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Security & Privacy


Scientists create new method to kill cyberattacks in less than a second

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"The attacker is poking at the memory controller, the library door, to say, 'is it busy now?' "We were motivated to undertake this work as there was nothing available that could do this kind of automated detecting and killing on a user's machine in real-time." Existing products, known as endpoint detection and response (EDR), are used to protect end-user devices such as desktops, laptops, and mobile devices and are designed to quickly detect, analyse, block, and contain attacks that are in progress. The main problem with these products is that the collected data needs to be sent to administrators in order for a response to be implemented, by which time a piece of malware may already have caused damage. To test the new detection method, the team set up a virtual computing environment to represent a group of commonly used laptops, each running up to 35 applications at the same time to simulate normal behaviour. The AI-based detection method was then tested using thousands of samples of malware.


Automotive Cybersecurity Market - Insights, Forecast to 2026

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The global Automotive Cybersecurity Market size is projected to grow from USD 2.0 billion in 2021 to USD 5.3 billion by 2026, at a CAGR of 21.3%. Increasing incidents of cyber-attacks on vehicles and massive vehicles recalls by OEMs have increased awareness about automotive cybersecurity among OEMs globally. Moreover, increasing government mandates on incorporating several safety features, such as rear-view camera, automatic emergency braking, lane departure warning system, and electronic stability control, have further opened new opportunities for automotive cybersecurity service providers globally. As a result, there are various start-ups present in the automotive cybersecurity ecosystem. Government initiatives toward building an intelligent transport system have also further escalated the demand for cybersecurity solutions all over the world.


Pros And Cons of AI In Manufacturing DataScienceCentral.com

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The fourth industrial revolution has been a game-changer, with the global economy's expansion driving the adoption of new technologies across sectors. Manufacturers are using AI software in product design, production, supply chain, and logistics. AI analytics and data are helping in improving product quality and efficiency. Advances in machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI), and Big Data have initiated an algorithm-based era. Today companies are able to automate multiple tasks, cutting down on errors as well as downtime and expenditures associated with them using AI.


Artificial intelligence investment grows, but barriers remain

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While the potential of machine learning and AI has helped address several problems across many industries, it has also created an acute imbalance in the supply and demand of AI talent, says Oliver Tavakoli, CTO at Vectra. Cybersecurity companies have to deal with this shortage as they compete with major organizations for talent and "have resorted to AI-as-a-sidecar (solving a small number of peripheral problems through the application of AI) rather than AI-as-the-engine (building the core of their offerings around AI and solving peripheral problems with conventional techniques). Predictable, the former approach has resulted in a large gap in what they deliver vs. the value customers think the AI should be delivering," Tavakoli explains.


UK fines Clearview AI £7.5M for scraping citizens' data

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Clearview AI has been fined £7.5 million by the UK's privacy watchdog for scraping the online data of citizens without their explicit consent. The controversial facial recognition provider has scraped billions of images of people across the web for its system. Understandably, it caught the attention of regulators and rights groups from around the world. In November 2021, the UK's Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) imposed a potential fine of just over £17 million on Clearview AI. Today's announcement suggests Clearview AI got off relatively lightly.


UK privacy watchdog fines Clearview AI £7.5m and orders UK data to be deleted

ZDNet

Since completing a degree in journalism, Aimee has had her fair share of covering various topics, including business, retail, manufacturing, and travel. She continues to expand her repertoire as a tech journalist with ZDNet. The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has fined controversial facial recognition company Clearview AI £7.5 million ($9.4 million) for breaching UK data protection laws and has issued an enforcement notice ordering the company to stop obtaining and using data of UK residents, and to delete the data from its systems. In its finding, the ICO detailed how Clearview AI failed to inform people in the UK that it was collecting their images from the web and social media to create a global online database that could be used for facial recognition; failed to have a lawful reason for collecting people's information; failed to have a process in place to stop the data being retained indefinitely; and failed to meet data protection standards required for biometric data under the General Data Protection Regulation. The ICO also found the company asked for additional personal information, including photos, when asked by members of the public if they were on their database.


UK fines Clearview just under $10M for privacy breaches – TechCrunch

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The UK's data protection watchdog has confirmed a penalty for the controversial facial recognition company, Clearview AI -- announcing a fine of just over £7.5 million today for a string of breaches of local privacy laws. The watchdog has also issued an enforcement notice, ordering Clearview to stop obtaining and using the personal data of UK residents that is publicly available on the internet; and telling it to delete the information of UK residents from its systems. The US company has amassed a database of 20 billion facial images by scraping data off the public internet, such as from social media services, to create an online database that it uses to power an AI-based identity-matching service which it sells to entities such as law enforcement. The problem is Clearview has never asked individuals whether it can use their selfies for that. And in many countries it has been found in breach of privacy laws.


Examining Marketing Impact of EU AI Act

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On April 21, the EU officially proposed the Artificial Intelligence Act, outlining the ability to monitor, regulate and ban uses of machine learning technology. The goal, according to officials, is to invest in and accelerate the use of AI in the EU, bolstering the economy while also ensuring consistency, addressing global challenges and establishing trust with human users. AI use cases with unacceptable risk will be banned outright. High-risk applications, similarly, pose a high risk to health, safety and fundamental rights, though the debate around the definition of "high risk" has been raging since last year, with more than 300 organizations weighing in. These AI applications are allowed on the market only if certain safeguards are in place, such as human oversight, transparency and traceability.


Analyzing 25 Years of Privacy Policies with Machine Learning

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A recent study has used machine learning analysis techniques to chart the readability, usefulness, length and complexity of more than 50,000 privacy policies on popular websites in a period covering 25 years from 1996 to 2021. The research concludes that the average reader would need to devote 400 hours of'annual reading time' (more than an hour a day) in order to penetrate the growing word counts, obfuscating language and vague language use that characterize the modern privacy policies of some of the most-frequented websites. 'The average policy length has almost doubled in the last ten years, with 2159 words in March 2011 and 4191 words in March 2021, and almost quadrupled since 2000 (1146 words).' The mean word count and sentence count among the corpus studied, over a 25 year period. Though the rate of increase in length spiked when the GDPR and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) protections came into force, the paper discounts these variations as'small effect sizes' which appear to be insignificant against the broader long-term trend.


How AI Can Supercharge Your Ransomware Defense In 2022?

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Human-operated ransomware attacks have threat actors using certain methods to get into your devices. They depend on hands-on-keyboard activities to get into your network. AI can protect you in the event of these and other attacks. Since the decisions are data-driven, you have a lower likelihood of falling victim to attacks. The decisions are based on extensive experimentation and research to improve effectiveness without altering customer experience.