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Drew Barrymore says 'Bridgerton' inspired her to continue using dating apps

FOX News

Fox News Flash top entertainment and celebrity headlines are here. Check out what's clicking today in entertainment. Drew Barrymore is among the legion of fans who have been wrapped up in Netflix's latest hit, "Bridgerton." The "50 First Dates" and "Ever After" star invited Phoebe Dynevor and Regé-Jean Page on to her talk show to discuss the period drama. During their appearance on Friday, Barrymore revealed that the show's steamier scenes inspired the 45-year-old to try her hand once again at dating apps.


Oxford-BMS Fellowship

Oxford Comp Sci

Bristol Myers Squibb (BMS) is a global biopharmaceutical company making advancements in oncology, haematology, immunology and cardiovascular disease. BMS are dedicated to helping patients prevail over serious diseases through a diverse and promising pipeline and new scientific platforms. Prior to 2019, in partnership with the Oxford Medical Sciences Division, Celgene co-developed and provided support for fellowships which will continue as the Oxford-BMS Translational Research Fellowship Programme. The goals of this scheme are to stimulate new scientific discovery and translation and to facilitate skills and people transfer between researchers in academia and industry. This programme offers fellows an opportunity to gain exposure to the field of commercial drug discovery and development.


Bumble disabled its politics filter after it was used to out Capitol rioters

Engadget

The dating app Bumble has disabled its politics filter after it was supposedly used to reveal the identities of Capitol rioters, Mashable has reported. Bumble support posted on Twitter that it "temporarily removed our politics filter to prevent misuse," adding that it "prohibits any content that promotes terrorism or racial hatred." Bumble has promised in another tweet that it will "be reinstated in the future." It also stated that it has removed users confirmed as participants in the US Capitol attack. We've temporarily removed our politics filter to prevent misuse.


Amazon built a customized Alexa assistant that's coming to cars

Engadget

Amazon is opening up its AI tech to automakers and other third-companies with a new product called Alexa Custom Assistant. It will allow brands to build their own custom intelligent assistants that "co-exist" with Alexa, according to Amazon. That will allow them to create unique wake words, voices and capabilities "to each company's unique personality and customer needs," the company wrote in a press release. Alexa Custom Assistant will let customers use both Alexa and their own branded assistant to do something called "simultaneous multi-assistant cooperation. "This allows the brand's assistant to act as the product specialist, while Alexa is still available to help with everyday needs," Amazon wrote.


How I used open source to extend Apple's Home automation to more devices

ZDNet

I have to admit it: I backed the wrong horse when it came to driving home automation from a digital assistant and went with Microsoft's Cortana and its Harmon Kardon Invoke smart speakers. I had good enough reason: I trusted Microsoft's privacy commitments a lot more than either Amazon's or Google's, and Apple's Home relied on the too-expensive HomePod smart speakers. Sure, I had a couple of Amazon Echoes and a Google Nest Mini to try out those ecosystems, but their over-reliance on in-cloud voice recognition was that bit too much on the creepy side. Still, I could happily control my Hue lights from Cortana, though support for my Netatmo thermostats and Ikea Tradfri lights had to be through maker tools like IFTTT and workflow automation with webhook APIs like Power Automate or Zapier. But then Microsoft refocused Cortana on its commercial customers and announced that its Invoke Cortana integrations were due to be turned off early in 2021.


