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Teaching AI to perceive the world through your eyes

#artificialintelligence

AI that understands the world from a first-person point of view could unlock a new era of immersive experiences, as devices like augmented reality (AR) glasses and virtual reality (VR) headsets become as useful in everyday life as smartphones. Imagine your AR device displaying exactly how to hold the sticks during a drum lesson, guiding you through a recipe, helping you find your lost keys, or recalling memories as holograms that come to life in front of you. To build these new technologies, we need to teach AI to understand and interact with the world like we do, from a first-person perspective -- commonly referred to in the research community as egocentric perception. Today's computer vision (CV) systems, however, typically learn from millions of photos and videos that are captured in third-person perspective, where the camera is just a spectator to the action. "Next-generation AI systems will need to learn from an entirely different kind of data -- videos that show the world from the center of the action, rather than the sidelines," says Kristen Grauman, lead research scientist at Facebook.


U.S. offers payments and relocation to family of Afghans killed in botched drone attack

The Japan Times

The Pentagon has offered unspecified condolence payments to the family of 10 civilians who were killed in a botched U.S. drone attack in Afghanistan in August during the final days before American troops withdrew from the country. The U.S. Defense Department said it made a commitment that included offering "ex-gratia condolence payments," in addition to working with the U.S. State Department in support of the family members who were interested in relocation to the United States. Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, held a virtual meeting on Thursday with Steven Kwon, the founder and president of Nutrition & Education International, the aid organization that employed Zemari Ahmadi, who was killed in the Aug. 29 drone attack, Pentagon Press Secretary John Kirby said late on Friday. Ahmadi and others who were killed in the strike were innocent victims who bore no blame and were not affiliated with Islamic State Khorasan or threats to U.S. forces, Kirby said. The drone strike in Kabul killed as many as 10 civilians, including seven children.


Senior Product Manager, Data Science & Analytics

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Afghanistan: US offers to pay relatives of Kabul drone attack victims

BBC News

The compensation offer was made on Thursday in a meeting between Colin Kahl, the under-secretary of defence for policy, and Steven Kwon, the founder and president of an aid group active in Afghanistan called Nutrition and Education International, the Pentagon said in a statement.


US offers to pay families of Afghans killed in drone attack

Al Jazeera

The Pentagon has offered unspecified condolence payments to the family of 10 civilians who were killed in a botched US drone attack in Afghanistan in August during the final days before American troops withdrew from the country. The US Department of Defense said it made a commitment that included offering "ex-gratia condolence payments", in addition to working with the US Department of State in support of the family members who were interested in relocation to the United States. Colin Kahl, the US under-secretary of defense for policy, held a virtual meeting on Thursday with Steven Kwon, the founder and president of Nutrition & Education International, the aid organisation that employed Zemari Ahmadi, who was killed in the August 29 drone attack, Pentagon press secretary John Kirby said late on Friday. Ahmadi and others who were killed in the drone raid were innocent victims who bore no blame and were not affiliated with Islamic State in Khorasan Province, ISKP (ISIS-K) or threats to US forces, Kirby said. The drone raid in Kabul killed as many as 10 civilians, including seven children.


COVID-19 is forcing video game companies to rethink remote work

The Japan Times

Jordan Lemos, a writer for video games, has lived in three different cities over the past five years. He moved from Los Angeles to Quebec to Seattle -- working on blockbusters such as Assassin's Creed Odyssey and Ghost of Tsushima -- because the jobs required it. So when he was looking for a new gig last year, he told prospective employers he wasn't going to do it again. He would only work remotely. Several big game companies were quick to say no once they heard his ultimatum.


China crackdown on Apple store hits holy book apps, Audible

Boston Herald

Amazon's audiobook service Audible and phone apps for reading the holy books of Islam and Christianity have disappeared from the Apple store in mainland China, the latest examples of the impact of the country's tightened rules for internet firms. Audible said Friday that it removed its app from the Apple store in mainland China last month "due to permit requirements." The makers of apps for reading and listening to the Quran and Bible say their apps have also been removed from Apple's China-based store at the government's request. A spokesperson for China's embassy in the U.S. declined to speak about specific app removals but said the Chinese government has "always encouraged and supported the development of the Internet." "At the same time, the development of the internet in China must also comply with Chinese laws and regulations," an emailed statement from Liu Pengyu said.


Humana leverages Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare to develop advanced predictive models

#artificialintelligence

This blog post has been co-authored by Slawek Kierner, SVP of Enterprise Data & Analytics, Humana and Tie-Yan Liu, Assistant Managing Director, Microsoft Research China. Trips to the hospital happen. And while everyone in the industry strives to deliver world-class care for in-patient experiences, everyone--patients and care teams alike, would prefer to avoid those stays at the hospital. The teams at Humana believed they had enough data to explore the possibility of proactively identifying when patients were heading toward a high-risk event, and they put Microsoft Cloud for Healthcare and AI technology to the test. Humana's questions were straightforward: How do we take the data we have today and use it proactively?


La veille de la cybersécurité

#artificialintelligence

A top Pentagon software official recently quit his job, claiming that the US is dragging its heels. The Pentagon's first-ever chief software officer abruptly quit earlier this month, and now we know exactly why: Nicolas Chaillan, former CSO of the United States Air Force and Space Force, told the Financial Times that the United States has "no competing fighting chance against China in 15 to 20 years" when it comes to cyberwarfare and artificial intelligence. Chaillan, a 37-year-old tech entrepreneur, added that cyber defenses at many government agencies are at "kindergarten level," and that companies like Google were doing the US a disservice by not working with the military more on AI, since Chinese companies were making a "massive investment" in AI without getting all hung up on the ethics of it all. And while quitting your job because America has already lost the AI race is a bit dramatic, Chaillan isn't the only one who's concerned about China's dominance in this arena.


Could Artificial Intelligence Prevent Future Wars?

#artificialintelligence

A U.S. Army soldier monitors a 14' Shadow surveillance drone from a control room after it's launched. There is now interest in taking AI beyond the courtroom and into the realms of conflict resolution. There is growing concern that current mediation and peacemaking approaches are proving less and less effective in resolving localized and international conflicts. In response, interest is rising in the potential for artificial intelligence to play a role in advising on or resolving complex conflicts. A combination of situational complexity, intractable positions of opposing sides and escalating costs is driving the search for AI-based approaches that could replace humans in resolving legal cases, international disputes and military conflicts.