Results


Challenges of Artificial Intelligence -- From Machine Learning and Computer Vision to Emotional Intelligence

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) has become a part of everyday conversation and our lives. It is considered as the new electricity that is revolutionizing the world. AI is heavily invested in both industry and academy. However, there is also a lot of hype in the current AI debate. AI based on so-called deep learning has achieved impressive results in many problems, but its limits are already visible. AI has been under research since the 1940s, and the industry has seen many ups and downs due to over-expectations and related disappointments that have followed. The purpose of this book is to give a realistic picture of AI, its history, its potential and limitations. We believe that AI is a helper, not a ruler of humans. We begin by describing what AI is and how it has evolved over the decades. After fundamentals, we explain the importance of massive data for the current mainstream of artificial intelligence. The most common representations for AI, methods, and machine learning are covered. In addition, the main application areas are introduced. Computer vision has been central to the development of AI. The book provides a general introduction to computer vision, and includes an exposure to the results and applications of our own research. Emotions are central to human intelligence, but little use has been made in AI. We present the basics of emotional intelligence and our own research on the topic. We discuss super-intelligence that transcends human understanding, explaining why such achievement seems impossible on the basis of present knowledge,and how AI could be improved. Finally, a summary is made of the current state of AI and what to do in the future. In the appendix, we look at the development of AI education, especially from the perspective of contents at our own university.


The best films of 2021

Mashable

This year flooded theaters and streaming sites with a wealth of riches. Audiences hungry for escape were rewarded with adventures that boasted evil AI, high fantasy, and sprawling superhero showdowns. Those craving the cerebral were gifted art house films with a perturbed princess, an unnerving nurse, and a serial killer who took her love of muscle cars to a wild extreme. It was a year where musicals sang of the best and worst of New York City, where dramas made infectiously thrilling turns and comedies took culotte-coated leaps that had us in stitches. Here are our picks for the 15 best films of 2021.


DIGITAL EYE: Weekly Roundup of Best Digital News #13

#artificialintelligence

Welcome to your new weekly Briefing from The Digital Eye. This has been compiled for busy professionals who have limited time but want to stay up to date with the latest digital news. We hope you have found these articles informative. Would you please share with others who might also be interested? TuSimple aims to test self-driving trucks on public roads without human safety operator by end of the year.


The Role of Social Movements, Coalitions, and Workers in Resisting Harmful Artificial Intelligence and Contributing to the Development of Responsible AI

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

There is mounting public concern over the influence that AI based systems has in our society. Coalitions in all sectors are acting worldwide to resist hamful applications of AI. From indigenous people addressing the lack of reliable data, to smart city stakeholders, to students protesting the academic relationships with sex trafficker and MIT donor Jeffery Epstein, the questionable ethics and values of those heavily investing in and profiting from AI are under global scrutiny. There are biased, wrongful, and disturbing assumptions embedded in AI algorithms that could get locked in without intervention. Our best human judgment is needed to contain AI's harmful impact. Perhaps one of the greatest contributions of AI will be to make us ultimately understand how important human wisdom truly is in life on earth.


The Morning After: Netflix explains how it uses AI to sell shows

Engadget

Without revealing all its secrets, Netflix has laid out how it uses AI to market shows and predict their success. We already knew that Netflix shuffles and redesigns its interface and show tiles, apparently on the fly, to hook more viewers. But it also uses AI to compare new shows to those its country-by-country viewership watched in the past and to tap into metadata and information on non-Netflix shows, too. The explanation is a little (well, very) dry, but the AI goes beyond Netflix's own data to hedge the company's bets, for less risk, more profit. If, for example, a drama is likely to fare well in Spain, Netflix could increase marketing in the region and prep dubs and subtitles earlier than usual.


'Knight Rider' returning to big screen, but what car will play KITT?

FOX News

Fox News Flash top entertainment and celebrity headlines are here. Check out what's clicking today in entertainment. "Furious 7" director James Wan is gearing up another car-centric property, a new report says. The Wrap reports that Wan is working on a new version of the classic TV series "Knight Rider." The original show ran from 1982 to 1986 on NBC.