Phylodynamics for cell biologists

Science

Advances in experimental approaches for single-cell analysis allow in situ sequencing, genomic barcoding, and mapping of cell lineages within tissues and organisms. Large amounts of data have thus accumulated and present an analytical challenge. Stadler et al. recognized the need for conceptual and computational approaches to fully exploit these technological advances for the understanding of normal and disease states. The authors review ideas taken from phylodynamics of infectious disease and show how similar tree-building techniques can be applied to monitoring changes in somatic cell lineages for applications ranging from development and differentiation to cancer biology. Science , this issue p. [eaah6266][1] ### BACKGROUND The birth, death, and diversification of individuals are events that drive biological processes across all scales. This is true whether the individuals in question represent nucleic acids, cells, whole organisms, populations, or species. The ancestral relationships of individuals can be visualized as branching trees or phylogenies, which are long-established representations in the fields of evolution, ecology, and epidemiology. Molecular phylogenetics is the discipline concerned with the reconstruction of such trees from gene or genome sequence data. The shape and size of such phylogenies depend on the past birth and death processes that generated them, and in phylodynamics, mathematical models are used to infer and quantify the dynamical behavior of biological populations from ancestral relationships. New technological advances in genetics and cell biology have led to a growing body of data about the molecular state and ancestry of individual cells in multicellular organisms. Ideas from phylogenetics and phylodynamics are being applied to these data to investigate many questions in tissue formation and tumorigenesis. ### ADVANCES Trees offer a valuable framework for tracing cell division and change through time, beginning with individual ancestral stem cells or fertilized eggs and resulting in complex tissues, tumors, or whole organisms (see the figure). They also provide the basis for computational and statistical methods with which to analyze data from cell biology. Our Review explains how “tree-thinking” and phylodynamics can be beneficial to the interpretation of empirical data pertaining to the individual cells of multicellular organisms. We summarize some recent research questions in developmental and cancer biology and briefly introduce the new technologies that allow us to observe the spatiotemporal histories of cell division and change. We provide an overview of the various and sometimes confusing ways in which graphical models, based on or represented by trees, have been applied in cell biology. To provide conceptual clarity, we outline four distinct graphical representations of the history of cell division and differentiation in multicellular organisms. We highlight that cells from an organism cannot be always treated as statistically independent observations but instead are often correlated because of phylogenetic history, and we explain how this can cause difficulties when attempting to infer dynamical behavior from experimental single-cell data. We introduce simple ecological null models for cell populations and illustrate some potential pitfalls in hypothesis testing and the need for quantitative phylodynamic models that explicitly incorporate the dependencies caused by shared ancestry. ### OUTLOOK We expect the rapid growth in the number of cell-level phylogenies to continue, a trend enhanced by ongoing technological advances in cell lineage tracing, genomic barcoding, and in situ sequencing. In particular, we anticipate the generation of exciting datasets that combine phenotypic measurements for individual cells (such as through transcriptome sequencing) with high-resolution reconstructions of the ancestry of the sampled cells. These developments will offer new ways to study developmental, oncogenic, and immunological processes but will require new and appropriate conceptual and computational tools. We discuss how models from phylogenetics and phylodynamics will benefit the interpretation of the data sets generated in the foreseeable future and will aid the development of statistical tests that exploit, and are robust to, cell shared ancestry. We hope that our discussion will initiate the integration of cell-level phylodynamic approaches into experimental and theoretical studies of development, cancer, and immunology. We sketch out some of the theoretical advances that will be required to analyze complex spatiotemporal cell dynamics and encourage explorations of these new directions. Powerful new statistical and computational tools are essential if we are to exploit fully the wealth of new experimental data being generated in cell biology. ![Figure][2] Multicellular organisms develop from a single fertilized egg. The division, apoptosis, and differentiation of cells can be displayed in a development tree, with the fertilized egg being the root of the tree. The development of any particular tissue within an organism can be traced as a subtree of the full developmental tree. Subtrees that represent cancer tumors or B cell clones may exhibit rapid growth and genetic change. Here, we illustrate the developmental tree of a human and expand the subtree representing haematopoiesis (blood formation) in the bone marrow. Stem cells in the bone marrow differentiate, giving rise to the numerous blood cell types in humans. The structure of the tree that underlies haematopoiesis and the formation of all tissues is unclear. Phylogenetic and phylodynamic tools can help to describe and statistically explore questions about this cell differentiation process. Multicellular organisms are composed of cells connected by ancestry and descent from progenitor cells. The dynamics of cell birth, death, and inheritance within an organism give rise to the fundamental processes of development, differentiation, and cancer. Technical advances in molecular biology now allow us to study cellular composition, ancestry, and evolution at the resolution of individual cells within an organism or tissue. Here, we take a phylogenetic and phylodynamic approach to single-cell biology. We explain how “tree thinking” is important to the interpretation of the growing body of cell-level data and how ecological null models can benefit statistical hypothesis testing. Experimental progress in cell biology should be accompanied by theoretical developments if we are to exploit fully the dynamical information in single-cell data. [1]: /lookup/doi/10.1126/science.aah6266 [2]: pending:yes


