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The AI Consulting Podcast on Apple Podcasts

#artificialintelligence

Today's guest is Bret Greenstein, SVP and Global Head of AI at Cognizant, one of the top 5 largest tech consulting companies globally, with 2019 revenue at nearly $17B. What does it look like to interact with a client who has an idea of an AI project, inform their idea of what AI is, and help refine and define the problem to solve it. It is often not the case where a client will immediately have a robust understanding of what they need to do, or they will come in with a granularly very tight and coherent idea of where AI can drive value in their business. Bret goes into tactfully bringing education into the sales and delivery process to add more value to clients. Do you want more keys to success in your own AI consulting career?


Connected cars: How 5G and IoT will affect the auto industry

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This ebook, based on the latest ZDNet / TechRepublic special feature, examines how 5G connectivity will underpin the next generation of IoT devices. Autonomous cars (and other vehicles, such as trucks) may still be years away from widespread deployment, but connected cars are very much with us. The modern automobile is fast becoming a sensor-laden mobile Internet of Things device, with considerable on-board computing power and communication systems devoted to three broad areas: vehicle location, driver behaviour, engine diagnostics and vehicle activity (telematics); the surrounding environment (vehicle-to-everything or V2X communication); and the vehicle's occupants (infotainment). All of these systems use cellular -- and increasingly 5G -- technology, among others. Although 5G networks are still a work in progress for mobile operators, the pace of deployment and launches is picking up.


The Morning After: SpaceX's Starship secures a lunar lander deal with NASA

Engadget

While we continue to wait for news about the Mars copter's first test flight, Elon Musk and SpaceX closed out the week with a big win, scoring a contract from NASA to use Starship as a lander for the Artemis lunar program. The company beat out Blue Origin (which teamed up with key aerospace players like Lockheed Martin) and defense contractor Dynetics to secure the $2.9 billion contract. There are still funding hurdles for NASA to clear if it plans to fly as scheduled, but those missions are still years away at best. In the nearer future, Apple's Spring Loaded event is scheduled to take place on Tuesday and Chris Velazco has reminders of the rumors you should know about before it starts. New iPads and iMacs seem like safe bets, but we'll see if there are any big surprises in a few days.


Spotify launches voice-controlled 'Car Thing'

Mashable

Whether your road trip soundtracks consist of music, news, entertainment, or talk, Spotify's Car Thing has you covered. The new smart player, currently available to select users in the U.S., puts your audio library just a voice command, tap, turn, or swipe away. "Car Thing enables you to play your favorite audio faster, so you're already listening to that hit song or the latest podcast episode before you've even pulled out of the driveway," according to a Spotify blog announcement. "Switching between your favorite audio is effortless, allowing you to shift gears to something else as soon as the mood strikes." You will need a Spotify Premium account to use Car Thing, but setup is simple: plug the device into a 12-volt power outlet, sync it with your smartphone (iOS 14 and Android 8 or above), and connect your phone to the vehicle's stereo.


This week's best deals: $20 off Google's Nest Audio and more

Engadget

This week brought a bunch of deals on new gadgets, including Amazon's rotating Echo Show 10 and Google's Nest Hub. The former dropped to a new all-time low while the latter remains 20 percent off at various retailers. AirPods Pro are more than $50 off right now, and Amazon Prime members can snag the Fire TV Stick Lite for only $20. Here are the best tech deals from this week that you can still get today. The Nest Audio smart speaker is still $20 off across the web, bringing to down to $80.


The best smart speakers you can buy

Engadget

When Amazon first introduced Alexa and the Echo speaker six years ago, the idea of talking to a digital assistant wasn't totally novel. Both the iPhone and Android phones had semi-intelligent voice controls -- but with the Echo, Amazon took its first step toward making something like Alexa a constant presence in your home. Since then, Apple and Google have followed suit, and now there's a huge variety of smart speakers available at various price points. As the market exploded, the downsides of having a device that's always listening for a wake word have become increasingly apparent. They can get activated unintentionally, sending private recordings back to monolithic companies to analyze. And even at the best of times, giving more personal information to Amazon, Apple and Google can be a questionable decision. That said, all these companies have made it easier to manage how your data is used -- you can opt out of humans reviewing some of your voice queries, and it's also less complicated to manage and erase your history with various digital assistants, too. The good news is that there's never been a better time to get a smart speaker, particularly if you're a music fan.


Google tracking: what does Australian court ruling mean and how can I secure my devices?

The Guardian

If you have ever used Google Maps on your phone without fiddling with the location settings, it goes without saying that the tech giant knows everywhere you've been. The really bad news is that even if you have previously tried to stop Google tracking your every movement, the company may have done so anyway. On Friday the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) won a legal action in the federal court, which ruled that, thanks to a peculiar set-up that required a user to check "No" or "Do Not Collect" to both "Location History" and "Web & App Activity" on some Android and Pixel phones, someone who ticked "No" to just one would still end up being tracked. We asked Dr Katharine Kemp, a legal academic from the University of New South Wales whose focus is consumer law, and the Australian cryptographer Vanessa Teague for their thoughts on the significance of the decision and how a person might go about securing their devices. Kemp, an Apple user herself, says that for many consumers, today's decision may not actually mean much, as the decision only related to Android users and Google has since updated the settings that formed the basis of the ACCC's complaint.


Surveillance is All About the (Software) Brain

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Eyes are important, don't get me wrong. So are ears, noses, tongues, fingers, balance calibration organs and everything else that feeds that massive brain of yours.1 Salinity detectors in narwhals, electrical sensors in freshwater bottom feeders, echolocation in bats all provide sensory input that humans couldn't adequately process. Every beast has its own senses relevant to its own living conditions. Even your smartphone has cameras, microphones, gyroscopes, an accelerometer, a magnetometer, interfaces for phone/GPS/Bluetooth/WiFi, and some have a barometer, proximity sensors, and ambient light sensors. Biometric sensing equipment in today's phones can include optical, capacitive or ultrasonic fingerprint readers and an infrared map sensor for faces.


The iPhone 14 Pro might say goodbye to the notch and hello to a 48MP camera

Mashable

We're talkin' better camera sensors, an under-display Face ID system (yes, that means no more notch), and a canceled iPhone design. Here's what might be on deck for Apple's family of next-generation iPhone flagships. According to well-known Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, the company's "mini" lineup will end with the 5.4-inch iPhone 13 mini. In a research note seen by MacRumors, Kuo predicts the 2022 iPhones (a.k.a. the iPhone 14 line) will include "high-end 6.7-inch and 6.1-inch" models, as well as "lower-end 6.7-inch and 6.1-inch" options. I didn't have all that many complaints when I reviewed the iPhone 12 mini.


Council Post: Understanding What Artificial Intelligence Is, And What It's Not

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So goes the classic line from HBO's dystopian television series Westworld. The show depicts the growing consciousness, and later uprising, of android "hosts" from a western-themed amusement park. The phrase is the series' proverbial safeword, the recurring host admission that they are not, to the great relief of all Westworld guests, sentient beings. Westworld is the latest addition in the Hollywood tradition of sinister robots that gain intelligence, gain consciousness and go rogue. Blade Runner, The Terminator, The Matrix, Transcendence, Ex Machina... the list is long and, for many, a clear demonstration of why the full implications of artificial intelligence (AI) might not be worth the convenience it brings.