Media


A Documentary Swipes Left On Dating Apps

NPR

In the documentary Swiped, filmmaker Nancy Jo Sales investigates how dating apps have created unintended consequences in actual relationships. In the documentary Swiped, filmmaker Nancy Jo Sales investigates how dating apps have created unintended consequences in actual relationships. For some of the 40 million or so Americans who currently use online dating apps like Tinder, Bumble and Hinge, the findings of the new HBO documentary Swiped might be intuitively obvious. But for others, there may still be revelations aplenty in the film, which is subtitled Hooking Up in the Digital Age. It's about how these apps may change how we think about relationships -- and it doesn't paint a positive picture.


Artificial Intelligence. Real News?

NPR

Close your eyes and try to picture a journalist. Well, what if all of that was replaced … by robots? Okay, our show isn't about to be hosted by a machine (yet). But artificial intelligence is already being used in newsrooms today. For instance, there's Heliograf, a bot developed by The Washington Post.


Spotify Is, For Now, The World's Most Valuable Music Company

NPR

The Spotify banner hangs from the New York Stock Exchange on the morning that the music streaming service begins trading shares, on April 3, 2018 in New York City. The question now is: Where to? The Spotify banner hangs from the New York Stock Exchange on the morning that the music streaming service begins trading shares, on April 3, 2018 in New York City. The question now is: Where to? Following its successful public listing yesterday, the music streaming service Spotify is now worth around $25 billion, making it the largest music company in the world -- but when Spotify first débuted, back in 2008, it was reasonable to think it would fail.


Star 'Treknology': Imagining The Future Into Being

NPR

Sonequa Martin-Green, center, a cast member in "Star Trek: Discovery," poses with original "Star Trek" cast members Nichelle Nichols, left, and William Shatner at the premiere of the new television series on Sept. 19 in Los Angeles.


Skip To 'The Good Part' Of Romance Audiobooks

NPR

Getting to the steamy stuff – you know what we're talking about – just got a little easier. Audible recently launched a feature for some romance audiobooks that lets listeners skip to "the good part." The Amazon company launched the Audible Romance Package, which allows users to "binge to your heart's content" thousands of audiobooks included. Because parsing through the masses can be daunting, there are a few ways to narrow the search, including recommendations from the "Take Me to the Good Part" tool. It offers listeners the option to jump to certain places in select audiobooks based on 10 categories.


Skip To 'The Good Part' Of Romance Audiobooks

NPR

Getting to the steamy stuff – you know what we're talking about – just got a little easier. Audible recently launched a feature for some romance audiobooks that lets listeners skip to "the good part." The Amazon company launched the Audible Romance Package, which allows users to "binge to your heart's content" thousands of audiobooks included. Because parsing through the masses can be daunting, there are a few ways to narrow the search, including recommendations from the "Take Me to the Good Part" tool. It offers listeners the option to jump to certain places in select audiobooks based on 10 categories.


Lawmakers: Don't Gauge Artificial Intelligence By What You See In The Movies

NPR

A full-scale figure of a "T-800" terminator robot used in the movie Terminator 2, is displayed at a preview of the Terminator Exhibition in Tokyo in 2009. A full-scale figure of a "T-800" terminator robot used in the movie Terminator 2, is displayed at a preview of the Terminator Exhibition in Tokyo in 2009. Artificial intelligence is the subject of great hopes, dire warnings, and now -- a congressional caucus. Alarms about AI have been raised in apocalyptic movies and by some of the most pioneering minds in science and technology. Elon Musk, the Tesla and SpaceX CEO, said in July that AI is a "fundamental existential risk for human civilization."


Why Don't We Have Princess Leia Holograms Yet?

NPR

It's one of the most iconic scenes in all of science fiction: In the original Star Wars, the droid R2-D2 projects a 3-D image onto a tabletop. Princess Leia, projected as a tiny hologram, desperately asks the semi-retired Jedi master Ben Kenobi for assistance: "Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi. Still brings the chills, doesn't it? The free-standing 3-D hologram has been a staple of science fiction for decades. But like the phaser and the flying car, it's one of those sci-fi dreams that has yet to become reality.


Computer Scientists Demonstrate The Potential For Faking Video

NPR

An update from the Wild Wild West of fake news technologies: A team of computer scientists have figured out how to make words come out of the mouth of former President Barack Obama -- on video -- by using artificial intelligence. If you've been on the Internet at any point in the last year, there's a good chance you've come across fake news articles. Well, soon enough we may see a wellspring of fake news videos. As a team out of the University of Washington explains in a new paper entitled "Synthesizing Obama: Learning Lip Sync from Audio," they've made several fake videos of President Obama. Take for example, a time that he discussed the Pulse nightclub shooter and said "the investigation is ongoing, but we know that the killer was an angry and disturbed individual who took in extremist information and propaganda over the Internet."


To Test Your Fake News Judgment, Play This Game

NPR

Fake news has been on Maggie Farley's mind further back than 2016 when President Trump brought the term into the vernacular. Farley, a veteran journalist, says we've had fake news forever and that "people have always been trying to manipulate information for their own ends," but she calls what we're seeing now "Fake news with a capital F." In other words, extreme in its ambition for financial gain or political power. "Before, the biggest concern was, 'Are people being confused by opinion; are people being tricked by spin?' " Now, Farley says, the stakes are much higher. So one day she says an idea came to her: build a game to test users' ability to detect fake news from real. The game's interface mimics the dating app Tinder, which made swiping famous.