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Matching wits: Humans and AI

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We began to speak and we learnt to express. We began to get curious, and we uncovered the mysteries of the universe. We climbed the food chain, we proclaimed our superiority. But some thirsts are insatiable. To match our own intelligence and surpass the pace, we crafted Artificial Intelligence. From self-driving cars to smart voice assistants, face recognition to endless Newsfeed at Facebook, AI defeating former Go champion Lee Se-dol to Netflix movie recommendations; we have awed in the possibilities of AI.


The Morning After: LG might get out of the smartphone business

Engadget

In the US, today is Inauguration Day, and as Joe Biden prepares to take the oath as our 46th president, it's worth taking a look back at the discussions four years ago. Back then, the "most tech-savvy" president exited as all eyes turned to Donald Trump trading in his Android Twitter machine for a secure device. We know how things went after that. Donald Trump isn't tweeting anymore (at least not from his main accounts), and the country is struggling through a pandemic. The outgoing president just saw his temporary YouTube ban extended and, in one of his last official acts, pardoned Anthony Levandowski for stealing self-driving car secrets from Google's subsidiary Waymo.


25 technologies that have changed the world

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You may even be using one to read this article. Wi-Fi has become essential to our personal and professional lives. The smartphone and the internet we use today wouldn't have been possible without wireless communication technologies such as Wi-Fi. In 1995 if you wanted to "surf" the internet at home, you had to chain yourself to a network cable like it was an extension cord. In 1997, Wi-Fi was invented and released for consumer use.


Alphabet's Next Billion-Dollar Business: 10 Industries To Watch - CB Insights Research

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Alphabet is using its dominance in the search and advertising spaces -- and its massive size -- to find its next billion-dollar business. From healthcare to smart cities to banking, here are 10 industries the tech giant is targeting. With growing threats from its big tech peers Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon, Alphabet's drive to disrupt has become more urgent than ever before. The conglomerate is leveraging the power of its first moats -- search and advertising -- and its massive scale to find its next billion-dollar businesses. To protect its current profits and grow more broadly, Alphabet is edging its way into industries adjacent to the ones where it has already found success and entering new spaces entirely to find opportunities for disruption. Evidence of Alphabet's efforts is showing up in several major industries. For example, the company is using artificial intelligence to understand the causes of diseases like diabetes and cancer and how to treat them. Those learnings feed into community health projects that serve the public, and also help Alphabet's effort to build smart cities. Elsewhere, Alphabet is using its scale to build a better virtual assistant and own the consumer electronics software layer. It's also leveraging that scale to build a new kind of Google Pay-operated checking account. In this report, we examine how Alphabet and its subsidiaries are currently working to disrupt 10 major industries -- from electronics to healthcare to transportation to banking -- and what else might be on the horizon. Within the world of consumer electronics, Alphabet has already found dominance with one product: Android. Mobile operating system market share globally is controlled by the Linux-based OS that Google acquired in 2005 to fend off Microsoft and Windows Mobile. Today, however, Alphabet's consumer electronics strategy is being driven by its work in artificial intelligence. Google is building some of its own hardware under the Made by Google line -- including the Pixel smartphone, the Chromebook, and the Google Home -- but the company is doing more important work on hardware-agnostic software products like Google Assistant (which is even available on iOS).


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

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The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.


10 most important tech trends of the decade

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Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveils the iPad on January 27, 2010, in San Francisco. When I hustled out of CNET headquarters in San Francisco on May 26, 2010, and slipped into a rental car with two of my co-workers to head to a meeting across the Bay, one of them slipped me a copy of The Wall Street Journal and pointed to a headline that announced Apple had passed Microsoft to become the world's most valuable tech company. "What do you think of that?" she said. "Unreal," I responded, shaking my head. Just over a decade earlier, Apple had nearly been on its deathbed and needed a $150 million investment from Microsoft simply to stay alive.


Tesla's latest software introduces new 'Car-aoke' function and connects to Netflix

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Tesla's latest software update has a'Car-aoke' function and lets you stream your favorite shows and movies directly to the vehicle's display. Users can access Netflix, Hulu, YouTube Spotify and the new feature'Car-aoke' that lets them host a karaoke show to stay occupied on long trips. Software Version 10.0 also lets users summon their car - as long as they can see it. Software Version 10.0 – our biggest software update ever,' Tesla shared in an announcement. 'We're raising the bar for what people have come to expect from their cars with new entertainment, gaming, music, and convenience features designed to make your car much more capable, as well as making time spent in your car more fun.'



Netflix pulls Apple AirPlay streaming in shock move that stops people casting TV shows from their iPhone

The Independent - Tech

Netflix has stopped its users from sending videos to their Apple TVs from their phones. The shock decision removes one of the key features both from the Netflix apps and iPhones they are used on. Until now, it has been possible to send a Netflix video onto a TV using Apple's AirPlay, which allows people to cast the video from their phone to the TV. AirPlay is used mostly on Apple TVs at the moment, though Apple is in the process of rolling out the technology to other smart televisions. We'll tell you what's true.


Virgin Media down: TV service stops working for users across UK

The Independent - Tech

Virgin Media's TV services have stopped working, briefly leaving people service on their television. The company's services are down across the UK, according to the tracking website Down Detector. Users reported problems with both its mobile service for phones as well as its cable service for homes, though Virgin said the only problems were with its televisions services. TV services also stopped working, with affected users seeing a "V53" error. We'll tell you what's true.