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Australians have little trust in Artificial intelligence, new study shows

#artificialintelligence

A new study has shown that Australians are generally unwilling to sign off on wide-spread use of Artificial intelligence (AI), with less than a quarter of those surveyed approving of the growing technology. The study, conducted by the University of Queensland in partnership with KPMG, shows while 42 per cent generally accept it only 16 per cent approve of AI. More than half of Australians know little about AI and many are unaware that it is being used in everyday applications, like social media. "The benefits and promise of AI for society and business are undeniable," said Professor Nicole Gillespie, KPMG Chair in Organisational Trust and Professor of Management at the University of Queensland Business School. "AI helps people make better predictions and informed decisions, it enables innovation, and can deliver productivity gains, improve efficiency, and drive lower costs. Through such measures as AI-driven fraud detection, it is helping protect physical and financial security โ€“ and facilitating the current global fight against COVID-19."



AI bot "ClaRAN" can spot radio galaxy too. โ€“ TechGraph

#artificialintelligence

An artificial intelligence (AI) programme used to recognize faces on Facebook can also identify galaxies in deep space, scientists said Wednesday. The AI bot named ClaRAN scans images taken by radio telescopes, said researchers from the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) in Australia. Its job is to spot radio galaxies -- galaxies that emit powerful radio jets from supermassive black holes at their centers, according to the research published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Black holes are found at the center of most, if not all, galaxies. "These supermassive black holes occasionally burp out jets that can be seen with a radio telescope," said Ivy Wong from The University of Western Australia node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR).


'New artificial intelligence bot can recognise galaxies'

#artificialintelligence

An artificial intelligence (AI) programme used to recognise faces on Facebook can also identify galaxies in deep space, scientists said on Wednesday. The AI bot named ClaRAN scans images taken by radio telescopes, said researchers from the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) in Australia. Its job is to spot radio galaxies -- galaxies that emit powerful radio jets from supermassive black holes at their centres, according to the research published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Black holes are found at the centre of most, if not all, galaxies. "These supermassive black holes occasionally burp out jets that can be seen with a radio telescope," said Ivy Wong from The University of Western Australia node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR).


Probabilistic Graphical Models for Credibility Analysis in Evolving Online Communities

arXiv.org Machine Learning

One of the major hurdles preventing the full exploitation of information from online communities is the widespread concern regarding the quality and credibility of user-contributed content. Prior works in this domain operate on a static snapshot of the community, making strong assumptions about the structure of the data (e.g., relational tables), or consider only shallow features for text classification. To address the above limitations, we propose probabilistic graphical models that can leverage the joint interplay between multiple factors in online communities --- like user interactions, community dynamics, and textual content --- to automatically assess the credibility of user-contributed online content, and the expertise of users and their evolution with user-interpretable explanation. To this end, we devise new models based on Conditional Random Fields for different settings like incorporating partial expert knowledge for semi-supervised learning, and handling discrete labels as well as numeric ratings for fine-grained analysis. This enables applications such as extracting reliable side-effects of drugs from user-contributed posts in healthforums, and identifying credible content in news communities. Online communities are dynamic, as users join and leave, adapt to evolving trends, and mature over time. To capture this dynamics, we propose generative models based on Hidden Markov Model, Latent Dirichlet Allocation, and Brownian Motion to trace the continuous evolution of user expertise and their language model over time. This allows us to identify expert users and credible content jointly over time, improving state-of-the-art recommender systems by explicitly considering the maturity of users. This also enables applications such as identifying helpful product reviews, and detecting fake and anomalous reviews with limited information.


The cougar effect: Women get far less picky about a partner's intelligence the older they get

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Most online daters prefer to contact people with the same level of education as them, but a new study suggests that as people grow older they become less picky about it. Researchers based at Queensland's University of Technology, Australia, analyzed the online dating behaviors of 41,000 Australians aged between 18 and 80. The researchers said that humans usually look for similar characteristics and traits in a partner in areas such as age, attractiveness and culture, however, the internet has changed this process. Researchers based at Queensland's University of Technology, Australia, analyzed the online dating behaviors of 41,000 Australians aged between 18 and 80 The researchers analyzed the behaviors of people using the online dating website'RSVP' during a four month period in 2016. Mr Stephen Whyte, a behavioural economist and co-author of the study, said: 'Selecting a mate can be one of the largest psychological and economic decisions a person can make and has long been the subject of social science research across a range of disciplines.


A third of wearable devices abandoned by consumers: Gartner

ZDNet

Almost a third of smartwatches and fitness trackers, 29 and 30 percent respectively, are abandoned by their owners, according to a new study by analyst firm Gartner. More than 9,500 consumers from Australia, the United Kingdom, and United States, were surveyed between June to August about their attitudes towards wearables as well as their purchasing behaviours around smartwatches, fitness trackers, and virtual reality glasses. Windows 10 Creators Update: What's on tap for Spring 2017 for business users Facebook's Workplace: How one company is making it work for them Amazon Go: Here are the takeaways business tech execs need to know IBM Watson AI: These firms are fighting cybercrime using cognitive computing Windows 10 Creators Update: What's on tap for Spring 2017 for business users Facebook's Workplace: How one company is making it work for them Those who abandoned their devices did so because they didn't find them useful, got bored of them, or they broke, according to the survey. "Dropout from device usage is a serious problem for the industry," said Angela McIntyre, research director at Gartner. "The abandonment rate is quite high relative to the usage rate.