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MeltpoolNet: Melt pool Characteristic Prediction in Metal Additive Manufacturing Using Machine Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Characterizing meltpool shape and geometry is essential in metal Additive Manufacturing (MAM) to control the printing process and avoid defects. Predicting meltpool flaws based on process parameters and powder material is difficult due to the complex nature of MAM process. Machine learning (ML) techniques can be useful in connecting process parameters to the type of flaws in the meltpool. In this work, we introduced a comprehensive framework for benchmarking ML for melt pool characterization. An extensive experimental dataset has been collected from more than 80 MAM articles containing MAM processing conditions, materials, meltpool dimensions, meltpool modes and flaw types. We introduced physics-aware MAM featurization, versatile ML models, and evaluation metrics to create a comprehensive learning framework for meltpool defect and geometry prediction. This benchmark can serve as a basis for melt pool control and process optimization. In addition, data-driven explicit models have been identified to estimate meltpool geometry from process parameters and material properties which outperform Rosenthal estimation for meltpool geometry while maintaining interpretability.


MIT accelerates the discovery of new 3D printing materials with open-source AI platform

#artificialintelligence

A partnership between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the chemical giant BASF has managed to successfully create an AI-driven process to speed up the discovery of custom 3D printing materials. Chemists usually develop a few iterations of a material candidate over a couple of days and test them in the lab. The new machine-learning algorithm can churn out hundreds of those iterations with the desired characteristics in the same timeframe. This would save time and raw material costs, as well as lessen the environmental impact of the discarded chemicals. Not only that, but the algorithm may also come up with ideas that the material's engineer could have overlooked for various reasons.


MIT Uses AI To Accelerate the Discovery of New Materials for 3D Printing

#artificialintelligence

Researchers at MIT and BASF have developed a data-driven system that accelerates the process of discovering new 3D printing materials that have multiple mechanical properties. A new machine-learning system costs less, generates less waste, and can be more innovative than manual discovery methods. The growing popularity of 3D printing for manufacturing all sorts of items, from customized medical devices to affordable homes, has created more demand for new 3D printing materials designed for very specific uses. To cut down on the time it takes to discover these new materials, researchers at MIT have developed a data-driven process that uses machine learning to optimize new 3D printing materials with multiple characteristics, like toughness and compression strength. By streamlining materials development, the system lowers costs and lessens the environmental impact by reducing the amount of chemical waste.


Data Mining and Machine Learning: Fundamental Concepts and Algorithms: The Free eBook - KDnuggets

#artificialintelligence

We are pleased to announce the second edition of our book Data Mining and Machine Learning: Fundamental Concepts and Algorithms, Second Edition, by Mohammed J. Zaki and Wagner Meira, Jr., published by Cambridge University Press, 2020. The entire book is available to read online for free and the site includes video lectures and other resources. New to this edition is an entire part devoted to regression and deep learning. The fundamental algorithms in data mining and machine learning form the basis of data science, utilizing automated methods to analyze patterns and models for all kinds of data in applications ranging from scientific discovery to business analytics. This textbook for senior undergraduate and graduate courses provides a comprehensive, in-depth overview of data mining, machine learning and statistics, offering solid guidance for students, researchers, and practitioners.


Reverse engineering of 3-D-printed parts by machine learning reveals security vulnerabilities

#artificialintelligence

Over the past 30 years, the use of glass and carbon-fiber reinforced composites in aerospace and other high-performance applications has soared along with the broad industrial adoption of composite materials. Key to the strength and versatility of these hybrid, layered materials in high-performance applications is the orientation of fibers in each layer. Recent innovations in additive manufacturing (3-D printing) have made it possible to finetune this factor, thanks to the ability to include within the CAD file discrete printer-head orientation instructions for each layer of the component being printed, thereby optimizing strength, flexibility, and durability for specific uses of the part. These 3-D-printing toolpaths (a series of coordinated locations a tool will follow) in CAD file instructions are therefore a valuable trade secret for the manufacturers. However, a team of researchers from NYU Tandon School of Engineering led by Nikhil Gupta, a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering showed that these toolpaths are also easy to reproduce--and therefore steal--with machine learning (ML) tools applied to the microstructures of the part obtained by a CT scan.


