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Exclusive Talk with Toby Lewis, Global Head of Threat Analysis at Darktrace

#artificialintelligence

Toby: My role here at Darktrace is the Global Head of Threat Analysis. My day-to-day job involves looking at the 100 or so cybersecurity analysts we have spread from New Zealand to Singapore, the UK, and most major time zones in the US. My main role is to evaluate how we can use the Darktrace platform to work with our customers. How can we ensure that our customers get the most out of our cybersecurity expertise and support when using AI to secure their network? The other half of my role at Darktrace is subject matter expertise. This role involves talking to reporters like yourself or our customers who want to hear more about what Darktrace can do to help them from a cybersecurity perspective, discussing the context of current events. That part of my role was born out of a nearly 20-year career in cybersecurity. I first started in government and was one of the founding members of the National Cybersecurity Center here in the UK.


How AI is shaping the cybersecurity arms race

#artificialintelligence

The average business receives 10,000 alerts every day from the various software tools it uses to monitor for intruders, malware and other threats. Cybersecurity staff often find themselves inundated with data they need to sort through to manage their cyber defenses. Cyberattacks are increasing and affect thousands of organizations and millions of people in the U.S. alone. These challenges underscore the need for better ways to stem the tide of cyber-breaches. Artificial intelligence is particularly well suited to finding patterns in huge amounts of data.


La veille de la cybersécurité

#artificialintelligence

The average business receives 10,000 alerts every day from the various software tools it uses to monitor for intruders, malware, and other threats. Cybersecurity staff often find themselves inundated with data they need to sort through to manage their cyber defenses. Cyberattacks are increasing and affect thousands of organizations and millions of people in the U.S. alone. These challenges underscore the need for better ways to stem the tide of cyber-breaches. Artificial intelligence is particularly well suited to finding patterns in huge amounts of data.


How artificial intelligence is influencing the arms race in cybersecurity

#artificialintelligence

The average business receives 10,000 alerts every day from the various software tools it uses to monitor for intruders, malware, and other threats. Cybersecurity staff often find themselves inundated with data they need to sort through to manage their cyber defenses. Cyberattacks are increasing and affect thousands of organizations and millions of people in the U.S. alone. These challenges underscore the need for better ways to stem the tide of cyber-breaches. Artificial intelligence is particularly well suited to finding patterns in huge amounts of data.


Deep Fakes Will Change Cybersecurity Forever - RTInsights

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Thanks to greater access to technology like AI and blockchain, organizations may be able to fight deep fake threats and reduce this risk in the coming years. Deep fakes are causing a buzz in cybersecurity circles. While relatively new on the scene and not always malicious, they have caused high-profile losses for organizations targeted by threat actors. The biggest cybersecurity challenge for 2022 will be deep fakes, thanks to a growing number of distributed workforce arrangements making it more challenging to receive face-to-face confirmation. Here's what companies need to know.


Artificial intelligence and cybersecurity risks: Take steps to address AI vulnerabilities

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The experts say considerations for managing security must be made right from the design and planning phases of any AI project.iStockPhoto Artificial intelligence (AI) technology is a powerful asset in business, allowing machines to think for themselves – and at a faster pace than ever before. But AI systems can pose cybersecurity challenges, which can cause operational, financial, health and safety, and reputational damage. BDO Lixar, which is BDO Canada's national technology consulting business arm, helps organizations recognize and manage such risks. Partners Rocco Galletto, head of cybersecurity, and Daryl Senick, who is responsible for data and AI, as head of financial services, talk about the potential vulnerabilities of AI and what can be done to make these systems safe and secure.


How AI is shaping the cybersecurity arms race

#artificialintelligence

The average business receives 10,000 alerts every day from the various software tools it uses to monitor for intruders, malware and other threats. Cybersecurity staff often find themselves inundated with data they need to sort through to manage their cyber defenses. Cyberattacks are increasing and affect thousands of organizations and millions of people in the U.S. alone. These challenges underscore the need for better ways to stem the tide of cyber-breaches. Artificial intelligence is particularly well suited to finding patterns in huge amounts of data.


How AI Is Shaping the Cybersecurity Arms Race

#artificialintelligence

The average business receives 10,000 alerts every day from the various software tools it uses to monitor for intruders, malware and other threats. Cybersecurity staff often find themselves inundated with data they need to sort through to manage their cyber defenses. Cyberattacks are increasing and affect thousands of organizations and millions of people in the U.S. alone. These challenges underscore the need for better ways to stem the tide of cyber-breaches. Artificial intelligence is particularly well suited to finding patterns in huge amounts of data.


How AI is shaping the cybersecurity arms race

#artificialintelligence

The average business receives 10,000 alerts every day from the various software tools it uses to monitor for intruders, malware and other threats. Cybersecurity staff often find themselves inundated with data they need to sort through to manage their cyber defenses. Cyberattacks are increasing and affect thousands of organizations and millions of people in the U.S. alone. These challenges underscore the need for better ways to stem the tide of cyber-breaches. Artificial intelligence is particularly well suited to finding patterns in huge amounts of data.


The New Intelligence Game

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The relevance of the video is that the browser identified the application being used by the IAI as Google Earth and, according to the OSC 2006 report, the Arabic-language caption reads Islamic Army in Iraq/The Military Engineering Unit – Preparations for Rocket Attack, the video was recorded in 5/1/2006, we provide, in Appendix A, a reproduction of the screenshot picture made available in the OSC report. Now, prior to the release of this video demonstration of the use of Google Earth to plan attacks, in accordance with the OSC 2006 report, in the OSC-monitored online forums, discussions took place on the use of Google Earth as a GEOINT tool for terrorist planning. On August 5, 2005 the user "Al-Illiktrony" posted a message to the Islamic Renewal Organization forum titled A Gift for the Mujahidin, a Program To Enable You to Watch Cities of the World Via Satellite, in this post the author dedicated Google Earth to the mujahidin brothers and to Shaykh Muhammad al-Mas'ari, the post was replied in the forum by "Al-Mushtaq al-Jannah" warning that Google programs retain complete information about their users. This is a relevant issue, however, there are two caveats, given the amount of Google Earth users, it may be difficult for Google to flag a jihadist using the functionality in time to prevent an attack plan, one possible solution would be for Google to flag computers based on searched websites and locations, for instance to flag computers that visit certain critical sites, but this is a problem when landmarks are used, furthermore, and this is the second caveat, one may not use one's own computer to produce the search or even mask the IP address. On October 3, 2005, as described in the OSC 2006 report, in a reply to a posting by Saddam Al-Arab on the Baghdad al-Rashid forum requesting the identification of a roughly sketched map, "Almuhannad" posted a link to a site that provided a free download of Google Earth, suggesting that the satellite imagery from Google's service could help identify the sketch.