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AI Weekly: What ML practitioners are doing about climate change

#artificialintelligence

A lot happened this week in the AI space. The Guardian wrote an article with GPT-3 and again demonstrated that no matter what OpenAI paid to train and create the language model, the free marketing might be worth more. After losing the JEDI cloud contract appeal with the Pentagon, Amazon appointed to its board Keith Alexander, who oversaw the National Security Agency mass surveillance revealed by Edward Snowden leaks in 2013. And Portland passed the strictest facial recognition bans in U.S. history, outlawing government and business use of the technology. However, AI Weekly attempts to reach into the zeitgeist and highlight the issues on people's minds. This week without question it's the smoke that has hung over the western United States and the underlying problem of climate change.


AI Weekly: What ML practitioners are doing about climate change

#artificialintelligence

A lot happened this week deserving of attention in the AI space. The Guardian wrote an article with GPT-3 and again demonstrated that no matter what OpenAI paid to train and create the language model, the free marketing might be worth more. After losing the JEDI cloud contract appeal with the Pentagon, Amazon appointed Keith Alexander to its board -- the man who oversaw the National Security Agency mass surveillance revealed by Edward Snowden leaks in 2013. And Portland passed the strictest facial recognition bans in U.S. history, outlawing government and business use of the technology. However, AI Weekly attempts to reach into the zeitgeist and highlight important events on people's minds. This week without question it's the smoke that's hung over the western United States and the underlying issue of climate change.


How Artificial Intelligence Could Help Fight Climate Change-Driven Wildfires and Save Lives

#artificialintelligence

On a tower in the Brazilian rain forest, a sentinel scans the horizon for the first signs of fire. They don't blink or take breaks, and guided by artificial intelligence they can tell the difference between a dust cloud, an insect swarm and a plume of smoke that demands quick attention. In Brazil, the devices help keep mining giant Vale SA working, and protect trees for pulp and paper producer Suzano SA. In the future, it's a system that may be put to work in California, where deadly wildfires abound. The equipment includes optical and thermal cameras, as well as spectrometric systems that identify the chemical makeup of substances.


She Spoke out About Climate Change--and They Tried to Make Her Pay for It

Mother Jones

This story was originally published by Grist and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. In 2015, a University of California, Davis researcher named Sarah Moffit appeared in a four-and-a-half-minute video detailing her work studying ancient ocean ecosystems. Looking young and serious, with a long ash-blonde mane falling around a scarf that wouldn't be out of place on a Nancy Meyers protagonist, she explained the methods she used to make a new and significant discovery. First, she had sliced up cores of sediment from the ocean floor "like a cake." Then she'd used a microscope to examine high-resolution photos of the microorganisms scattered throughout those samples. Moffit's analysis indicated that when an ocean ecosystem had suffered an ecological shock--such as relatively sudden shifts in oxygen levels or temperature--it had taken 10 times longer to recover than was previously believed, millennia as opposed to centuries. In other words: Climate change's impact on marine life could be much more drastic than we thought.