Your Ultimate Data Mining & Machine Learning Cheat Sheet

#artificialintelligence

Dimensionality reduction is the process of expressing high-dimensional data in a reduced number of dimensions such that each one contains the most amount of information. Dimensionality reduction may be used for visualization of high-dimensional data or to speed up machine learning models by removing low-information or correlated features. Principal Component Analysis, or PCA, is a popular method of reducing the dimensionality of data by drawing several orthogonal (perpendicular) vectors in the feature space to represent the reduced number of dimensions. The variable number represents the number of dimensions the reduced data will have. In the case of visualization, for example, it would be two dimensions.


A real-time iterative machine learning approach for temperature profile prediction in additive manufacturing processes

arXiv.org Machine Learning

--Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a manufacturing paradigm that builds three-dimensional objects from a computer-aided design model by successively adding material layer by layer . AM has become very popular in the past decade due to its utility for fast prototyping such as 3D printing as well as manufacturing functional parts with complex geometries using processes such as laser metal deposition that would be difficult to create using traditional machining. As the process for creating an intricate part for an expensive metal such as Titanium is prohibitive with respect to cost, computational models are used to simulate the behavior of AM processes before the experimental run. However, as the simulations are computationally costly and time-consuming for predicting multiscale multi-physics phenomena in AM, physics-informed data-driven machine-learning systems for predicting the behavior of AM processes are immensely beneficial. Such models accelerate not only multiscale simulation tools but also empower real-time control systems using in-situ data. In this paper, we design and develop essential components of a scientific framework for developing a data-driven model-based real-time control system. Finite element methods are employed for solving time-dependent heat equations and developing the database. The proposed framework uses extremely randomized trees - an ensemble of bagged decision trees as the regression algorithm iteratively using temperatures of prior voxels and laser information as inputs to predict temperatures of subsequent voxels. The models achieve mean absolute percentage errors below 1% for predicting temperature profiles for AM processes. Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a modern manufacturing approach in which digital 3D design data is used to build parts by sequentially depositing layers of materials [1]. AM techniques are becoming very popular compared to traditional approaches because of their success in building complicated designs, fast prototyping, and low-volume or one-of-a-kind productions across many industries. Direct Metal Deposition (DMD) [2] is an AM technology where various materials such as steel or Titanium are used to develop the finished product.


Network Based Pricing for 3D Printing Services in Two-Sided Manufacturing-as-a-Service Marketplace

arXiv.org Machine Learning

This paper presents approaches to determine a network based pricing for 3D printing services in the context of a two-sided manufacturing-as-a-service marketplace. The intent is to provide cost analytics to enable service bureaus to better compete in the market by moving away from setting ad-hoc and subjective prices. A data mining approach with machine learning methods is used to estimate a price range based on the profile characteristics of 3D printing service suppliers. The model considers factors such as supplier experience, supplier capabilities, customer reviews and ratings from past orders, and scale of operations among others to estimate a price range for suppliers' services. Data was gathered from existing marketplace websites, which was then used to train and test the model. The model demonstrates an accuracy of 65% for US based suppliers and 59% for Europe based suppliers to classify a supplier's 3D Printer listing in one of the seven price categories. The improvement over baseline accuracy of 25% demonstrates that machine learning based methods are promising for network based pricing in manufacturing marketplaces. Conventional methodologies for pricing services through activity based costing are inefficient in strategically pricing 3D printing service offering in a connected marketplace. As opposed to arbitrarily determining prices, this work proposes an approach to determine prices through data mining methods to estimate competitive prices. Such tools can be built into online marketplaces to help independent service bureaus to determine service price rates.


Data Mining vs. Machine Learning: What's The Difference? - Import.io

@machinelearnbot

Data mining isn't a new invention that came with the digital age. The concept has been around for over a century, but came into greater public focus in the 1930s. According to Hacker Bits, one of the first modern moments of data mining occurred in 1936, when Alan Turing introduced the idea of a universal machine that could perform computations similar to those of modern-day computers. Forbes also reported on Turing's development of the "Turing Test" in 1950 to determine if a computer has real intelligence or not. To pass his test, a computer needed to fool a human into believing it was also human.


Data Mining vs. Machine Learning: What's The Difference? - Import.io

@machinelearnbot

Data mining isn't a new invention that came with the digital age. The concept has been around for over a century, but came into greater public focus in the 1930s. According to Hacker Bits, one of the first modern moments of data mining occurred in 1936, when Alan Turing introduced the idea of a universal machine that could perform computations similar to those of modern-day computers. Forbes also reported on Turing's development of the "Turing Test" in 1950 to determine if a computer has real intelligence or not. To pass his test, a computer needed to fool a human into believing it was also human.