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The German Constitution May Protect A Right To Human Driving

#artificialintelligence

Volkswagen recently interviewed a former German constitutional judge, Professor Udo di Fabio. When asked about how Germany's constitution would treat autonomous vehicles, he offered some insight, including both allowing autonomous vehicles and whether manual driving will be allowed after the technology matures. One key quote, which this article will put in context: "People should be able to decide whether to surrender the steering wheel or not." Before I go on, I need to apologize to any German readers, because the rest of us need some key background that you probably got in school. Feel free to skip ahead if you are already familiar with Germany's constitution and its history.


AI could generate more revenue than human workers by the end of the decade

#artificialintelligence

In less than a decade, you'll earn your company less money than artificial intelligence. This is according to a new forecast by software company Citrix, which paints a picture in which the rise of AI will afford humans more time to focus on creative and strategic work. The forecast was arrived at through a combination of detailed scenario planning, and a survey of 1,200 business leaders in the UK, France, Germany and The Netherlands. The majority of respondents believe every organization will have a Chief Artificial Intelligence Officer (CAI) by 2035, tasked with helping the CEO make business decisions. Some even think that "traditional leadership" might be subverted within a decade, with AI responsible for making most business decisions.


WWII: Enigma machine used by the Nazis to send secret messages found in the Baltic Sea

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Divers recovered the device at the bottom of Gelting Bay, on Germany's northern coast, while working to remove abandoned fishing nets that threaten marine life. Designed shortly after WWI by the engineer Arthur Scherbius for commercial usage, the cipher engine was adopted by many national governments and militaries. The portable device is best-known for its use by the Axis powers to encode military commands, for safe transmission by radio, as part of their rapid'blitzkrieg' strategy. Enigma featured a number of wheels, which together formed an electric circuit that repeatedly scrambled an entered character -- and reconfigured after each letter. German military models -- made more complex through the addition of a plugboard, for added scrambling -- and their codebooks were highly sought by the allies.


This AI vision startup, Recogni, has its sights set on enabling fully autonomous vehicles

#artificialintelligence

With a mission to design a novel vision-oriented artificial intelligence platform, this Silicon Valley-based startup, Recogni, is the only solution on the market that has the performance and efficiency necessary to enable fully autonomous vehicles (AVs). The company is headquartered in San Jose, California, with operations in Munich, Germany. It is backed by leading venture capital firms, including GreatPoint Ventures, Toyota AI Ventures, BMWi Ventures, Faurecia, Fluxunit – OSRAM Ventures, and DNS Capital. Recogni's system could deliver unprecedented inference performance through novel edge processing, allowing vehicles to see farther and make driving decisions faster than humans while consuming minimal amounts of energy. The auto industry is experiencing an evolution to vehicle autonomy Current solutions are based on repurposing legacy technology, constraining their performance and efficiency, rendering them ineffective with regards to enabling full vehicle autonomy.


PODCAST Artificial Connect uses AI to generate automated local event announcements

#artificialintelligence

In the in the local market, especially if it comes to local journalism and to the event market and the first time we heard that we thought well that, that's interesting and then we I think we went on with our other projects and the second time we heard another customer telling us about the same problem, we got more and more interested in that and then we asked a lot of media companies in Germany, what they are thinking about this specific problem and if we would solve that problem would that be a high would that provide a high value, if we would develop an automated solution for this specific task. So most of of the directors and so on we spoke to.


Turing Test At 70: Still Relevant For AI (Artificial Intelligence)?

#artificialintelligence

ENGLAND - 1958: English Electric developed several notable pioneering computers during the 1950s. The DEUCE took up a huge space compared to modern computers and worked from 1450 thermionic valves which grew hot, blow outs were frequent. However the DEUCE proved a popular innovation and some models were working in to the 1970s. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. When computers were still in the nascent stages, Alan Turing published his legendary paper, "Computing Machinery And Intelligence," in the Mind journal in 1950.


Turing Test At 70: Still Relevant For AI (Artificial Intelligence)?

#artificialintelligence

ENGLAND - 1958: English Electric developed several notable pioneering computers during the 1950s. The DEUCE took up a huge space compared to modern computers and worked from 1450 thermionic valves which grew hot, blow outs were frequent. However the DEUCE proved a popular innovation and some models were working in to the 1970s. Photograph by Walter Nurnberg who transformed industrial photography after WWII using film studio lighting techniques. When computers were still in the nascent stages, Alan Turing published his legendary paper, "Computing Machinery And Intelligence," in the Mind journal in 1950.


Artificial Intelligence and Human Lives: Looking forwards 2025-2070

#artificialintelligence

In the darkest days of a dark year it's good to think about our possible futures together. This talk is about wealth, power, and intelligence, and how we are communicating these due to the digital transformation. Is there a chance for a positive digital future, and if so what would it look like? Joanna Bryson is Professor of Ethics and Technology at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin, Germany. She holds degrees in psychology and artificial intelligence from the University of Chicago (BA), the University of Edinburgh (MSc and MPhil), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (PhD).


Briefly Noted Book Reviews

The New Yorker

Philosophers have long debated the nature of consciousness. This probing study takes an evolutionary approach, examining "experience in general" not only in humans but in much of the animal kingdom. Animals, it argues, developed consciousness gradually, through such biological innovations as centralized nervous systems and the ability to distinguish one's actions from external forces, which have given rise to "varieties of subjectivity." The author is crisp on a subject notorious for abstraction, dissecting fuzzy philosophical metaphors and weaving in lively descriptions of the octopuses, whale sharks, and banded shrimp he observes on scuba dives off the coasts of Australia. Born in 1797 in Düsseldorf, then under Napoleonic occupation, Heine remained a committed liberal even as Germany turned inward after the Congress of Vienna.


'Better off thanks to China': German companies double down on resurgent giant

The Japan Times

BERLIN – German industrial robot-maker Hahn Automation plans to invest millions of euros in new factories in China over the next three years, keen to capitalize on an economy that's rebounding more rapidly than others from the COVID-19 crisis. "If we want to grow with the Chinese market, we have to manufacture on the ground," Chief Executive Frank Konrad said of the investment drive, intended to skirt Chinese export hurdles in what Beijing views as a strategic sector. "Our goal is to make up to 25% of our sales in China by 2025," he said, up from roughly 10% now. But while the Chinese recovery may be good news for companies like Hahn, it is complicating efforts by Chancellor Angela Merkel's government to diversify trade relations and become less dependent on Asia's rising superpower. Despite Berlin's concerns, German industry is deepening ties with China, which battled the pandemic with stricter measures than other countries, moved out of a first lockdown earlier and saw demand rebound more quickly. Olaf Kiesewetter, CEO of car sensor supplier UST in Thuringia in eastern Germany, shares the same ambition of making 25% of sales in China.