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5 tech trends set to explode in your life this decade

#artificialintelligence

The average time-frame of tech disruption in our lives has significantly diminished and things are changing at a rapid scale. In a span of few years, gadgets such as MP3 players, compact digital cameras, scanners, CDs, fax machines and several others have more or less disappeared. On the other hand, new-age technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), data analytics, Internet of Things (IoT), content streaming, automation, robotics and 5G have been growing in leaps and bounds to make our lives better. Let's take a look at five tech trends that are expected to explode in the decade that has just begun. Imagine a chip that can perform target computation in 200 seconds, which would otherwise take the world's fastest supercomputer 10,000 years.


Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto

#artificialintelligence

Products/Services Visa agreed to acquire the token and electronic ticketing business of Rambus for $75 million in cash. The business involved is part of the Smart Card Software subsidiary of Rambus. It includes the former Bell ID mobile-payment businesses and the Ecebs smart-ticketing systems for transit providers. Meanwhile, Rambus expanded its CryptoManager Root of Trust product line. "Security is a mission-critical imperative for SoC designs serving virtually every application space," Neeraj Paliwal, vice president of products, cryptography at Rambus, said in a statement.


NOA: The app that wants to read the news to you

The Independent - Tech

NOA doesn't want you to read the news. It wants to read it to you. The Irish company's full name is News Over Audio and it does exactly what that suggests: collects up the best of the world's news and turns it into nuggets of audio, allowing you to catch up on them while listening rather than having to read at a screen. The news you can get is already among the best in the world: it includes the Financial Times and Bloomberg, as well as The Independent. And it is continuing to grow, with other publishers that are among the world's biggest and most important, having announced in recent days that the Economist and the New York Times are arriving, too.



Uber's HR Troubles, Elon's Cave Rescue, and More Car News This Week

WIRED

Every so often, WIRED gets to take a good, long sojourn behind the scenes, to observe what the people we write about are doing all day. This was one of those nice weeks. Editor Alex Davies hopped a plane to Winnemucca, an isolated mining town in northern Nevada that's hosting Alphabet's latest moonshot: its effort to spread the gospel of internet via broadcasting balloons. Senior writer Jessi Hempl got under Uber's hood after the announcement that HR chief Liane Hornsey--the woman brought in to fix the unicorn's culture--resigned for improperly handling allegations of racial discrimination. Contributor Wendy Dent got the scoop on Elon Musk's attempt to build some kind of vehicle that would help the Thai youth soccer team escape a cave complex.


Roborace is building a 300kph AI supercar – no driver required

#artificialintelligence

The Argentinian summer Sun beat down on the Buenos Aires city circuit as the cars approached the penultimate turn. It was February 18, 2017, the Saturday of Formula E's South American weekend, and two cars jostled for first place. The second car, though, was being too aggressive. Nearing the corner's apex, the vehicle misjudged its position and speed. The vehicle slammed into the blue safety walls surrounding the track. As the wreckage crumpled to a stop, a detached wheel rolled freely across the hot asphalt.