Transmission heterogeneities, kinetics, and controllability of SARS-CoV-2

Science

A minority of people infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmit most infections. How does this happen? Sun et al. reconstructed transmission in Hunan, China, up to April 2020. Such detailed data can be used to separate out the relative contribution of transmission control measures aimed at isolating individuals relative to population-level distancing measures. The authors found that most of the secondary transmissions could be traced back to a minority of infected individuals, and well over half of transmission occurred in the presymptomatic phase. Furthermore, the duration of exposure to an infected person combined with closeness and number of household contacts constituted the greatest risks for transmission, particularly when lockdown conditions prevailed. These findings could help in the design of infection control policies that have the potential to minimize both virus transmission and economic strain. Science , this issue p. [eabe2424][1] ### INTRODUCTION The role of transmission heterogeneities in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) dynamics remains unclear, particularly those heterogeneities driven by demography, behavior, and interventions. To understand individual heterogeneities and their effect on disease control, we analyze detailed contact-tracing data from Hunan, a province in China adjacent to Hubei and one of the first regions to experience a SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in January to March 2020. The Hunan outbreak was swiftly brought under control by March 2020 through a combination of nonpharmaceutical interventions including population-level mobility restriction (i.e., lockdown), traveler screening, case isolation, contact tracing, and quarantine. In parallel, highly detailed epidemiological information on SARS-CoV-2–infected individuals and their close contacts was collected by the Hunan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention. ### RATIONALE Contact-tracing data provide information to reconstruct transmission chains and understand outbreak dynamics. These data can in turn generate valuable intelligence on key epidemiological parameters and risk factors for transmission, which paves the way for more-targeted and cost-effective interventions. ### RESULTS On the basis of epidemiological information and exposure diaries on 1178 SARS-CoV-2–infected individuals and their 15,648 close contacts, we developed a series of statistical and computational models to stochastically reconstruct transmission chains, identify risk factors for transmission, and infer the infectiousness profile over the course of a typical infection. We observe overdispersion in the distribution of secondary infections, with 80% of secondary cases traced back to 15% of infections, which indicates substantial transmission heterogeneities. We find that SARS-CoV-2 transmission risk scales positively with the duration of exposure and the closeness of social interactions, with the highest per-contact risk estimated in the household. Lockdown interventions increase transmission risk in families and households, whereas the timely isolation of infected individuals reduces risk across all types of contacts. There is a gradient of increasing susceptibility with age but no significant difference in infectivity by age or clinical severity. Early isolation of SARS-CoV-2–infected individuals drastically alters transmission kinetics, leading to shorter generation and serial intervals and a higher fraction of presymptomatic transmission. After adjusting for the censoring effects of isolation, we find that the infectiousness profile of a typical SARS-CoV-2 patient peaks just before symptom onset, with 53% of transmission occurring in the presymptomatic phase in an uncontrolled setting. We then use these results to evaluate the effectiveness of individual-based strategies (case isolation and contact quarantine) both alone and in combination with population-level contact reductions. We find that a plausible parameter space for SARS-CoV-2 control is restricted to scenarios where interventions are synergistically combined, owing to the particular transmission kinetics of this virus. ### CONCLUSION There is considerable heterogeneity in SARS-CoV-2 transmission owing to individual differences in biology and contacts that is modulated by the effects of interventions. We estimate that about half of secondary transmission events occur in the presymptomatic phase of a primary case in uncontrolled outbreaks. Achieving epidemic control requires that isolation and contact-tracing interventions are layered with population-level approaches, such as mask wearing, increased teleworking, and restrictions on large gatherings. Our study also demonstrates the value of conducting high-quality contact-tracing investigations to advance our understanding of the transmission dynamics of an emerging pathogen. ![Figure][2] Transmission chains, contact patterns, and transmission kinetics of SARS-CoV-2 in Hunan, China, based on case and contact-tracing data from Hunan, China. (Top left) One realization of the reconstructed transmission chains, with a histogram representing overdispersion in the distribution of secondary infections. (Top right) Contact matrices of community, social, extended family, and household contacts reveal distinct age profiles. (Bottom) Earlier isolation of primary infections shortens the generation and serial intervals while increasing the relative contribution of transmission in the presymptomatic phase. A long-standing question in infectious disease dynamics concerns the role of transmission heterogeneities, which are driven by demography, behavior, and interventions. On the basis of detailed patient and contact-tracing data in Hunan, China, we find that 80% of secondary infections traced back to 15% of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) primary infections, which indicates substantial transmission heterogeneities. Transmission risk scales positively with the duration of exposure and the closeness of social interactions and is modulated by demographic and clinical factors. The lockdown period increases transmission risk in the family and households, whereas isolation and quarantine reduce risks across all types of contacts. The reconstructed infectiousness profile of a typical SARS-CoV-2 patient peaks just before symptom presentation. Modeling indicates that SARS-CoV-2 control requires the synergistic efforts of case isolation, contact quarantine, and population-level interventions because of the specific transmission kinetics of this virus. [1]: /lookup/doi/10.1126/science.abe2424 [2]: pending:yes


