AI Magazine


AAAI Conferences Calendar

AI Magazine

This page includes forthcoming AAAI sponsored conferences, conferences presented by AAAI Affiliates, and conferences held in cooperation with AAAI.



Fifteenth International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Law (ICAIL 2015)

AI Magazine

The 15th International Conference on AI and Law (ICAIL 2015) will be held in San Diego, California, USA, June 8-12, 2015, at the University of San Diego, at the Kroc Institute, under the auspices of the International Association for Artificial Intelligence and Law (IAAIL), an organization devoted to promoting research and development in the field of AI and law with members throughout the world. The conference is held in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and with ACM SIGAI (the Special Interest Group on Artificial Intelligence of the Association for Computing Machinery).


A Report on the Ninth International Web Rule Symposium

AI Magazine

The annual International Web Rule Symposium (RuleML) is an international conference on research, applications, languages and standards for rule technologies. RuleML is a leading conference to build bridges between academe and industry in the field of rules and its applications, especially as part of the semantic technology stack. It is devoted to rule-based programming and rule-based systems including production rules systems, logic programming rule engines, and business rule engines/business rule management systems; semantic web rule languages and rule standards; rule-based event processing languages (EPLs) and technologies; and research on inference rules, transformation rules, decision rules, production rules, and ECA rules. The 9th International Web Rule Symposium (RuleML 2015) was held in Berlin, Germany, August 2-5. This report summarizes the events of that conference.


Summary Report of The First International Competition on Computational Models of Argumentation

AI Magazine

We review the First International Competition on Computational Models of Argumentation (ICMMA’15). The competition evaluated submitted solvers performance on four different computational tasks related to solving abstract argumentation frameworks. Each task evaluated solvers in ways that pushed the edge of existing performance by introducing new challenges. Despite being the first competition in this area, the high number of competitors entered, and differences in results, suggest that the competition will help shape the landscape of ongoing developments in argumentation theory solvers.


Cognitive Prosthetics for Fostering Learning: A View from the Learning Sciences

AI Magazine

This article is aimed at helping AI researchers and practitioners imagine roles intelligent technologies might play in the many different and varied ecosystems in which people learn. My observations are based on learning sciences research of the past several decades, the possibilities of new technologies of the past few years, and my experience as program officer for the National Science Foundation’s Cyberlearning and Future Learning Technologies program. My thesis is that new technologies have potential to transform possibilities for fostering learning in both formal and informal learning environments by making it possible and manageable for learners to engage in the kinds of project work that professionals engage in and learn important content, skills, practices, habits, and dispositions from those experiences. The expertise of AI researchers and practitioners is critical to that vision, but it will require teaming up with others — for example, technology imagineers, educators, and learning scientists.


Control Strategies and Artificial Intelligence in Rehabilitation Robotics

AI Magazine

Rehabilitation robots physically support and guide a patient's limb during motor therapy, but require sophisticated control algorithms and artificial intelligence to do so. This article provides an overview of the state of the art in this area. It begins with the dominant paradigm of assistive control, from impedance-based cooperative controller through electromyography and intention estimation. It then covers challenge-based algorithms, which provide more difficult and complex tasks for the patient to perform through resistive control and error augmentation. Furthermore, it describes exercise adaptation algorithms that change the overall exercise intensity based on the patient's performance or physiological responses, as well as socially assistive robots that provide only verbal and visual guidance. The article concludes with a discussion of the current challenges in rehabilitation robot software: evaluating existing control strategies in a clinical setting as well as increasing the robot's autonomy using entirely new artificial intelligence techniques.


Human-Centered Design of Wearable Neuroprostheses and Exoskeletons

AI Magazine

Human-centered design of wearable robots involves the development of innovative science and technologies that minimize the mismatch between humans’ and machines’ capabilities, leading to their intuitive integration and confluent interaction. Here, we summarize our human-centered approach to the design of closed-loop brain-machine interfaces (BMI) to powered prostheses and exoskeletons that allow people to act beyond their impaired or diminished physical or sensory-motor capabilities. The goal is to develop multifunctional human-machine interfaces with integrated diagnostic, assistive and therapeutic functions. Moreover, these complex human-machine systems should be effective, reliable, safe and engaging and support the patient in performing intended actions with minimal effort and errors with adequate interaction time. To illustrate our approach, we review an example of a user-in-the-loop, patient-centered, non-invasive BMI system to a powered exoskeleton for persons with paraplegia. We conclude with a summary of challenges to the translation of these complex human-machine systems to the end-user.


Human-Centered Cognitive Orthoses: Artificial Intelligence for, Rather than Instead of, the People

AI Magazine

This issue of AI Magazine includes six articles on cognitive orthoses, which we broadly conceive as technological approaches that amplify or enhance individual or team cognition across a wide range of goals and activities. The articles are grouped by how they relate to orthoses enhanced socio-technical team intelligence at three different cognitive levels—sensorimotor physical, professional learning, and networked knowledge.


Cognitive Orthoses: Toward Human-Centered AI

AI Magazine

This introduction focuses on how human-centered computing (HCC) is changing the way that people think about information technology. The AI perspective views this HCC framework as embodying a systems view, in which human thought and action are linked and equally important in terms of analysis, design, and evaluation. This emerging technology provides a new research outlook for AI applications, with new research goals and agendas.