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Canadian city using AI to predict who might become homeless

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TORONTO – As makeshift tent cities spring up across Canada to house rough sleepers who fear using shelters due to COVID-19, one city is leveraging artificial intelligence (AI) to predict which residents risk becoming homeless. Computer programmers working for the city of London, Ontario, 170km southwest of the provincial capital Toronto, say the new system is the first of its kind anywhere – and it could offer insights for other regions grappling with homelessness. "Shelters are just packed to the brim across the country right now," said Jonathan Rivard, London's Homeless Prevention Manager, who works on the AI system. "We need to do a better job of providing resources to individuals before they hit rock bottom, not once they do," he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. Canada is seeing a second wave of coronavirus cases, with Ontario's government warning the province could experience "worst-case scenarios seen in northern Italy and New York City" if trends continue.


Enterprises Will Push AI To New Frontiers In 2021: Report

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San Francisco: In 2021, one in four forward-thinking enterprises will push Artificial Intelligence to new frontiers, such as holographic meetings for remote work and on-demand personalised manufacturing, according to new predictions by Forrester Research. They will gamify strategic planning, build simulations in the boardroom, and move into intelligent edge experiences, said the report. Consultancies like Capgemini, EY, and KPMG will provide strategy and governance chops, while software companies like DataRobot, IBM, and Tecton will provide scale and speed to fuel this imagination, it added. Build your internal AI team, engage consultancies to implement domain-specific solutions, and upgrade your data, analytics, and machine learning (ML) platforms to rethink how you use AI," Forrester advised. But here are many deterrents to AI success -- a lack of trust, poor data quality, data paucity, a lack of imagination, and a dearth of the right power tools to scale.


Artificial intelligence helps classify new craters on Mars – IAM Network

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An innovative artificial intelligence (AI) tool developed by NASA has helped identify a cluster of craters on Mars that formed within the last decade.The new machine-learning algorithm, an automated fresh impact crater classifier, was created by researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in California -- and represents the first time artificial intelligence has been used to identify previously unknown craters on the Red Planet, according to a statement from NASA. Scientists have fed the algorithm more than 112,000 images taken by the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The program is designed to scan the photos for changes to Martian surface features that are indicative of new craters. In the case of the algorithm's first batch of finds, scientists think these craters formed from a meteor impact between March 2010 and May 2012. Related: Latest photos from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter"AI can't do the kind of skilled analysis a scientist can," Kiri Wagstaff, JPL computer scientist, said in the statement.


Artificial intelligence helps classify new craters on Mars

#artificialintelligence

An innovative artificial intelligence (AI) tool developed by NASA has helped identify a cluster of craters on Mars that formed within the last decade. The new machine-learning algorithm, an automated fresh impact crater classifier, was created by researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in California -- and represents the first time artificial intelligence has been used to identify previously unknown craters on the Red Planet, according to a statement from NASA. Scientists have fed the algorithm more than 112,000 images taken by the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The program is designed to scan the photos for changes to Martian surface features that are indicative of new craters. In the case of the algorithm's first batch of finds, scientists think these craters formed from a meteor impact between March 2010 and May 2012.


NPS' Data Science, AI Certificate Programs Support DOD Workforce Development

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On Sept. 9, during the DOD's semi-annual Artificial Intelligence Symposium and Exposition, Secretary of Defense Mark Esper affirmed that the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center (JAIC) in partnership with the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and Defense Acquisition University will collaboratively develop an intensive six-week pilot course delivered to more than 80 defense acquisition professionals of all ranks and grades. "These trainees will learn how to apply AI and data science skills to our operations," Esper said in his remarks. "With the support of Congress, the Department plans to request additional funding for the services to grow this effort over time and deliver an AI-ready workforce to the American people." Just as the university's highly-regarded Harnessing Artificial Intelligence video course paved the way for its support of the pilot course, NPS is well positioned to support Esper's declaration for further workforce development through its existing Data Science Certificate, and an upcoming similar certificate program in Artificial Intelligence. In the ongoing effort to expand the Navy's knowledge and expertise in the fields of data science and artificial intelligence, NPS faculty have developed courses that enable students to quickly gain insights in these critical disciplines.