Code Adam Gradient Descent Optimization From Scratch

#artificialintelligence

Gradient descent is an optimization algorithm that follows the negative gradient of an objective function in order to locate the minimum of the function. A limitation of gradient descent is that a single step size (learning rate) is used for all input variables. Extensions to gradient descent like AdaGrad and RMSProp update the algorithm to use a separate step size for each input variable but may result in a step size that rapidly decreases to very small values. The Adaptive Movement Estimation algorithm, or Adam for short, is an extension to gradient descent and a natural successor to techniques like AdaGrad and RMSProp that automatically adapts a learning rate for each input variable for the objective function and further smooths the search process by using an exponentially decreasing moving average of the gradient to make updates to variables. In this tutorial, you will discover how to develop gradient descent with Adam optimization algorithm from scratch.


Guest Mode now available on Google Assistant

ZDNet

Google has introduced Guest Mode to Google Assistant to give users the chance to ensure their interactions with their Google smart speakers or displays, including Nest Audio and Nest Hub Max, are not saved to their account when this new mode is switched on. When Guest Mode is switched on, users will be able to continue to ask questions, control smart home devices, set timers, and play music, but will not be able to access personal results, such as calendar entries or contacts, until Guest Mode is switched off. Google added the device will also automatically delete audio recordings and Google Assistant activity from the device owner's account when in Guest Mode. However, if users are interacting with other apps and services, such as Google Maps, YouTube, or other media and smart home services while in Guest Mode, those apps may still save that activity, Google said. To switch on Guest Mode, it is a matter of users saying, "Hey Google, turn on Guest Mode", before the device plays a special chime and a guest icon is displayed.


Stressed out? Blame bad technology.

The Japan Times

New York – There is no question that we are all more dependent on technology than ever. So what happens when that tech does not work? In the past, Emily Dreyfuss used an old-school strategy: She yelled. When Amazon's Alexa spat out wrong answers or misunderstood questions, Dreyfuss let the virtual assistant have it. "I used her as a scapegoat for my feelings," said Dreyfuss, a writer and editor for Harvard's Shorenstein Center.