Results


Google's Waymo expands to Atlanta to test self-driving cars

ZDNet

Google-owned Waymo on Monday announced it will expand its test program of self-driving minivans to Atlanta. Google's self-driving cars involved in 11 crashes Google comes clean on the number of accidents its driverless cars have been in over the past six years. Waymo didn't detail when the rollout in Atlanta will begin or how many vehicles will be used for testing. "Now that we have the world's first fully self-driving vehicles on public roads in AZ, we're looking to take our tech to more cities," Waymo tweeted. According to The Verge, Google began mapping downtown Atlanta last week to have an accurate accurate 3D map for its self-driving fleet.


allai launching insurance AI app store

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Canadian insur-tech startup allai is taking an innovative approach to AI for the Canadian insurance industry. There are 2 types of "friction" we are tackling at allai. First of course is insurance friction and second is AI friction. Many of the existing options on the market are based on an "AI as a Service" model where the customer, policy, claims data must "live" in a provider's cloud or data center. This causes concern with regards to not only privacy and security for the insurance industry but also adds friction over data intellectual property (IP).


'Mind-engaged vehicles will be a disruptive force' and other CES 2018 member comments

ZDNet

Each year in January, tech companies from all over the world gather in Las Vegas to show off their latest and greatest technology from self-driving cars, to robot assistants to the tiniest of TVs. Now that CES 2018 is over, let's take a look at what you thought about the hot (and not so hot) products and trends that will shape the year ahead. Charlie Osborne (Read more) Can autonomous systems which read your thoughts make driving safer as well as more enjoyable? ZDNet member onroda: So, this is not "driverless" technology, at all. Which means that, when the other fully autonomous vehicles hit the road, the mind-engaged vehicles will be a disruptive force, meaning that, it presents a danger to all the others using driveless vehicles.


And the award for most nauseating self-driving car goes to …

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In many ways this year's CES looked a lot more like an autonomous-car show than a consumer electronics show. There were announcements aplenty from the likes of Ford, Baidu, Toyota, and others about self-driving vehicles, upcoming driving tests, and new partners. In a parking lot across from the Las Vegas Convention Center, several companies offered rides; you could even schedule a ride in a self-driving Lyft through the company's app and get dropped off at one of many casinos on the Strip. A couple of miles away in downtown Las Vegas, an eight-passenger autonomous shuttle bus ran in a loop around Fremont Street. It was part of an ongoing test between commuter transit company Keolis, autonomous-car maker Navya, and the city.


More self-driving tech in VW's next-generation Golf

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The world's biggest carmaker Volkswagen said Friday it would stuff even more technology into the next generation of its top-selling Golf model, bringing so-called "connected driving" deeper into the mainstream. Slated for release in 2019, the updated cars will be constantly connected to the internet, with greater self-driving capabilities and "more software than ever before on board," VW compact cars chief Karlheinz Hell said in a statement. Existing Golf models have a range of driver assistance features, including parking aids, staying in lane and maintaining safe distance in traffic jams and emergency braking. But they remain far removed from visions of completely hands-free self-driving cars dangled by industry executives. Some 34 million people have bought a Golf, the successor to the iconic Beetle, since the first model rolled off production lines in 1974, VW says, and the range accounted for almost one in 10 of the vehicles sold by the VW group in 2016.


Ford CEO Jim Hackett on the future of computing, cities, and self-driving cars

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In May 2017, Ford announced that it had replaced its CEO, Mark Fields, who had been with the company since 1989, with Jim Hackett. Despite being on Ford's board since 2013, Hackett was probably best known for leading Steelcase, the large office-furniture company, for decades and turning around its fortunes, as well as for working with the University of Michigan to bring NFL coach Jim Harbaugh to the school. Other than the fact that all these things are based in Michigan, there wasn't really much that pointed to Hackett as the person who would lead the 114-year-old company into the future. But his first few months at the helm have cemented his vision for Ford. Earlier this month he released a treatise doubling down on the company's commitment to autonomous vehicles and the loosely defined concept of "mobility" and the "transport operating system" of the future.


How we already rely on artificial intelligence

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You may not realise it, but we all rely on artificial intelligence (AI) as we go about our normal daily lives. Let's take just one example: Keeping 1.7 billion journeys safeAI is used to protect the UK's rail passengers as they take 1.7 billion journeys (that's more than 66 billion passenger kilometres) every year. But before we even think about taking a train journey, AI is keeping us safe. Thales's Predict and Prevent technology uses a variety of sensors to monitor the real-time performance of more than 42,000 assets on thousands of kilometres of track, and at stations, platforms, signals, bridges, tunnels, crossings, cuttings, embankments and viaducts. That's a huge amount of data.


How machine learning streamlines location data with the Kalman filter - IoT Agenda

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We have spoken about machine learning and the internet of things as tools to optimize location analytics in logistics and supply chain management. It's an accepted fact that technology, especially cloud-based, can benefit companies by optimizing routes and predicting the accurate estimated time of arrivals (ETAs). The direct business value of this optimization lies in the streamlining of various fixed and variable costs associated with logistics. The IoT is imminent – and so are the security challenges it will inevitably bring. Get up to speed on IoT security basics and learn how to devise your own IoT security strategy in our new e-guide.


5 CES 2018 announcements that put Alexa inside cars

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Amazon's Alexa strategy is to be everywhere: ubiquitous, omnipresent, and all-knowing, like some AI god. In pursuit of that goal, the Seattle-based company certainly covered some ground at last week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The extension of the Home Skills API to control microwaves and ovens adds to the more than 800 skills and more than 1,000 devices that Alexa can control in the home today. When it comes to cars, however, Alexa has made fewer inroads. That's why VentureBeat drew up this list of five ways Alexa will enter vehicles in 2018, as revealed at CES. Select Toyota vehicles, like 2018 models of the Camry and Sienna, as well as some Lexus vehicles, will be able to speak with Alexa this year.


The lesser evil (the true paradox)

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An autonomous car approaches a certain speed towards a group of people, so it activates the braking system in order to stop before hitting them, however this system fails and the car continues at the same speed in the direction of the group. What choice should Artificial Intelligence take that controls the car? Dilemmas like the one above have been running through our minds for a while. Isaac Asimov, in several of his stories, published numerous paradoxes of this kind. However, can they really show up?