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How to Explain AI, ML, and NLP to Business Leaders in Plain Language - InformationWeek

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When I visit with non-IT corporate executives and ask them about artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML) and natural language processing (NLP), they tell me that they have initiatives underway. But they don't exactly know what AI, ML, and NLP are. Trying to explain what AI, ML, and NLP are, how they work, and how they deliver results for the business isn't easy. Yet, all of these technologies have prominent roles in analytics as IT deploys them. It's incumbent upon CIOs and IT leaders to find ways to break down these technologies and their business deliverables in plain language for non-technical stakeholders.


AI in Analytics: Powering the Future of Data Analytics - Dataconomy

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Augmented analytics: the combination of AI and analytics is the latest innovation in data analytics. For organizations, data analysis has evolved from hiring "unicorn" data scientists – to having smart applications that provide actionable insights for decision-making in just a few clicks, thanks to AI. Augmenting by definition means making something greater in strength or value. Augmented analytics, also known as AI-driven analytics, helps in identifying hidden patterns in large data sets and uncovers trends and actionable insights. It leverages technologies such as Analytics, Machine Learning, and Natural Language Generation to automate data management processes and assist with the hard parts of analytics. The capabilities of AI are poised to augment analytics activities and enable companies to internalize data-driven decision-making while enabling everyone in the organization to easily deal with data.


Google: Learn cloud skills for free with our new training tracks

ZDNet

Google is offering a free course for people who are on the hunt for skills to use containers, big data and machine-learning models in Google Cloud. The initial batch of courses consists of four tracks aimed at data analysts, cloud architects, data scientists and machine-learning engineers. The January 2021 course offers a fast track to understand key tools for engineers and architects to use in Google Cloud. It includes a series on getting started in Google Cloud, another focussing on its BigQuery data warehouse, one that delves into the Kubernetes engine for managing containers, another for the Anthos application management platform, and a final chapter on Google's standard interfaces for natural language processing and computer vision AI. Participants need to sign up to Google's "skills challenge" and will be given 30 days' free access to Google Cloud labs.


Mining Knowledge Graphs From Incident Reports

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Incident management is a critical part of the DevOps processes for developing and operating large-scale services in the cloud. Incident reports filed by customers are largely unstructured making any automated diagnosis or mitigation non-trivial. It requires on-call engineers to parse verbose reports to understand the issue and locate key information. Prior work has looked into extraction of key attributes or entities like error codes, tenant Ids, stack traces, etc. from incident and bug reports. Although a flat list of entities is informative, to unlock the full potential of knowledge extraction, it is necessary to provide context to these entities. For instance, the relations between the real-world concepts or objects that these entities represent in otherwise unstructured data is useful for downstream tasks like incident linking, triaging and mitigation. With this additional context, entities are transformed from "Strings" to "Things". In this work, we present an approach to mine and score binary entity relations from co-occurring entity pairs. We evaluate binary relations extracted and show that our approach has a high precision of 0.9. Further, we construct knowledge graphs automatically and show that the implicit knowledge in the graph can be used to mine and rank relevant entities for distinct incidents, by mapping entities to clusters of incident titles.


Socially Responsible AI Algorithms: Issues, Purposes, and Challenges

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In the current era, people and society have grown increasingly reliant on Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies. AI has the potential to drive us towards a future in which all of humanity flourishes. It also comes with substantial risks for oppression and calamity. Discussions about whether we should (re)trust AI have repeatedly emerged in recent years and in many quarters, including industry, academia, health care, services, and so on. Technologists and AI researchers have a responsibility to develop trustworthy AI systems. They have responded with great efforts of designing more responsible AI algorithms. However, existing technical solutions are narrow in scope and have been primarily directed towards algorithms for scoring or classification tasks, with an emphasis on fairness and unwanted bias. To build long-lasting trust between AI and human beings, we argue that the key is to think beyond algorithmic fairness and connect major aspects of AI that potentially cause AI's indifferent behavior. In this survey, we provide a systematic framework of Socially Responsible AI Algorithms that aims to examine the subjects of AI indifference and the need for socially responsible AI algorithms, define the objectives, and introduce the means by which we may achieve these objectives. We further discuss how to leverage this framework to improve societal well-being through protection, information, and prevention/mitigation.