Can AI and Robotics Disrupt the Defence Industry?

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The defence industry technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics are changing the industry and enable intelligent warfare in the decades to come. These emerging technologies will have a significant impact on defence contractors. Integrating AI into the design of traditional battle networks will immensely improve the performance of current platforms and forces soon. Prime contractors will maintain an advantage during this phase. However, as robotics and AI's capabilities arrive at an inflection point, the U.S Department of Defence will switch to smaller AI-and robotics-based systems.


The US has a good record on fighting monopolies. Now it's Google's turn

The Guardian

Sundar Pichai, chief executive of Alphabet, Google's parent company, is a mild-mannered software engineer who is not good at games of verbal fisticuffs with US politicians. He received a drubbing last month during the "big tech" congressional hearing. Pichai can, however, summon lawyers and lobbyists galore as soon as the game gets more serious, which it definitely has. The US Department of Justice (DoJ) last week launched a huge and historic antitrust case against Google, accusing the tech company of abusing its position to maintain an illegal monopoly over internet searches and search advertising. In response, Kent Walker, Google's chief lawyer, published an indignant blogpost that signalled how the firm will fight this.


The Amazing Ways Duolingo Is Using Artificial Intelligence To Deliver Free Language Learning

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It's a challenge to learn a new language, especially once we're past 18 years old. But Duolingo, self-proclaimed as "the world's best way to learn a language" and seconded by reviewers at the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, is set to change that with an assist from artificial intelligence (AI). Duolingo launched in 2011, and through a powerful mix of personalized learning, immediate feedback and gamification/rewards, it has become one of the most downloaded educational apps today. Let's take a look at how artificial intelligence helps the company deliver personalized language lessons to its 300 million users. Founded in Pittsburgh by Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist Luis von Ahn, who is renowned for creating CAPTCHA, Duolingo's mission is to "make education free and accessible to everyone in the world."


In Collaboration with the National Institutes of Health, IBM Research Dives Deep into Biomarkers of Schizophrenia

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Sinai School of Medicine, Stanford University and the Northern California Institute for Research and Education, IBM Research is undertaking a new research initiative funded by the National Institutes of Health. As part of a broader $99 million, 5-year research initiative spanning multiple public and private organizations and research institutions, this work will tap into AI and big data to help better identify individuals at high-risk of developing schizophrenia, a serious mental illness affecting how a person thinks, feels and behaves. Schizophrenia is often characterized by alterations to a person's thoughts, feelings and behaviors, which can include a loss of contact with reality known as psychosis. A better understanding of how this disease could be detected prior to psychosis could help to postpone or even prevent the transition to psychosis, as well as possibly improve outcomes. The project is a component of the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP), a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), pharmaceutical companies, biotech firms and nonprofit organizations.


Dr Anthony Loschner: Artificial Intelligence Can Benefit Underserved Populations – IAM Network

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Artificial intelligence allows underserved populations to gain access to a radiologist, pointed out Anthony L. Loschner, MD, assistant professor and associate program director, Critical Care Fellowship Program, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine. Artificial intelligence allows underserved populations to gain access to a radiologist by just clicking a snapshot on their cell phone, said Anthony L. Loschner, MD, assistant professor and associate program director, Critical Care Fellowship Program, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, about his presentation at this year's CHEST meeting.TranscriptIntroduce us to the use of artificial intelligence in pulmonary medicine.The title of my presentation was "Artificial Intelligence in Pulmonary Medicine: The Rise of the Machines." And we reviewed the major articles that had been published in the last year or so guiding future AI in pulmonary medicine.There were some reviews that were done, literature reviews, where I reviewed articles on how AI is currently being used. Examples include great work by a Stanford team called ChestNet, and they're using a deep learning algorithm to read chest x-rays on any media pretty much.