Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


On the Mark with Project Dartmouth - Smart Cities Tech

#artificialintelligence

Pangiam, in collaboration with Google Cloud, has announced details of Project DARTMOUTH, an initiative to transform airport security operations by looking for threats concealed within baggage and other shipments at the airport. This technology will be tested within the security facilities of AGS Airport Ltd, owners and operators of Aberdeen, Glasgow, and Southampton Airports in the UK. Project DARTMOUTH is intended to make air travel safer by integrating AI into airport baggage security and screening operations. The technology will in the first instance be focused on rapidly identifying potential threats in baggage, providing increased throughput at security checkpoints, addressing critical friction points in air travel as well as supporting security teams. In later phases the technology will scale to help tackle other pressure points in security and wider airport operations.


Space Needle utilises artificial intelligence to manage visitors

#artificialintelligence

"By understanding how people enjoy the Space Needle's observation decks, food and beverage experiences, and amenities, we can better provide both a safe and enjoyable experience," said Luis Quintero, senior operations manager at the Space Needle. "Through Veovo's crowd management solution, we can reduce and prevent overcrowding, while understanding trends over time will allow us to optimise our operations and resourcing." London Gatwick Airport will use Passenger Predictability solution to optimise security operations and improve passenger flow. The partnership will allow the airport to efficiently handle increasing passenger numbers and build back better for a more sustainable, passenger-centred travel experience. The AI-powered technology gives Gatwick real-time awareness of people's movement and experiences in the North and South terminal security areas.


SynSetExpan: An Iterative Framework for Joint Entity Set Expansion and Synonym Discovery

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Entity set expansion and synonym discovery are two critical NLP tasks. Previous studies accomplish them separately, without exploring their interdependencies. In this work, we hypothesize that these two tasks are tightly coupled because two synonymous entities tend to have similar likelihoods of belonging to various semantic classes. This motivates us to design SynSetExpan, a novel framework that enables two tasks to mutually enhance each other. SynSetExpan uses a synonym discovery model to include popular entities' infrequent synonyms into the set, which boosts the set expansion recall. Meanwhile, the set expansion model, being able to determine whether an entity belongs to a semantic class, can generate pseudo training data to fine-tune the synonym discovery model towards better accuracy. To facilitate the research on studying the interplays of these two tasks, we create the first large-scale Synonym-Enhanced Set Expansion (SE2) dataset via crowdsourcing. Extensive experiments on the SE2 dataset and previous benchmarks demonstrate the effectiveness of SynSetExpan for both entity set expansion and synonym discovery tasks.


Researchers Use AI to Spot Drone Pilots

#artificialintelligence

Law enforcement and military personnel might finally have a way to track malicious drones and prevent millions of dollars in damage thanks to new artificial intelligence research. Academics at Israel's Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have developed a way to locate the operator of a drone by looking at how the airborne vehicle moves. Locating the pilots of malicious drones is a pressing issue. In December 2018, Gatwick Airport had to close its runways to avoid drones flying dangerously close. Officers believed that it was a deliberate attack on the airport.


Researchers Use AI to Spot Drone Pilots

#artificialintelligence

Law enforcement and military personnel might finally have a way to track malicious drones and prevent millions of dollars in damage thanks to new artificial intelligence research. Academics at Israel's Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have developed a way to locate the operator of a drone by looking at how the airborne vehicle moves. Locating the pilots of malicious drones is a pressing issue. In December 2018, Gatwick Airport had to close its runways to avoid drones flying dangerously close. Officers believed that it was a deliberate attack on the airport.


British Airways plans to trial A.I.-powered robots at Heathrow Airport

#artificialintelligence

British Airways is set to trial artificial intelligence powered robots at Heathrow Terminal 5. In an announcement Thursday, the airline said the autonomous robots had been programmed to "interact with passengers" in multiple languages and would be able to answer "thousands" of questions, providing passengers with services such as real-time flight information. The robots are being provided by a technology company called BotsAndUs and the trial will start in 2020. British Airways added that the robots would also have the capacity to escort passengers to locations such as special assistance zones. "These smart robots are the latest innovation allowing us to free up our people to deal with immediate issues and offer that one-on-one service we know our customers appreciate," Ricardo Vidal, who is head of innovation at British Airways, said in a statement.


British Airways installs artificial intelligence software at Heathrow

#artificialintelligence

British Airways has introduced advanced neural networks, known as artificial intelligence, to its airside operation at Heathrow Terminal 5. The new system is designed to help staff ensure every flight departs safely and on time. Currently, when customers disembark an aircraft, British Airways' ground staff manually check and record the details of eighteen different activities that need to be completed before the plane can depart for its next flight - including thorough cleaning of the aircraft interiors, unloading and reloading of catering, luggage and cargo and refuelling. An issue affecting just one of these tasks has the potential to disrupt the entire process and delay the flight's departure. Now, using a network of cameras set up around the aircraft stand by technology start-up Assaia, an alumni of British Airways' parent company IAG's Hangar 51 start-up accelerator programme, artificial intelligence is employed to compare live footage of the complex turnaround process with the proposed schedule.


British Airways trials A.I. at London's Heathrow Airport to reduce delays

#artificialintelligence

British Airways (BA) has introduced artificial intelligence (AI) technology to parts of its "airside operation" at Heathrow Airport. In an announcement Monday, the airline said that AI would be used to tackle challenges faced when an aircraft is being prepared for departure after passengers from its previous flight have disembarked. It's during this time that staff on the ground undertake manual checks related to 18 different things, making records of what they are doing, British Airways said. These checks have to be done before the plane takes to the air again and are, among other things, related to refueling, the unloading and reloading of luggage, and cleaning of the aircraft's inside. BA said that if one of these tasks encounters an issue, it could potentially disrupt the whole process, resulting in a delayed departure.


Six Ways Airports Are Improving Safety

#artificialintelligence

The aviation industry takes airport safety and security very seriously. But this mindset can lead to excessive wait times and significant frustration for travelers. Fortunately, there are many changes in the works, as technology advances aim to make the airport experience smoother and faster. Here are six ways airports are improving their safety measures while becoming easier to use. One safety measure going through the trial stage is a very powerful walk-though passenger scanner that can recognize potential hidden threats without passengers needing to stay still or remove items of clothing.


Airports begin to fight back against rogue drones with anti-incursion systems

FOX News

An estimated 7 million drones will be flying in the skies by 2020; Claudia Cowan reports on the new technology being developed to keep airports safe. But some people either don't care or use drones to intentionally disrupt airport operations. Last December, drone sightings at London's Gatwick Airport forced a three-day shutdown, and canceled flights left thousands of stranded passengers scrambling. No one has been arrested in the case, and this past April, investigators said it could have been an inside job. In recent months, suspected or confirmed drone activity has grounded flights in Dubai, New Zealand, Israel, and at Newark Airport in New Jersey.