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Launch of a new standard for AI security in Singapore

AIHub

The adoption of artificial intelligence (AI) in various applications, from self-driving autonomous vehicles to AI-assisted medical diagnoses, has accelerated in recent years. From 2018 to 2020, there was a five-fold increase globally in the percentage of organisations deploying AI. While the adoption of AI brings numerous benefits, cybersecurity threats such as hacking pose a significant threat to AI systems, especially in applications where hackers may gain access to confidential information or cause automated systems to malfunction. Answering the call to protect the integrity of AI programmes and create trust in AI solutions, a team of NTU researchers and AI leaders has launched a new standard on AI security. Unveiled on 16 March 2022 at the Al Security Standard Launch Singapore TR 99:2021 Growth opportunities for government & industry adopting trustworthy Al, and published by Enterprise Singapore's Standards Consortium, the standard was developed from research led by NTU scientists Prof Liu Yang of NTU's School of Computer Science and Engineering, former research fellow Dr Xiaofei Xie and PhD candidate Mr David Berend.


Conversational AI Platform for Financial Services

#artificialintelligence

Active.Ai is a Singapore based Fintech startup with an innovation lab in Bengaluru, using artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver Conversational AI Banking services. We help banks redefine their digital strategy for the future, bringing in automation and insightful customer engagement.


Time To Stop Trying to Fix AI Bias

#artificialintelligence

Bias gives AI a bad reputation, and there are good reasons for that. With the rising use of AI to recommend products, screen resumes, rate credit risk scoring, and more, bias in AI will impact our businesses and lives. "Biases within AI tools are potentially dangerous for Asia -- but biases about AI's use in Asia could be even more so," stated MIT Technology Review in its report Asia's AI agenda The ethics of AI. The report surveyed 871 senior business leaders in 13 economies within Asia. These participants in the AI ecosystem are aware of the embedded biases -- race, gender, or socioeconomic status -- within AI tools.


Man versus machine: Human beings losing out as AI coldly fires under-performing workers

#artificialintelligence

SINGAPORE - The science fiction trope of artificial intelligence (AI) going against human beings has been creeping into real life, with some businesses engaged in "robo firings". AI ethics experts said firing workers using AI is problematic partly because algorithms, at this time, cannot fully model human thinking and replace human intelligence. The Verge reported in 2019 that American e-commerce giant Amazon could automatically fire warehouse workers based on productivity metrics. A Californian law kicked in this year prohibiting warehouse bosses from imposing productivity quotas that prevent staff from, for instance, taking a break. Amazon declined to say what changes it would make to comply, Bloomberg reported last December.


Singapore releases software toolkit to guide financial sector on AI ethics

ZDNet

Singapore has released a software toolkit aimed at helping financial institutions ensure they are using artificial intelligence (AI) responsibly. Five whitepapers also have been issued to guide them on assessing their deployment based on predefined principles. The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) said the documents detailed methodologies for incorporating the FEAT principles--of Fairness, Ethics, Accountability, and Transparency--into the use of AI within the financial services sector. The whitepapers were developed by the Veritas consortium, which is part of Singapore's national AI strategy and comprises 27 industry players that include Amazon Web Services, Bank of China, Bank of Singapore, Google Cloud, Goldman Sachs, OCBC Bank, and Unionbank of the Philippines. Multi-ethnic Asian country needs to take special care navigating its use of artificial intelligence in some areas, specifically, law enforcement, as well as recognise that fostering confidence in AI requires establishing public trust in different aspects of its society.


Singapore: UNESCO members adopt a global agreement on the ethics of artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

On 25 November 2021, the United Nations (UN) announced that all 193 member states of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), including Singapore, adopted a first-of-its-kind global agreement on the ethics of artificial intelligence (AI). The agreement focuses on the broader ethical implications of AI systems in relation to education, science, culture, communication and information; and articulates common values and principles to assist in the creation of legal infrastructure for the healthy development of AI. The rise of AI is well documented. AI is present in everyday life, where UNESCO has recognized that AI supports the decision-making of governments and the private sector; and helps to combat global problems such as climate change and world hunger. As AI becomes increasingly used and relied upon, it is likely that further standards and regulations will emerge as governments and agencies begin to pay more attention to the development of AI.


Artificial Intelligence and Big Data in the Indo-Pacific

#artificialintelligence

What is the impact of artificial intelligence (AI) and big data on societies in the Indo-Pacific? How are countries using AI and big data to enhance their national security and advance their national interests? And what are the major regulatory issues? For a perspective on these and other matters, Jongsoo Lee interviewed Simon Chesterman, dean and provost's chair professor of the National University of Singapore Faculty of Law and senior director of AI Governance at AI Singapore. What are nations in the Indo-Pacific doing to develop their artificial intelligence (AI) and big data capabilities?


Driving AI innovation in tandem with regulation – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

The European Commission announced first-of-its-kind legislation regulating the use of artificial intelligence in April. This unleashed criticism that the regulations could slow AI innovation, hamstringing Europe in its competition with the U.S. and China for leadership in AI. For example, Andrew McAfee wrote an article titled "EU proposals to regulate AI are only going to hinder innovation." Anticipating this criticism and mindful of the example of GDPR, where Europe's thought-leadership position didn't necessarily translate into data-related innovation, the EC has tried to address AI innovation directly by publishing a new Coordinated Plan on AI. Released in conjunction with the proposed regulations, the plan is full of initiatives intended to help the EU become a leader in AI technology.


Driving AI innovation in tandem with regulation – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

The European Commission announced first-of-its-kind legislation regulating the use of artificial intelligence in April. This unleashed criticism that the regulations could slow AI innovation, hamstringing Europe in its competition with the U.S. and China for leadership in AI. For example, Andrew McAfee wrote an article titled "EU proposals to regulate AI are only going to hinder innovation." Anticipating this criticism and mindful of the example of GDPR, where Europe's thought-leadership position didn't necessarily translate into data-related innovation, the EC has tried to address AI innovation directly by publishing a new Coordinated Plan on AI. Released in conjunction with the proposed regulations, the plan is full of initiatives intended to help the EU become a leader in AI technology.


Every country must decide own definition of acceptable AI use

ZDNet

Every country including Singapore will need to decide what it deems to be acceptable uses of artificial intelligence (AI), including whether the use of facial recognition technology in public spaces should be accepted or outlawed. Discussions should seek to balance market opportunities and ensuring ethical use of AI, so such guidelines are usable and easily adopted. Above all, governments should seek to drive public debate and gather feedback so AI regulations would be relevant for their local population, said Ieva Martinkenaite, head of analytics and AI for Telenor Research. The Norwegian telecommunications company applies AI and machine learning models to deliver more personalised customer and targeted sales campaigns, achieve better operational efficiencies, and optimise its network resources. For instance, the technology helps identify customer usage patterns in different locations and this data is tapped to reduce or power off antennas where usage is low.