GPT-3 Creative Fiction

#artificialintelligence

What if I told a story here, how would that story start?" Thus, the summarization prompt: "My second grader asked me what this passage means: …" When a given prompt isn't working and GPT-3 keeps pivoting into other modes of completion, that may mean that one hasn't constrained it enough by imitating a correct output, and one needs to go further; writing the first few words or sentence of the target output may be necessary.


Alphabet's Next Billion-Dollar Business: 10 Industries To Watch - CB Insights Research

#artificialintelligence

Alphabet is using its dominance in the search and advertising spaces -- and its massive size -- to find its next billion-dollar business. From healthcare to smart cities to banking, here are 10 industries the tech giant is targeting. With growing threats from its big tech peers Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon, Alphabet's drive to disrupt has become more urgent than ever before. The conglomerate is leveraging the power of its first moats -- search and advertising -- and its massive scale to find its next billion-dollar businesses. To protect its current profits and grow more broadly, Alphabet is edging its way into industries adjacent to the ones where it has already found success and entering new spaces entirely to find opportunities for disruption. Evidence of Alphabet's efforts is showing up in several major industries. For example, the company is using artificial intelligence to understand the causes of diseases like diabetes and cancer and how to treat them. Those learnings feed into community health projects that serve the public, and also help Alphabet's effort to build smart cities. Elsewhere, Alphabet is using its scale to build a better virtual assistant and own the consumer electronics software layer. It's also leveraging that scale to build a new kind of Google Pay-operated checking account. In this report, we examine how Alphabet and its subsidiaries are currently working to disrupt 10 major industries -- from electronics to healthcare to transportation to banking -- and what else might be on the horizon. Within the world of consumer electronics, Alphabet has already found dominance with one product: Android. Mobile operating system market share globally is controlled by the Linux-based OS that Google acquired in 2005 to fend off Microsoft and Windows Mobile. Today, however, Alphabet's consumer electronics strategy is being driven by its work in artificial intelligence. Google is building some of its own hardware under the Made by Google line -- including the Pixel smartphone, the Chromebook, and the Google Home -- but the company is doing more important work on hardware-agnostic software products like Google Assistant (which is even available on iOS).


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

#artificialintelligence

The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.


The 100 most popular things everyone bought this year

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Here's everything our readers were most obsessed with in 2019. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission. As we head into the new year, we think it's fun to look at all the wonderful products that we bought in 2019. This year brought some incredible releases like Disney, Apple AirPods Pro, and the all-new Kindle--and honestly, some of these things were apart of what really make the year great. So we decided to roundup 100 of the most popular products that people bought over and over again. Whether it was a massive sale (looking at you Black Friday) or one of the hottest product people couldn't stop talking about (*cough* weighted blankets *cough*), our readers found something that caught their eyes. From robot vacuums to wireless headphones to streaming services, these are the most popular products that people couldn't stop buying in 2019. Everyone become obsessed with Disney in 2019. Although it was just released in November, the new streaming service Disney became the most popular product of the year. With it came nostalgia for the Disney classics, new original shows and movies, and plenty of Baby Yoda content. Seriously, if you're a fan of Marvel, Disney Princesses, Star Wars, Pixar, and all things Disney, you might want to consider following suit and getting a subscription for yourself. We still love the tried-and-true Instant Pot Duo. It's no surprise here--our readers were all about that Instant Pot life this year. The Duo 6 Quart, a.k.a. the most popular model out there, was far and away the biggest seller this year, and in no small part because of the deals that ran on it during Prime Day and Black Friday, respectively. If you were one of the lucky ducks who nabbed it when it was just $50, good on you. But you can still get it for a pretty good price right now, too. Nobody really wants to vacuum, but they also don't want to spend a fortune on a robot vacuum to do their dirty work. That's why the Eufy 11S was so popular this year. It's the best affordable robot vacuum we've ever tested because it balances great cleaning powering and a reasonable price. Our readers loved scooping it up--especially when it was on sale as it is right now.