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AAAI News

AI Magazine

Submissions for HCOMP-19 Are Due in June! The Seventh AAAI Conference on Human Computation and Crowdsourcing (HCOMP 2019) will be held October 28-30 at Skamania Lodge in Washington State near the Columbia Gorge River, just 45 minutes from Portland, Oregon. This year is the 10-year anniversary of the very first HCOMP workshop in Paris, and to celebrate, there will be special events, talks, and panels throughout the conference. HCOMP is the premier venue for disseminating the latest research findings on crowdsourcing and human computation. While artificial intelligence (AI) and human-computer interaction (HCI) represent traditional mainstays of the conference, HCOMP believes strongly in inviting, fostering, and promoting broad, interdisciplinary research.


Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, Ethics, and the Military: A Canadian Perspective

AI Magazine

Defense and security organizations depend upon science and technology to meet operational needs, predict and counter threats, and meet increasingly complex demands of modern warfare. Artificial intelligence and robotics could provide solutions to a wide range of military gaps and deficiencies. At the same time, the unique and rapidly evolving nature of AI and robotics challenges existing polices, regulations, and values, and introduces complex ethical issues that might impede their development, evaluation, and use by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). Early consideration of potential ethical issues raised by military use of emerging AI and robotics technologies in development is critical to their effective implementation. This article presents an ethics assessment framework for emerging AI and robotics technologies. It is designed to help technology developers, policymakers, decision makers, and other stakeholders identify and broadly consider potential ethical issues that might arise with the military use and integration of emerging AI and robotics technologies of interest. We also provide a contextual environment for our framework, as well as an example of how our framework can be applied to a specific technology. Finally, we briefly identify and address several pervasive issues that arose during our research.


The AI Bookie

AI Magazine

The AI Bookie column documents highlights from AI Bets, an online forum for the creation of adjudicatable predictions, in the form of bets, about the future of AI. While it is easy to make broad, generalized, or off-the-cuff predictions about the future, it is more difficult to develop predictions that are carefully thought out, concrete, and measurable. This forum was created to help researchers craft predictions whose accuracy can be clearly and unambiguously judged when the bets come due. The bets will be documented both online and regularly in this column. We encourage bets that are rigorously and scientifically argued. We discourage bets that are too general to be evaluated or too specific to an individual or institution. The goal is not to continue to feed the media frenzy and outsized pundit predictions about AI, but rather to curate and promote bets whose outcomes will provide useful feedback to the scientific community. For detailed guidelines and to place bets, visit sciencebets.org.


Deep Models, Machine Learning, and Artificial Intelligence Applications in National and International Security

AI Magazine

These technologies have revolutionized many commercial applications, but they are not currently designed to solve security problems. At best, they are suitable for fast recommendations. Therefore, there exists a fundamental instability in the learned functions. This trust issue is only one of the major issues with using deep learning for security applications. A second issue is the data requirements.


Reinforcement Learning: Connections, Surprises, and Challenge

AI Magazine

The idea of implementing reinforcement learning in a computer was one of the earliest ideas about the possibility of AI, but reinforcement learning remained on the margin of AI until relatively recently. Today we see reinforcement learning playing essential roles in some of the most impressive AI applications. This article presents observations from the author’s personal experience with reinforcement learning over the most recent 40 years of its history in AI, focusing on striking connections that emerged between largely separate disciplines and on some of the findings that surprised him along the way. These connections and surprises place reinforcement learning in a historical context, and they help explain the success it is finding in modern AI. The article concludes by discussing some of the challenges that need to be faced as reinforcement learning moves out into real world.


AAAI Conferences Calendar

AI Magazine

This page includes forthcoming AAAI sponsored conferences, conferences presented by AAAI Affiliates, and conferences held in cooperation with AAAI. AI Magazine also maintains a calendar listing that includes nonaffiliated conferences at www.aaai.org/Magazine/calendar.php. ICAIL-2019 will be held 17-21 June in USA. SoCS-19 will be held July 16-17 2019 (immediately AAAI Fall Symposium Series. IAAI-20 Conference will be held February 9-11, 2020 at the Hilton New York Midtown Hotel in New York, New York USA.


No AI Is an Island: The Case for Teaming Intelligence

AI Magazine

The purpose of this article is to draw attention to an aspect of intelligence that has not yet received significant attention from the AI community, but that plays a crucial role in a technology’s effectiveness in the world, namely teaming intelligence. We propose that Al will reach its full potential only if, as part of its intelligence, it also has enough teaming intelligence to work well with people. Although seemingly counterintuitive, the more intelligent the technological system, the greater the need for collaborative skills. This paper will argue why teaming intelligence is important to AI, provide a general structure for AI researchers to use in developing intelligent systems that team well, assess the current state of the art and, in doing so, suggest a path forward for future AI systems. This is not a call to develop a new capability, but rather, an approach to what AI capabilities should be built, and how, so as to imbue intelligent systems with teaming competence.


Nicolas de Condorcet and the First Intelligence Explosion Hypothesis

AI Magazine

The intelligence explosion hypothesis (for example, a technological singularity) is roughly the hypothesis that accelerating knowledge or technological growth radically changes humanity. While 20th-century figures are commonly credited as the first discoverers of the hypothesis, I assert that Nicolas de Condorcet, the 18th-century mathematician, is the earliest to (1) mathematically model an intelligence explosion, and (2) present an accelerating historical worldview, and (3) make intelligence explosion predictions that were restated centuries later. Condorcet provides insights on how ontology and social choice can help resolve value alignment.


Artificial Intelligence — An Enabler of Naval Tactical Decision Superiority

AI Magazine

Artificial intelligence, as a capability enhancer, offers significant improvements to our tactical warfighting advantage. AI provides methods for fusing and analyzing data to enhance our knowledge of the tactical environment; it provides methods for generating and assessing decision options from multidimensional, complex situations; and it provides predictive analytics to identify and examine the effects of tactical courses of action. Machine learning can improve these processes in an evolutionary manner. Advanced computing techniques can handle highly heterogeneous and vast datasets and can synchronize knowledge across distributed warfare assets. This article presents concepts for applying AI to various aspects of tactical battle management and discusses their potential improvements to future warfare.


Moral Orthoses: A New Approach to Human and Machine Ethics

AI Magazine

XAI, explainable AI, and the DARPA program to provide that. The European Commission has legislated a demand (Order GDPR 2016/2679) specifying that deployed machine learning systems must explain their decisions. The commission has done this even though no one knows how to provide what they are requiring. What would follow if we and machines are in roughly the same position with respect to the transparency of our ethical decision-making? I want to reintroduce the notion of orthosis into ethical explanation: medically, an orthosis is an externally applied device designed and fitted to the body to aid rehabilitation, and usually contrasted with a prosthesis, which replaces a missing part, like a foot or leg. Here, it will mean an explanatory software agent associated with a human or machine.