scholastic president of education Margery Mayer dubbed 2021 the "year of speech recognition" in education. And she may be right: A spike in adoption by edtech developers in the first half of this year reflects the recognition that technology holds the potential to not only create more engaging learning experiences for students, but to transform the very practice of early literacy instruction altogether. In prior years, such a vision may have seemed far fetched. But as EdSurge has previously noted, the science behind speech recognition for children has begun to come of age, enabling educational applications that have piqued the interest of edtech developers, educators and researchers alike. Part of what has enabled the growing use of speech recognition in education is the availability today of technology built specifically to cater to kids' voices and behaviors.


Open-world Machine Learning: Applications, Challenges, and Opportunities

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Traditional machine learning especially supervised learning follows the assumptions of closed-world learning i.e., for each testing class a training class is available. However, such machine learning models fail to identify the classes which were not available during training time. These classes can be referred to as unseen classes. Whereas, open-world machine learning deals with arbitrary inputs (data with unseen classes) to machine learning systems. Moreover, traditional machine learning is static learning which is not appropriate for an active environment where the perspective and sources, and/or volume of data are changing rapidly. In this paper, first, we present an overview of open-world learning with importance to the real-world context. Next, different dimensions of open-world learning are explored and discussed. The area of open-world learning gained the attention of the research community in the last decade only. We have searched through different online digital libraries and scrutinized the work done in the last decade. This paper presents a systematic review of various techniques for open-world machine learning. It also presents the research gaps, challenges, and future directions in open-world learning. This paper will help researchers to understand the comprehensive developments of open-world learning and the likelihoods to extend the research in suitable areas. It will also help to select applicable methodologies and datasets to explore this further.


The AI Index 2021 Annual Report

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Welcome to the fourth edition of the AI Index Report. This year we significantly expanded the amount of data available in the report, worked with a broader set of external organizations to calibrate our data, and deepened our connections with the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI). The AI Index Report tracks, collates, distills, and visualizes data related to artificial intelligence. Its mission is to provide unbiased, rigorously vetted, and globally sourced data for policymakers, researchers, executives, journalists, and the general public to develop intuitions about the complex field of AI. The report aims to be the most credible and authoritative source for data and insights about AI in the world.


Educational Content Linking for Enhancing Learning Need Remediation in MOOCs

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Since its introduction in 2011, there have been over 4000 MOOCs on various subjects on the Web, serving over 35 million learners. MOOCs have shown the ability to democratize knowledge dissemination and bring the best education in the world to every learner. However, the disparate distances between participants, the size of the learner population, and the heterogeneity of the learners' backgrounds make it extremely difficult for instructors to interact with the learners in a timely manner, which adversely affects learning experience. To address the challenges, in this thesis, we propose a framework: educational content linking. By linking and organizing pieces of learning content scattered in various course materials into an easily accessible structure, we hypothesize that this framework can provide learners guidance and improve content navigation. Since most instruction and knowledge acquisition in MOOCs takes place when learners are surveying course materials, better content navigation may help learners find supporting information to resolve their confusion and thus improve learning outcome and experience. To support our conjecture, we present end-to-end studies to investigate our framework around two research questions: 1) can manually generated linking improve learning? 2) can learning content be generated with machine learning methods? For studying the first question, we built an interface that present learning materials and visualize the linking among them simultaneously. We found the interface enables users to search for desired course materials more efficiently, and retain more concepts more readily. For the second question, we propose an automatic content linking algorithm based on conditional random fields. We demonstrate that automatically generated linking can still lead to better learning, although the magnitude of the improvement over the unlinked interface is smaller.


A learning perspective on the emergence of abstractions: the curious case of phonemes

arXiv.org Machine Learning

In the present paper we use a range of modeling techniques to investigate whether an abstract phone could emerge from exposure to speech sounds. We test two opposing principles regarding the development of language knowledge in linguistically untrained language users: Memory-Based Learning (MBL) and Error-Correction Learning (ECL). A process of generalization underlies the abstractions linguists operate with, and we probed whether MBL and ECL could give rise to a type of language knowledge that resembles linguistic abstractions. Each model was presented with a significant amount of pre-processed speech produced by one speaker. We assessed the consistency or stability of what the models have learned and their ability to give rise to abstract categories. Both types of models fare differently with regard to these tests. We show that ECL learning models can learn abstractions and that at least part of the phone inventory can be reliably identified from the input.