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Major League Baseball wants to deploy strike zone robo-umpires in 2024

Engadget

Major League Baseball will "likely" introduce an Automated Strike Zone System starting in 2024, commissioner Rob Manfred told ESPN. The so-called robot umpires may call all balls and strikes then relay the information to a plate umpire, or be part of a replay review system that allows managers to challenge calls. "We have an automated strike zone system that works," Manfred said. The comments come in the wake of fan outrage over umpire's missed calls in recent games, including a brutal low strike error during a Detroit Tigers and Minnesota Twins tilt. Give me robo umps already," tweeted Grand Rapids ABC sports director Jamal Spencer. MLB has been experimenting with robo umps in minor league Atlantic Triple-A league since 2019.


Satellite with GoPro attached takes epic selfie above Australia's Great Barrier Reef

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Blue Planet sure looks spectacular. NanoAvionics used a GoPro attached to a selfie stick to take a 4K-resolution selfie about 342 miles above Australia's Coral Sea and Great Barrier Reef. The stunning views show a glimpse of Papua New Guinea and Australia, lots of swirling clouds and the vast blue expanse of our ocean. 'The reason for taking the photo and video clip with the Great Barrier Reef in the background was partly symbolic. We wanted to highlight the vulnerability of our planet and the importance of Earth observation by satellites, especially for monitoring environment and climate changes, said Vytenis J. Buzas, co-founder and CEO of NanoAvionics, in a press release.


MLB debuts 'robot umpires' for some Triple-A games as emergence in the majors looms

FOX News

LAS VEGAS – Most baseball fans won't forget the controversial call in Game 6 of the 2019 World Series between the Houston Astros and the Washington Nationals when runner Trea Turner was ruled out because of interference. Umpire accuracy is a frustration for fans and players in nearly every game. This season, MLB has launched so-called "robot umpires" in 11 Pacific Coast League Triple-A teams, putting it one step away from reaching the major leagues, to improve accuracy and reduce delays. The automated balls and strikes system (ABS) debuted in a Las Vegas Aviators' game earlier this month. As cool and bizarre as it would be to see "Jetsons"-style robots on the field, most fans won't notice the actual device -- eight surveillance-looking cameras at the top of the bleachers.


How a Silicon Valley algorithm could change the world of sport FOREVER

#artificialintelligence

Popularised in the Brad Pitt film Moneyball, groundbreaking analytics almost saw the Oakland A's crowned the kings of baseball back in 2002. General manager Billy Beane's evidence-based, sabermetric approach allowed the small-market franchise to compete against teams with much bigger budgets by finding undervalued players through revolutionary statistical analysis. The concept sparked the adoption of more data-driven principles across a myriad of sports – with teams and coaches all trying to gain a competitive advantage – but the latest innovation may be the biggest game-changer of the lot. Invented by artificial intelligence company Zone7, the new Silicon Valley algorithm is being used by teams in the NBA, NFL and Premier League as a way to detect injury risk and recommend pre-emptive action. One of those clubs, Liverpool FC, has deployed it to great success this season in their hunt for an unprecedented quadruple, cutting the number of days players have lost to injury to 1,008 from more than 1,500 in 2020/21.


Artificial General Intelligence Is Not as Imminent as You Might Think

#artificialintelligence

To the average person, it must seem as if the field of artificial intelligence is making immense progress. According to the press releases, and some of the more gushing media accounts, OpenAI's DALL-E 2 can seemingly create spectacular images from any text; another OpenAI system called GPT-3 can talk about just about anything; and a system called Gato that was released in May by DeepMind, a division of Alphabet, seemingly worked well on every task the company could throw at it. One of DeepMind's high-level executives even went so far as to brag that in the quest for artificial general intelligence (AGI), AI that has the flexibility and resourcefulness of human intelligence, "The Game is Over!" And Elon Musk said recently that he would be surprised if we didn't have artificial general intelligence by 2029. Machines may someday be as smart as people, and perhaps even smarter, but the game is far from over.


Rays' Nick Anderson explains 'differing beliefs' after several teammates forgo 'Pride Night' logo

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Five members of the Tampa Bay Rays chose not to wear rainbow-colored patches on their uniforms during the team's Pride Night over the weekend, causing many to publicly criticize their choice. The five players cited religious beliefs as to why they chose to remove the logos, and Tampa Rays manager Kevin Cash said that the organization supported each player's right to wear or not wear the logos. Nick Anderson #70 of the Tampa Bay Rays throws against the Tampa Bay Rays in the ninth inning of a baseball game at Tropicana Field on September 26, 2021, in St. Petersburg, Florida.


Machine learning model could better measure baseball players' performance

#artificialintelligence

New research at the Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology could make a similar impact on the sport. The team has developed a machine learning model that could better measure baseball players' and teams' short- and long-term performance, compared to existing statistical analysis methods for the sport. Drawing on recent advances in natural language processing and computer vision, their approach would completely change, and could enhance, the way the state of a game and a player's impact on the game is measured. According to Connor Heaton, doctoral candidate in the College of IST, the existing family of methods, known as sabermetrics, rely upon the number of times a player or team achieves a discrete event -- such as hitting a double or home run. However, it doesn't consider the surrounding context of each action.


How artificial intelligence 'blew up' tennis

BBC News

Data analytics has been around a long time in sport. Perhaps the best known in example of its use is from 2002, when the Oakland Athletics baseball team used statistical analysis to choose their squad, rather than the wisdom of coaches and scouts, and their favoured metrics.


AI: How a Silicon Valley algorithm could change the world of sports forever

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Popularised in the Brad Pitt film Moneyball, groundbreaking analytics almost saw the Oakland A's crowned the kings of baseball back in 2002. General manager Billy Beane's evidence-based, sabermetric approach allowed the small-market franchise to compete against teams with much bigger budgets by finding undervalued players through revolutionary statistical analysis. The concept sparked the adoption of more data-driven principles across a myriad of sports – with teams and coaches all trying to gain a competitive advantage – but the latest innovation may be the biggest game-changer of the lot. Invented by artificial intelligence company Zone7, the new Silicon Valley algorithm is being used by teams in the NBA, NFL and Premier League as a way to detect injury risk and recommend pre-emptive action. One of those clubs, Liverpool FC, has deployed it to great success this season in their hunt for an unprecedented quadruple, cutting the number of days players have lost to injury to 1,008 from more than 1,500 in 2020/21.


Baseball Pitch Prediction

#artificialintelligence

The data I used can be found on Kaggle. The overall dataset contains eight comma-separated value(CSV) files, containing data from the MLB seasons 2015–2018. However, I focused on two of the files, pitches and at-bats. The pitches CSV file contained 40 data columns, and the at-bats had 11. Both of them had data values that I would need, so I decided to merge the files.