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Google to open artificial intelligence centre in China

#artificialintelligence

Google is deepening its push into artificial intelligence (AI) by opening a research centre in China, even though its search services remain blocked in the country. Google said the facility would be the first its kind in Asia and would aim to employ local talent. Silicon Valley is focusing heavily on the future applications for AI. China has also indicated strong support for AI development and for catching up with the US. Research into artificial intelligence has the potential to improve a range of technologies, from self-driving cars and automated factories to translation products and facial recognition software.


L.A. Fire Department used drones for the first time during Skirball fire

Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Fire Department dispatched drones for the first time while battling a wildfire this month as firefighters took on the Skirball fire in Bel-Air. Fire officials demonstrated the use of the unmanned aerial vehicles for reporters on Thursday, sending two drones buzzing near blackened hills around Linda Flora Drive. "They provide real-time situational awareness from a bird's-eye perspective to the incident commander so they can see what's going on at their emergency and then change their tactics accordingly to mitigate the hazards," said Capt. Firefighters used two DJI Matrice 100 drones during the Skirball fire, Scott said. One had a high-definition camera used to survey the burn area, and the other had an infrared camera to assess hot spots.


Google to open AI research centre in China

#artificialintelligence

Google is deepening its push into artificial intelligence (AI) by opening a research centre in China, even though its search services remain blocked in the country. Google said the facility would be the first its kind in Asia and would aim to employ local talent. Silicon Valley is focusing heavily on the future applications for AI. China has also indicated strong support for AI development and for catching up with the US. Research into artificial intelligence has the potential to improve a range of technologies, from self-driving cars and automated factories to translation products and facial recognition software.


Why You Really, Really Care About Robots Getting 'Human' Rights

#artificialintelligence

In Estonia, where the digital state was invented, the government is hard at work on the legal status of robots. The question is: do artificial intelligences deserve "human" rights? This may seem like a particularly lame way for EU bureaucrats to kill some time and spend taxpayer cash, slightly ahead of counting angels on pins, and just behind dictating rules around who can make cheese, or what wines qualify as "Burgundy." But it's actually something that matters. Because in a time when AI is advancing and commerce will move largely to AI-driven voice-powered systems, you will soon be in command of intelligent systems.


Dragonfly Eye: Artificial Intelligence Machine Can Identify 2 Billion People in Seconds

#artificialintelligence

Yitu Technology, based in Shanghai, China has developed and employed an artificial intelligence (A.I.) algorithm called Dragonfly Eye that uses facial recognition technology capable of identifying 2 billion people in seconds. Zhu Long, CEO of Yitu Technologies, told the South China Morning Post, "Our machines can very easily recognise you among at least 2 billion people in a matter of seconds, which would have been unbelievable just three years ago." Dragonfly Eye is presently used by 150 municipal public security systems and 20 provincial public security departments across the country of China. Dragonfly Eye was initially employed on the Shanghai Metro in Shanghai, China, during January of this year. Local police authorities credit Dragonfly Eye with aiding in the arrest of 576 suspects on the Shanghai Metro in the first three months of using the facial recognition system.


New York City moves to establish algorithm-monitoring task force

#artificialintelligence

New York City may soon gain a task force dedicated to monitoring the fairness of algorithms used by municipal agencies. Formed from experts in automated systems and representatives of groups affected by those systems, it would be responsible for closely examining algorithms in use by the city and making recommendations on how to improve accountability and avoid bias. The bill, which doesn't have a fancy name, has been approved by the city council and is on the Mayor's desk for signing. The New York division of the ACLU has argued in favor of it. Say, for instance, an "automated decision system" (as the law calls them) determines to a certain extent who's eligible for bail.


Shanghai Subway Surveillance AI Has Database of 2 Billion Faces

#artificialintelligence

The AI algorithm, the name of which can be translated as either Dragon Eye or Dragonfly Eye, was developed by Shanghai-based tech firm Yitu. It works off of China's national database, which consists of all 1.3 billion residents of the Asian nation as well as 500 million more people who have entered the country at some point. Dragon Eye interfaces with the database to detect the faces of individuals. Yitu chief executive and co-founder Zhu Long told the South China Morning Post (SCMP) that the purpose of the algorithm is to fight crime and make the world a safer place. "Let's say that we live in Shanghai, a city of 24 million people.


China's artificial intelligence is catching criminals and advancing health care - Socializing AI

#artificialintelligence

Zhu Long, co-founder and CEO of Yitu Technology, has his identity checked at the company's headquarters in the Hongqiao business district in Shanghai. "Our machines can very easily recognise you among at least 2 billion people in a matter of seconds," says chief executive and Yitu co-founder Zhu Long, "which would have been unbelievable just three years ago." Its platform is also in service with more than 20 provincial public security departments, and is used as part of more than 150 municipal public security systems across the country, and Dragonfly Eye has already proved its worth. On its very first day of operation on the Shanghai Metro, in January, the system identified a wanted man when he entered a station. After matching his face against the database, Dragonfly Eye sent his photo to a policeman, who made an arrest.


Alt-right accuses Amazon's Alexa of liberal political bias

Daily Mail

Smart assistants are designed to tackle a whole host of everyday tasks, but some users are unhappy that this seems to include taking a stand on political issues. Amazon's Alexa has come under fire on social media thanks to the AI-powered speaker's thoughts on a number of hot button topics. Some have branded Alexa a'social justice warrior' because of her responses to questions on subjects ranging from feminism to the Black Lives Matter movement. Smart assistants are designed to tackle a whole host of everyday tasks but some users are unhappy that this seems to include taking a stand on political issues. Amazon's Alexa has come under fire thanks to the AI powered speaker's thoughts on a number of hot button topics The response has been particularly vociferous among the alt-right community on social media.


China unveils Minority Report-style AI security system

Daily Mail

A smart surveillance system that can identify criminals among a database of 2 billion faces within seconds has been revealed in China. The system connects to millions of CCTV cameras and uses artificial intelligence to pick out targets. Known as'Dragonfly Eye', it has already been used in Shanghai to track down hundreds of wanted criminals, reports suggest. A smart surveillance system (pictured) that can scan 2 billion faces within seconds has been revealed in China. The system has been helping Shanghai's police force track down criminals in a city with more than 24 million inhabitants.