Goto

Collaborating Authors

Pittsburgh


Solving Sudoku With AI or Quantum?

#artificialintelligence

Established in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US -- Towards AI Co. is the world's leading AI and technology publication focused on diversity, equity, and inclusion. We aim to publish unbiased AI and technology-related articles and be an impartial source of information. We have thousands of contributing writers from university professors, researchers, graduate students, industry experts, and enthusiasts. We receive millions of visits per year, have several thousands of followers across social media, and thousands of subscribers. All of our articles are from their respective authors and may not reflect the views of Towards AI Co., its editors, or its other writers.


SCS Ph.D. Students Designed, Taught New Course To Make Computer Science More Welcoming, Inclusive

CMU School of Computer Science

The Computer Science Department's new course focusing on issues of justice, equity, diversity and inclusion in computer science and society got its start when a group of graduate students decided to create the training they wished they had received. And after hundreds of hours of work by 15 Ph.D. students --pilot programs, countless conversations with faculty and students, data gathering, and developing and tweaking course material -- CS-JEDI: Justice, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion is now a required part of the curriculum for incoming Ph.D. students in computer science. It's also being looked at as a model by both other departments in the School of Computer Science and universities elsewhere. The course was created and taught by Abhinav Adduri, Valerie Chen, Judeth Choi, Bailey Flanigan, Paul Göelz, Anson Kahng, Pallavi Koppol, Ananya Joshi, Tabitha Lee, Sara McAllister, Samantha Reig, Ziv Scully, Catalina Vajiac, Alex Wang and Josh Williams -- all doctoral candidates in SCS who represent nearly every department in the school. The team received Carnegie Mellon University's 2022 Graduate Student Service Award and will be honored during the Celebration of Education Award Ceremony on Thursday, April 28.


The Only Domain AI Can't Crack

#artificialintelligence

Established in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US -- Towards AI Co. is the world's leading AI and technology publication focused on diversity, equity, and inclusion. We aim to publish unbiased AI and technology-related articles and be an impartial source of information. We have thousands of contributing writers from university professors, researchers, graduate students, industry experts, and enthusiasts. We receive millions of visits per year, have several thousands of followers across social media, and thousands of subscribers. All of our articles are from their respective authors and may not reflect the views of Towards AI Co., its editors, or its other writers.


Waibel Elected a Fellow of the International Speech Communication Association

CMU School of Computer Science

Alex Waibel, a professor in Carnegie Mellon University's Language Technologies Institute, has been elected a fellow of the International Speech Communication Association (ISCA). The ISCA recognized Waibel for his pioneering contributions in multilingual and multimodal spoken language processing and translation. Waibel, also faculty at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, has worked on speech and machine translation for decades, developing systems that now can translate speech in real time. Waibel demonstrated the first speech translation systems in the 1990s and 2000s. By 2020, he had developed a system that outperformed humans in recognizing conversational speech on a public benchmark.


2022 Doherty Award Recipient Howie Choset Kavčić-Moura Professor of Computer Science - The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University

CMU School of Computer Science

Howie Choset is a Professor of Robotics where he serves as the co-director, along with Matt Travers, of the Biorobotics Lab. Choset's research program has made contributions to strategically significant problems in surgery, manufacturing, on-orbit maintenance, recycling and search and rescue. His work is most famous for its snake robots and other biologically inspired systems and recently his group has been contributing to robotic modularity, multi-agent planning, information-based search, and skill learning. Currently, Choset's projects include: medical support in the field, expeditionary robotics, on-orbit maintenance and construction of structures in space, rapidly carrying heavy objects up several flights of stairs, recycling of E-waste, food preparation, "edge"-sensing, and aerospace painting. Choset has led multi-PI projects centered on manufacturing: (1) automating the programming of robots for auto-body painting; (2) the development of mobile manipulators for agile and flexible fixture-free manufacturing of large structures in aerospace, and (3) the creation of a data-robot ecosystem for rapid manufacturing in the commercial electronics industry.


How Gather AI's Automated Inventory Management System Helps Businesses

#artificialintelligence

Pittsburgh, PA--March 29, 2022: Gather AI, the first truly automated inventory management system that brings near-real-time visibility to warehousing operations, has positively impacted many customers. Small-size physical stores all the way to multinational corporations like Walmart and Amazon depend on reliable and accurate inventory management software systems, as these are needed everywhere, and with even more challenging tasks at large-scale retailers, such as the warehouses from the biggest retailers in the Fortune 500. But, even with inventory management software, large organizations still rely on people on forklifts with barcode readers to perform cycle counts, from a significant amount of employees to costly machinery to properly manage large-scale inventories, such as those found in retail, third-party logistics, food distribution, and warehouses in air cargo industries. Most importantly, the visibility of what's sitting on the DC floor is delayed by 3-4 months. To solve this significant problem, Gather AI is building the world's first truly autonomous inventory management platform, freeing logistic-driven organizations from inefficient and manual tasks through intelligent and robust automation.


A Unifying, Game-Theoretic Framework for Imitation Learning

#artificialintelligence

IL algorithms can be grouped broadly into (a) online, (b) offline, and (c) interactive methods. We provide, for each setting, performance bounds for learned policies that apply for all algorithms, provably efficient algorithmic templates for achieving said bounds, and practical realizations that out-perform recent work. From beating the world champion at Go (Silver et al.) to getting cars to drive themselves (Bojarski et al.), we've seen unprecedented successes in learning to make sequential decisions over the last few years. When viewed from an algorithmic viewpoint, many of these accomplishments share a common paradigm: imitation learning (IL). In imitation learning, one is given access to samples of expert behavior (e.g.


Girls of Steel Showcase Projects for U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle

CMU School of Computer Science

It's two weeks until the competition, and 17-year-old Ella Maier is ecstatic her robot can finally do a pull-up. "Oh, that's so exciting," the Girls of Steel member said, as her robot latched on to a bar at the team's practice facility and hoisted itself to the second rung. "I'm in charge of that subsystem, and I'm really pleased it works. There's always a fear that it might not perform. There are no guarantees on this stuff, ever."


SCS Faculty Receive Nearly $2.5M in NSF CAREER Awards

CMU School of Computer Science

Four Carnegie Mellon University researchers in the School of Computer Science recently received Faculty Early Career Development Program awards from the National Science Foundation. The nearly $2.5 million will further research in deep learning, the safety of robots and autonomous systems, software engineering, and machine learning for healthcare. The NSF Faculty Early Career Development Program, commonly known as CAREER awards, is the foundation's most prestigious for young faculty members. Changliu Liu, an assistant professor in the Robotics Institute, was awarded nearly $745,000 for research to improve the safety of autonomous systems operating closely with humans. The work will develop a new algorithmic framework to assure the safety of robotic systems that optimizes performance when safety can be managed, anticipates and compensates for inevitable failures when it cannot, and learns from past mistakes.


Latest Issue of The Link Now Online

CMU School of Computer Science

Researchers sorted through 38 million tweets from more than 7 million users to better understand how climate change disinformation forms and spreads. Meeting a deaf woman while volunteering at a homeless shelter inspired a student to advocate for including sign language in language technology research. And subterranean search-and-rescue efforts could get a boost from the lessons of a fleet of robots and drones exploring the most remote corners of caves, tunnels and the underground world. The latest issue of The Link, the magazine of Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science, is now online and features these stories and more. The magazine highlights the work of faculty and students from across the school.