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Pets: Cats are 'too socially inept' to stand with their owners, study warns

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Unlike their canine counterparts, cats may be'too socially inept' to stand with their owners against someone treating their human poorly, a study has warned. Researchers from Japan found that our feline friends will as gladly take food from someone who hinders their owner as one who helps them or acts neutrally. However, this might not be a simple case of treachery, the team said -- instead, it is possible that cats cannot read human social interactions the same way dogs can. Domestic cats evolved from solitary hunters, meaning that they likely lacked the kind of original social skills dogs were able to build on during domestication. Unlike their canine counterparts, cats may be'too socially inept' to stand with their owners against someone treating their human poorly, a study has warned (stock image) In the study, animal behaviour scientist Hitomi Chijiiwa of Kyoto University and colleagues had cat owners try -- unsuccessfully -- to open a transparent container to take out an object while their cats watched.


Chimps think just like humans, scientists discover

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A ground-breaking study has revealed that members of the great apes, such as bonobos, chimps and orangutans, have a theory of mind. This, researchers say, proves they can understand others' mental states -- an ability previously though exclusively reserved to humans. The idea other animals possess this trait has been debated for decades and researchers at Kyoto University think they have proved its existence. A ground-breaking study has revealed that members of the great apes, such as bonobos, chimps and orangutans, have a theory of mind. This, researchers say, proves they can understand others' mental states Theory of mind is a higher cognitive function which allows individuals to understand others' mental states.


AI Is Now Writing Poetry, And It's Hilariously Terrible

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence has a pretty poor track record of trying to fool humans. From attempting to write Game of Thrones books to creating Dungeons and Dragons monsters, it just doesn't quite have the creative knack of humans. But then, it looks like experts aren't that good at telling the difference between human and machine either, at least when it comes to poetry. A study published on arXiv from Kyoto University found that, despite writing some truly terribly verses, experts couldn't tell if it was written by AI, as Futurism pointed out. How bad was the poetry?


Brain manipulation may boost confidence: Study

#artificialintelligence

Researchers in Japan are using a state-of-the-art technique to read and then amplify self-confidence in study participants. Dr. Mitsuo Kawato, director of the Computational Neuroscience Laboratories at the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International in Kyoto, Japan, has pioneered the process called "Decoded Neurofeedback." The technique used brain scanning to monitor and detect the occurrence of specific complex patterns of activity tied to high self-confidence states, while 17 participants performed a simple perceptual task. Whenever a pattern of high confidence was detected, participants received a small monetary reward. By doing this, researchers were able to directly boost a person's own confidence unconsciously, meaning the participants were unaware of the manipulation taking place.


'Mind-readers'? All great apes may be able to see others' points of view

Christian Science Monitor | Science

How you see the world may be very different than how someone else sees it. And recognizing that has long been thought to be a uniquely human ability. But when it comes to understanding others' perspectives, humans might not be alone. "Reading others' minds is not our special skill," says Fumihiro Kano, a comparative psychologist at Kyoto University in Japan. Nonhuman apes can do it, too, according to Dr. Kano's research, published Thursday in the journal Science, a finding that could further blur the line between the cognitive capacities of humans and nonhuman apes.


Can nonhuman apes understand others' points of view?

Christian Science Monitor | Science

How you see the world may be very different than how someone else sees it. And recognizing that has long been thought to be a uniquely human ability. But when it comes to understanding others' perspectives, humans might not be alone. "Reading others' mind is not our special skill," says Fumihiro Kano, a comparative psychologist at Kyoto University in Japan. Nonhuman apes can do it, too, according to Dr. Kano's research, published Thursday in the journal Science, a finding that could further blur the line between the cognitive capacities of humans and nonhuman apes.