Explainable Artificial Intelligence (XAI): An Engineering Perspective

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The remarkable advancements in Deep Learning (DL) algorithms have fueled enthusiasm for using Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies in almost every domain; however, the opaqueness of these algorithms put a question mark on their applications in safety-critical systems. In this regard, the `explainability' dimension is not only essential to both explain the inner workings of black-box algorithms, but it also adds accountability and transparency dimensions that are of prime importance for regulators, consumers, and service providers. eXplainable Artificial Intelligence (XAI) is the set of techniques and methods to convert the so-called black-box AI algorithms to white-box algorithms, where the results achieved by these algorithms and the variables, parameters, and steps taken by the algorithm to reach the obtained results, are transparent and explainable. To complement the existing literature on XAI, in this paper, we take an `engineering' approach to illustrate the concepts of XAI. We discuss the stakeholders in XAI and describe the mathematical contours of XAI from engineering perspective. Then we take the autonomous car as a use-case and discuss the applications of XAI for its different components such as object detection, perception, control, action decision, and so on. This work is an exploratory study to identify new avenues of research in the field of XAI.


Neurocognitive Informatics Manifesto

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Theoretical and abstract approaches to information have made great advances, but human information processing is still unmatched in many areas, including information management, representation and understanding. Neurocognitive informatics is a new, emerging field that should help to improve the matching of artificial and natural systems, and inspire better computational algorithms to solve problems that are still beyond the reach of machines. In this position paper examples of neurocognitive inspirations and promising directions in this area are given.


Etat de l'art sur l'application des bandits multi-bras

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The Multi-armed bandit offer the advantage to learn and exploit the already learnt knowledge at the same time. This capability allows this approach to be applied in different domains, going from clinical trials where the goal is investigating the effects of different experimental treatments while minimizing patient losses, to adaptive routing where the goal is to minimize the delays in a network. This article provides a review of the recent results on applying bandit to real-life scenario and summarize the state of the art for each of these fields. Different techniques has been proposed to solve this problem setting, like epsilon-greedy, Upper confident bound (UCB) and Thompson Sampling (TS). We are showing here how this algorithms were adapted to solve the different problems of exploration exploitation.


Passenger Mobility Prediction via Representation Learning for Dynamic Directed and Weighted Graph

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In recent years, ride-hailing services have been increasingly prevalent as they provide huge convenience for passengers. As a fundamental problem, the timely prediction of passenger demands in different regions is vital for effective traffic flow control and route planning. As both spatial and temporal patterns are indispensable passenger demand prediction, relevant research has evolved from pure time series to graph-structured data for modeling historical passenger demand data, where a snapshot graph is constructed for each time slot by connecting region nodes via different relational edges (e.g., origin-destination relationship, geographical distance, etc.). Consequently, the spatiotemporal passenger demand records naturally carry dynamic patterns in the constructed graphs, where the edges also encode important information about the directions and volume (i.e., weights) of passenger demands between two connected regions. However, existing graph-based solutions fail to simultaneously consider those three crucial aspects of dynamic, directed, and weighted (DDW) graphs, leading to limited expressiveness when learning graph representations for passenger demand prediction. Therefore, we propose a novel spatiotemporal graph attention network, namely Gallat (Graph prediction with all attention) as a solution. In Gallat, by comprehensively incorporating those three intrinsic properties of DDW graphs, we build three attention layers to fully capture the spatiotemporal dependencies among different regions across all historical time slots. Moreover, the model employs a subtask to conduct pretraining so that it can obtain accurate results more quickly. We evaluate the proposed model on real-world datasets, and our experimental results demonstrate that Gallat outperforms the state-of-the-art approaches.


Top 100 Artificial Intelligence Companies in the World

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is not just a buzzword, but a crucial part of the technology landscape. AI is changing every industry and business function, which results in increased interest in its applications, subdomains and related fields. This makes AI companies the top leaders driving the technology swift. AI helps us to optimise and automate crucial business processes, gather essential data and transform the world, one step at a time. From Google and Amazon to Apple and Microsoft, every major tech company is dedicating resources to breakthroughs in artificial intelligence. As big enterprises are busy acquiring or merging with other emerging inventions, small AI companies are also working hard to develop their own intelligent technology and services. By leveraging artificial intelligence, organizations get an innovative edge in the digital age. AI consults are also working to provide companies with expertise that can help them grow. In this digital era, AI is also a significant place for investment. AI companies are constantly developing the latest products to provide the simplest solutions. Henceforth, Analytics Insight brings you the list of top 100 AI companies that are leading the technology drive towards a better tomorrow. AEye develops advanced vision hardware, software, and algorithms that act as the eyes and visual cortex of autonomous vehicles. AEye is an artificial perception pioneer and creator of iDAR, a new form of intelligent data collection that acts as the eyes and visual cortex of autonomous vehicles. Since its demonstration of its solid state LiDAR scanner in 2013, AEye has pioneered breakthroughs in intelligent sensing. Their mission was to acquire the most information with the fewest ones and zeros. This would allow AEye to drive the automotive industry into the next realm of autonomy. Algorithmia invented the AI Layer.