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Deploy Deep Learning Models Using Streamlit and Heroku

#artificialintelligence

Deep Learning and Machine Learning models trained by many data professionals either end up in an inference.ipynb Those meticulous model architectures capable of creating awe in the real world never see the light of the day. Those models just sit there in the background processing requests via an API gateway doing their job silently and making the system more intelligent. People using those intelligent systems don't always credit the Data Professionals who spent hours or weeks or months collecting data, cleaning the collected data, formatting the data to use it correctly, writing the model architecture, training that model architecture and validating it. And if the validation metrics are not very good, again going back to square one and repeating the cycle.


An intro to the fast-paced world of artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The field of artificial intelligence is moving at a staggering clip, with breakthroughs emerging in labs across MIT. Through the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP), undergraduates get to join in. In two years, the MIT Quest for Intelligence has placed 329 students in research projects aimed at pushing the frontiers of computing and artificial intelligence, and using these tools to revolutionize how we study the brain, diagnose and treat disease, and search for new materials with mind-boggling properties. Rafael Gomez-Bombarelli, an assistant professor in the MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering, has enlisted several Quest-funded undergraduates in his mission to discover new molecules and materials with the help of AI. "They bring a blue-sky open mind and a lot of energy," he says. "Through the Quest, we had the chance to connect with students from other majors who probably wouldn't have thought to reach out."


Maryland Gov. Hogan pushes to reopen schools for hybrid learning

FOX News

A panel of parents give there take on the president's move to reopen schools on'Fox & amp; Friends.' Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is going all in on a push to reopen schools in the state for hybrid learning by the beginning of March. Hogan said during a news conference at St. John's College in Annapolis on Thursday that there is a growing consensus in the state and in the country that there is "no public health reason for county school boards to keep students out of schools" due to COVID-19. He argued that continuing down a path of virtual learning could lead to significant setbacks for students, especially among students of color and those from low-income families. "I understand that in earlier stages of the pandemic, that this was a very difficult decision for county school boards to make," Hogan added.


How a robot investigator searched 60 million files

BBC News

"As you identify more and more examples of covert payment the AI learns on the fly. That's the beauty and the magic of AI," says Mr Mason. A scoring system was set up, with points added for certain attributes. Any score above a certain number was deemed worthy of further investigation. The machine-learning technology became better and better as it progressed.


Top 6 Deep Learning Models You Should Master for Killer AI Applications

#artificialintelligence

The field of deep learning has gained popularity with the rise of available processing power, storage space, and big data. Instead of using traditional machine learning models, AI engineers have been gradually switching to deep learning models. Where there is abundant data, deep learning models almost always outperform traditional machine learning models. Therefore, as we collect more data at every passing year, it makes sense to use deep learning models. Furthermore, the field of deep learning is also growing fast.


Machine Learning with ML.Net for Absolute Beginners

#artificialintelligence

Hey, My name is Nilay Mehta! I am an experienced .Net developer, having the Microsoft certificate of Programming with C#.Net. I have a Master of Computer Applications and Bachelor of Computer Application degrees. I've worked with a range of development tools from PHP, C#, ASP.NET, and ASP.Net core. I am a passionate software engineer who loves learning new technologies, and from the past 3 years, I'm enjoying sharing that knowledge through blogs and courses.


This $39 Python training will prepare you for a future in AI

ZDNet

Artificial intelligence is slowly making its way into every industry, such as transportation and healthcare. Those with the ability to sift through volumes of data to identify insights are best equipped to succeed in an AI-driven job market. If you're interested in a career in AI, then you need to add Python to your skillset. Python is an extremely popular programming language, and it happens to be one of the easiest to learn, especially with The Ultimate Python & Artificial Intelligence Certification Bundle. These expert-taught online courses are normally $199 apiece, but ZDNet readers can grab the set for 97% off, dropping the price to $39.99.


Forgetting in Deep Learning

#artificialintelligence

Neural network models suffer from the phenomenon of catastrophic forgetting: a model can drastically lose its generalization ability on a task after being trained on a new task. This usually means a new task will likely override the weights that have been learned in the past (see Figure 1), and thus degrade the model performance for the past tasks. Without fixing this problem, a single neural network will not be able to adapt itself to a continuous learning scenario, because it forgets the existing information/knowledge when it learns new things. For realistic applications of deep learning, where continual learning can be crucial, catastrophic forgetting would need to be avoided. However, there is only limited study about catastrophic forgetting and its underlying causes.


Accurate machine learning in materials science facilitated by using diverse data sources

Nature

Scientists are always hunting for materials that have superior properties. They therefore continually synthesize, characterize and measure the properties of new materials using a range of experimental techniques. Computational modelling is also used to estimate the properties of materials. However, there is usually a trade-off between the cost of the experiments (or simulations) and the accuracy of the measurements (or estimates), which has limited the number of materials that can be tested rigorously. Writing in Nature Computational Science, Chen et al.1 report a machine-learning approach that combines data from multiple sources of measurements and simulations, all of which have different levels of approximation, to learn and predict materials' properties. Their method allows the construction of a more general and accurate model of such properties than was previously possible, thereby facilitating the screening of promising material candidates.


The Higher Education Industry Is Embracing Predatory and Discriminatory Student Data Practices

Slate

In December, the University of Texas at Austin's computer science department announced that it would stop using a machine-learning system to evaluate applicants for its Ph.D. program due to concerns that encoded bias may exacerbate existing inequities in the program and in the field in general. This move toward more inclusive admissions practices is a rare (and welcome) exception to a worrying trend in education: Colleges, standardized test providers, consulting companies, and other educational service providers are increasingly adopting predatory, discriminatory, and outright exclusionary student data practices. Student data has long been used as a college recruiting and admissions tool. In 1972, College Board, the company that owns the PSAT, the SAT, and the AP Exams, created its Student Search Service and began licensing student names and data profiles to colleges (hence the college catalogs that fill the mail boxes of high school students who have taken the exams). Today, College Board licenses millions of student data profiles every year for 47 cents per examinee.