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Social & Ethical Issues


BMW, Pasqal Apply Quantum Computing to Car Design, Manufacturing - EE Times Europe

#artificialintelligence

Car manufacturer BMW and quantum computing technology developer Pasqal have entered a new phase of collaboration to analyze the applicability of quantum computational algorithms to metal forming applications modeling. The automotive industry is one of the most demanding industrial environments, and quantum computing could solve some of the key design and manufacturing issues. According to a report by McKinsey, automotive will be one of the primary value pools for quantum computing, with a high impact noticeable by about 2025. The consulting firm also expects a significant economic impact of related technologies for the automotive industry, estimated at $2 billion to $3 billion, by 2030. Volkswagen Group led the way with the launch of a dedicated quantum computing research team back in 2016.


Preparing the Global Workforce for AI Disruption

#artificialintelligence

Within the next decade, the world will see a major disruption of the workforce due to advances in artificial intelligence (AI) technology. According to a McKinsey Global Institute report, 375 million workers, or about 14 percent of the global workforce, may be required to shift occupations as digitization, automation, and AI technologies start to take over the workspace. In a separate 2018 report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), half of the global workforce is expected to be impacted one way or another by machine-learning technologies. AI technology will be at the forefront of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and it will prove to be a far greater challenge than the ones that preceded it. If the world does not prepare, robots and technology could cause mass unemployment.


Ethics in Robotics and Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

As robots are becoming increasingly intelligent and autonomous, from self-driving cars to assistive robots for vulnerable populations, important ethical questions inevitably emerge wherever and whenever such robots interact with humans and thereby impact human well-being. Questions that must be answered include whether such robots should be deployed in human societies in fairly unconstrained environments and what kinds of provisions are needed in robotic control systems to ensure that autonomous machines will not cause humans harms or at least minimize harm when it cannot be avoided. The goal of this specialty is to provide the first interdisciplinary forum for philosophers, psychologists, legal experts, AI researchers and roboticists to disseminate their work specifically targeting the ethical aspects of autonomous intelligent robots. Note that the conjunction of "AI and robotics" here indicates the journal's intended focus is on the ethics of intelligent autonomous robots, not the ethics of AI in general or the ethics of non-intelligent, non-autonomous machines. Examples of questions that we seek to address in this journal are: -- computational architectures for moral machines -- algorithms for moral reasoning, planning, and decision-making -- formal representations of moral principles in robots -- computational frameworks for robot ethics -- human perceptions and the social impact of moral machines -- legal aspects of developing and disseminating moral machines -- algorithms for learning and applying moral principles -- implications of robotic embodiment/physical presence in social space -- variance of ethical challenges across different contexts of human -robot interaction


Is Artificial Intelligence Made in Humanity's Image? Lessons for an AI Military Education - War on the Rocks

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is not like us. For all of AI's diverse applications, human intelligence is not at risk of losing its most distinctive characteristics to its artificial creations. Yet, when AI applications are brought to bear on matters of national security, they are often subjected to an anthropomorphizing tendency that inappropriately associates human intellectual abilities with AI-enabled machines. A rigorous AI military education should recognize that this anthropomorphizing is irrational and problematic, reflecting a poor understanding of both human and artificial intelligence. The most effective way to mitigate this anthropomorphic bias is through engagement with the study of human cognition -- cognitive science.


How visual-based AI is evolving across industries

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Artificial Intelligence is transforming the business world as a whole with all its applications and potential, with visual-based AI being capable of digital images and videos. Visual-based AI, which refers to computer vision, is an application of AI that is playing a significant role in enabling a digital transformation by enabling machines to detect and recognize not just images and videos, but also the various elements within them, such as people, objects, animals and even sentiments, emotional and other parameters-based capabilities to name a few. Artificial intelligence is now further evolving across various industries and sectors. Transport: Computer vision aids in a better experience for transport, as video analytics combined with Automatic number plate recognition can help in tracking and tracing violators of traffic safety laws (speed limits and lane violation etc.) and stolen or lost cars, as well as in toll management and traffic monitoring and controlling. Aviation: Visual AI can help in providing prompt assistance for elderly passengers and for those requiring assistance (physically challenged, pregnant women etc.); it can also be useful in creating a new "face-as-a-ticket" option for easy and fast boarding for passengers, in tracking down lost baggage around the airport as well as in security surveillance on passengers and suspicious objects (track and trace objects and passengers relevant to it).


