Civil Rights & Constitutional Law


When algorithms are racist

The Guardian

Joy Buolamwini is a graduate researcher at the MIT Media Lab and founder of the Algorithmic Justice League – an organisation that aims to challenge the biases in decision-making software. When I was a computer science undergraduate I was working on social robotics – the robots use computer vision to detect the humans they socialise with. I discovered I had a hard time being detected by the robot compared to lighter-skinned people. Thinking about yourself – growing up in Mississippi, a Rhodes Scholar, a Fulbright Fellow and now at MIT – do you wonder that if those admissions decisions had been taken by algorithms you might not have ended up where you are?


Google's Brain Team: 'AIs can be racist and sexist but we can change that'

ZDNet

But as three Google researchers note in a new paper, there currently is no vetted methodology for avoiding discrimination against sensitive attributes in machine learning. Another approach, called "demographic parity", would require a prediction to be uncorrelated with the sensitive attribute, but Hardt argues in the case of predicting medical conditions such as heart failure, it's "neither realistic nor desirable to prevent all correlation between the predicted outcome and group membership". According to Hardt, its methodology not only can measure and prevent discrimination based on sensitive attributes but also help scrutinize predictors. "When implemented, our framework also improves incentives by shifting the cost of poor predictions from the individual to the decision maker, who can respond by investing in improved prediction accuracy," writes Hardt.


If Machines Can Think, Do They Deserve Civil Rights?

#artificialintelligence

To create a desirable future where humans and conscious machines are at peace with one another, treating our AI with respect may be a crucial factor in preventing the apocalypse Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and Bill Gates fear. Like basic human rights, AI rights may include the right to liberty, freedom of expression, and equality before the law. But how will AI rights be different from human rights? The AI rights revolution may be contingent on intelligent machines being conscious, with the capacity to feel that they exist and consequently feel pleasure and pain.


If Machines Can Think, Do They Deserve Civil Rights?

#artificialintelligence

To create a desirable future where humans and conscious machines are at peace with one another, treating our AI with respect may be a crucial factor in preventing the apocalypse Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and Bill Gates fear. Like basic human rights, AI rights may include the right to liberty, freedom of expression, and equality before the law. But how will AI rights be different from human rights? The AI rights revolution may be contingent on intelligent machines being conscious, with the capacity to feel that they exist and consequently feel pleasure and pain.


If Machines Can Think, Do They Deserve Civil Rights?

#artificialintelligence

To create a desirable future where humans and conscious machines are at peace with one another, treating our AI with respect may be a crucial factor in preventing the apocalypse Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and Bill Gates fear. Like basic human rights, AI rights may include the right to liberty, freedom of expression, and equality before the law. But how will AI rights be different from human rights? The AI rights revolution may be contingent on intelligent machines being conscious, with the capacity to feel that they exist and consequently feel pleasure and pain.


If Machines Can Think, Do They Deserve Civil Rights?

#artificialintelligence

To create a desirable future where humans and conscious machines are at peace with one another, treating our AI with respect may be a crucial factor in preventing the apocalypse Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and Bill Gates fear. In his article "A Robot Code of Ethics," McGee suggests that perhaps robots should fear us as much as we fear them, and that we should have legal precautions to protect them. Like basic human rights, AI rights may include the right to liberty, freedom of expression, and equality before the law. Forbes contributor Alex Knapp argues that the very question of AI having civil rights is absurd because any computer-based system is going to be programmed at some level.


If Machines Can Think, Do They Deserve Civil Rights?

#artificialintelligence

If so, when will this AI rights revolution occur, and what will it look like? Exponential growth in neuro-technology coupled with unprecedented advances in AI mean intelligent, conscious machines may be possible. In his article "A Robot Code of Ethics," McGee suggests that perhaps robots should fear us as much as we fear them, and that we should have legal precautions to protect them. Like basic human rights, AI rights may include the right to liberty, freedom of expression, and equality before the law.


If Machines Can Think, Do They Deserve Civil Rights?

#artificialintelligence

If so, when will this AI rights revolution occur, and what will it look like? Exponential growth in neuro-technology coupled with unprecedented advances in AI mean intelligent, conscious machines may be possible. In his article "A Robot Code of Ethics," McGee suggests that perhaps robots should fear us as much as we fear them, and that we should have legal precautions to protect them. Like basic human rights, AI rights may include the right to liberty, freedom of expression, and equality before the law.