Results


Will Amazon's facial-recognition tech enable mass surveillance?

FOX News

Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos laughs as he talks to the media while touring the new Amazon Spheres during the grand opening at Amazon's Seattle headquarters in Seattle, Washington, U.S., January 29, 2018. Amazon has been selling a facial-recognition system to police, sparking fears that the technology will one day power mass surveillance. On Tuesday, the American Civil Liberties Union and 35 other advocacy group sent a letter to the company's CEO Jeff Bezos, demanding that he stop providing the technology to law enforcement. The technology, called Amazon Rekognition, can identify people's faces in digital images and video. Police in Oregon and Florida have been using the system to help them solve crimes, but the ACLU argues that it's ripe for abuse.


Autonomous vehicle helped locate 'holy grail of shipwrecks' off Colombia

FOX News

San Jose, which was considered the "holy grail of shipwrecks," was located with the help of an underwater autonomous vehicle An autonomous vehicle was used in 2015 to locate a Spanish galleon that sunk 300 years ago off the coast of Colombia with $17 billion in treasure, the research team that helped in the discovery said on Monday. The San Jose, which was considered the "holy grail of shipwrecks," was located with the help of an underwater autonomous vehicle operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The institution said it was holding the discovery under wraps out of respect for the Colombian government. REMUS 6000 being deployed off the Colombian Navy research ship ARC Malpelo. The treasure--which includes of gold, silver and emeralds-- has been the subject of legal battles between several nations as well as private companies.


Wireless 'robofly' looks like an Insect, gets its power from lasers

FOX News

RoboFly is only slightly bigger than a real fly. A new type of flying robot is so tiny and lightweight -- it weighs about as much as a toothpick -- it can perch on your finger. The little flitter is also capable of untethered flight and is powered by lasers. This is a big leap forward in the design of diminutive airborne bots, which are usually too small to support a power source and must trail a lifeline to a distant battery in order to fly, engineers who built the new robot announced in a statement. Their insect-inspired creation is dubbed RoboFly, and like its animal namesake, it sports a pair of delicate, transparent wings that carry it into the air.


Prosthetic arm points California deputies to 3 burglary suspects

FOX News

Investigators in California were pointed in the right direction when a prosthetic arm that was reported stolen last week was spotted in the alleged thieves' car. Investigators in California were pointed in the right direction after a prosthetic arm that was reported stolen last week was spotted in the alleged burglars' car, leading to arrests. An officer with the Grass Valley Police Department on Wednesday came across the suspects -- identified by the Nevada County Sheriff's Office as Michael Martin, Emma St. Claire and Mike Mulligan -- and searched their car. Mike Mulligan, left, Michael Martin and Emma St. Claire were booked at a correction facility in California for suspicion of burglary and possession of stolen property. Law enforcement officials uncovered the prosthetic limb -- which the sheriff's office described in a Facebook post as "the exact arm that was stolen in the burglary."


Google video reveals creepy concept for collecting vast quantities of user data

FOX News

File photo - A Google carpet is seen at the entrance of the new headquarters of Google France before its official inauguration in Paris, France Dec. 6, 2011. A recently surfaced Google video discusses a creepy concept for collecting vast quantities of user data that could span generations. The video, which was obtained by The Verge, paints an unsettling picture of how data could theoretically be harnessed on an epic scale. The Verge reports that the video was produced in 2016 by X, a research and development subsidiary of Google's parent company Alphabet. X, formerly known as Google X, describes itself as a "moonshot factory" focused on developing technologies to make the world "a radically better place."


Niger drone video shows US forces fighting for their lives

FOX News

WASHINGTON – Dramatic new drone video of the Niger ambush that killed four American soldiers shows U.S. forces desperately trying to escape and fighting for their lives after friendly Nigerien forces mistook them for the enemy. It describes how the fleeing troops set up a quick defensive location on the edge of a swamp and -- thinking they were soon to die -- wrote messages home to their loved ones. The video, released by the Pentagon with explanatory narration, includes more than 10 minutes of drone footage, file tape and animation that wasn't made public last week when the military released a portion of the final report on the October attack. The video depicts for the first time the harrowing hours as troops held off their enemy and waited for rescue. There were 46 U.S. and Nigerien troops out on the initial mission in the west African nation, going after but failing to find a high-value militant, then collecting intelligence at a site where the insurgent had been.


US Army starts work on future attack-recon helicopter

FOX News

The Army is now crafting early requirements for what is expected to be a new attack helicopter -- beyond the Apache -- with superior weapons, speed, maneuverability, sensor technology and vastly-improved close-combat attack capability. "We know that in the future we are going to need to have a lethal capability, which drives us to a future attack reconnaissance platform. The Apache is the world's greatest but there will come a time when we look at leap ahead technology," Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville told a small group of reporters. A future attack-reconnaissance helicopter, now in its conceptual phase, is a key part of a wide-spanning, multi-aircraft Army Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program. FVL seeks a family of next-generation aircraft to begin emerging in the 2030s, consisting of attack, utility and heavy-class air assets.


Scientists sucked a memory out of a snail and stuck it in another snail

FOX News

Aplysia californica, also known as the California sea hare Credit: Genny Anderson/CC by 4.0 A new study strongly suggests that at least some memories are stored in genetic code, and that genetic code can act like memory soup. Suck it out of one animal and stick the code in a second animal, and that second animal can remember things that only the first animal knew. That might sound like science fiction or remind some readers of debunked ideas from decades past. But it's serious science: In a new study, researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) extracted RNA, a genetic messenger molecule, from one snail and implanted it in another snail. In both experiments, the recipient -- either the snail or the petri-neurons -- remembered something the donor snail had experienced.


Man claims Wizarding World of Harry Potter ride left him with spinal injuries, sues Universal

FOX News

Tristram Buckley says the benches in the Forbidden Journey ride gave him "shaken adult syndrome." It's safe to say Tristram Buckley wasn't swept up in the magic of the Wizarding World of Harry Potter. Buckley, a former visitor to the Universal Studios Hollywood location of the Potter-themed park, claims in a new lawsuit that one of the rides -- Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey -- left him in pain after causing severe injury to his spine, TMZ reported Monday. According to the suit, Buckley took a seat on the ride's Enchanted Bench, which is suspended from a mechanical arm that moves along a track. The seats also pivot and sway to give riders the sensation of flying through the scenarios presented on a wrap-around screen.


Google employees resign in protest over controversial Pentagon AI project, report says

FOX News

About a dozen Google employees are resigning in protest over the tech giant's involvement in Project Maven, a controversial military program that uses artificial intelligence, Gizmodo reports. Project Maven, which harnesses AI to improve drone targeting, has been a source of concern for a number of Google employees. Last month, over 3,100 Google workers signed a letter to the company's CEO Sundar Pichai asking him to pull the tech giant out of the project. Announced last year, Project Maven is designed to swiftly pull important data from vast quantities of imagery. The tech news website cites an internal Google document containing written accounts from many of the employees that details their decisions to leave.