Pentagon names new chief of responsible artificial intelligence

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The Pentagon has tapped artificial intelligence ethics and research expert Diane Staheli to lead the Responsible AI (RAI) Division of its new Chief Digital and AI Office (CDAO), FedScoop confirmed on Tuesday. In this role, Staheli will help steer the Defense Department's development and application of policies, practices, standards and metrics for buying and building AI that is trustworthy and accountable. She enters the position nearly nine months after DOD's first AI ethics lead exited the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center (JAIC), and in the midst of a broad restructuring of the Pentagon's main AI-associated components under the CDAO. "[Staheli] has significant experience in military-oriented research and development environments, and is a contributing member of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence AI Assurance working group," Sarah Flaherty, CDAO's public affairs officer, told FedScoop. Advanced computer-driven systems use AI to perform tasks that generally require some human intelligence.


Synchromy

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The troubled hero of our story believes that his digital social profile, created by him, is acting independently in an attempt to take over his life. Ultimately, the audience is left asking if he really is losing his mind, or if he can see a reality we all have missed. Librettist Sarah LaBrie says of the script, "When Vera Ivanova approached me with this project, my first thought was that this story would offer an incredible opportunity to play with the concept of identity and the way it changes as our lives migrate increasingly online. Now, however, I've come to understand that the significance of The Double to our current cultural moment runs much deeper than that. In 2022, many of us are coming to terms with what it means to be a citizen of a country founded on a dream that clashes glaringly with the reality many of us confront."


The IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) kicks off with the largest in-person participation and number of represented countries ever

Robohub

The IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), taking place simultaneously at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia and virtually, has just kicked off. ICRA 2022 brings together the world's top researchers and most important companies to share ideas and advances in the fields of robotics and automation. This is the first time the ICRA community is reunited after the pandemic, resulting in record breaking attendance with over 7,000 registrations and 95 countries represented. As the ICRA 2022 Co-Chair Vijay Kumar (University of Pennsylvania, USA) states, "we could not be happier to host the largest robotics conference in the world in Philadelphia, and the beginning of the re-emergence from the pandemic after a three year hiatus. Many important developments in robotics and automation have historically been first presented at ICRA, and in its 39th year, ICRA 2022 promises to take this trend one step further.


Prepare for arrival: Tech pioneer warns of alien invasion

#artificialintelligence

An alien species is headed for planet Earth and we have no reason to believe it will be friendly. Some experts predict it will get here within 30 years, while others insist it will arrive far sooner. Nobody knows what it will look like, but it will share two key traits with us humans – it will be intelligent and self-aware. No, this alien will not come from a distant planet – it will be born right here on Earth, hatched in a research lab at a major university or large corporation. I am referring to the first artificial general intelligence (AGI) that reaches (or exceeds) human-level cognition.


Tech Leaders Can Do More to Avoid Unintended Consequences

WIRED

Ten years ago, in a small hotel room in Helsinki, Finland, a young tech entrepreneur sat down with a pen and paper and calculated that one of his inventions was responsible for wasting the equivalent of more than a million human lifetimes every day. The realization made him feel sick. That entrepreneur's name is Aza Raskin, and he's the inventor of the "infinite scroll," the feature on our phone that keeps us endlessly scrolling through content with the simple swipe of a finger. Back in 2006, Raskin was trying to solve the clunky experience of the next-page button that internet users continually had to click. Ironically, his goal was to stop disruptions to a user's train of thought.