Information Technology


This Week's Top Stocks FB, DDD, AMZN, & TWTR Stock Forecasts Quantifying Uncertainty and Bayesian Inference

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The U.S. cotton market has remained stable since its spike in 2011, when China executed its cotton reserving and fiber hoarding plan. It is believed that U.S. cotton demand and price were artificially kept low because there are always worries that China would unexpectedly unleash its cotton stockpile, about half of the global storage. However, U.S. cotton price finally showed a revival in recent days. The ICE July cotton futures closed at 95.21 cents a pound on Tuesday, June 12, the highest level for a front-month future contract in the last 6 years. The revival could be attributed to multiple factors, with an emphasis on the worries about insufficient rain in the cotton-growing areas and the newly issued import quotas from China.


AI Weekly: The growing importance of clear AI ethics policies

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A little over a week after the fervor surrounding Google's involvement in the Department of Defense's Project Maven, an autonomous drone program, showed signs of abating, another machine learning controversy returned to the headlines: local law enforcement deploying Amazon's Rekognition, a computer vision service with facial recognition capabilities. In a letter addressed to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, 19 groups of shareholders expressed concerns that Rekognition's facial recognition capabilities will be misused in ways that "violate [the] civil and human rights" of "people of color, immigrants, and civil society organizations." And they said that it set the stage for sales of the software to foreign governments and authoritarian regimes. Amazon, for its part, said in a statement that it will "suspend … customer's right to use … services [like Rekognition]" if it determines those services are being "abused." It has so far declined, however, to define the bright-line rules that would trigger a suspension.


Analytics Are Empowering Next-Gen Access And Zero Trust Security

Forbes Technology

Employee identities are the new security perimeter of any business. According to the Verizon Mobile Security Index 2018 Report, 89% of organizations are relying on just a single security strategy to keep their mobile networks safe. And with Gartner predicting worldwide security spending reaching $96B this year, up 8% from 2017, it's evident enterprises must adopt a more vigilant, focused strategy for protecting every threat surface and access point of their companies. IT security strategies based on trusted and untrusted domains are being rendered insufficient as hackers camouflage their attacks through compromised, privileged credentials. It's happening so often that eight in ten breaches are now the result of compromised employee identities.


MacBook Pro 13 Vs. Dell XPS 13: Ultimate 13-Inch Laptop Head-To-Head

Forbes Technology

Dell's redesigned XPS 13 (early 2018) The Dell XPS 13 9370 may be the planet's best 13-inch laptop but the MacBook Pro is still enormously popular. Below, I also use my mid-2017 MacBook Pro 15 for reference on features like the Touch Bar.) Summary / tl;dr: The latest XPS 13 (about 2.7 pounds) maintains its small overall size courtesy of a thin display bezel: it's as close as a 13.3-inch laptop can get to the size of a typical 12- or 12.5-inch class laptop. The 2018 redesign also comes loaded with upgrades including improved fiber material in the palmrest, a new keyboard with more tactile feedback, a fingerprint scanner embedded in the power button, faster Windows Hello face recognition, and a higher-resolution 4K touch display on the top-of-the-line model. Display: The Dell XPS 13 has probably the most advanced display assembly on any 13-inch laptop today. An almost-borderless 13.3-inch 4K Ultra HD (3,840-by-2,160) touch display that also makes room for infrared imaging sensors to authenticate and unlock Windows via facial recognition.


AI security cameras coming to stores in Japan, reduce shoplifting by 40 percent

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Now, if a clerk asks to help you, it probably means you've been acting shady. Artificial intelligence continues to seep into our daily lives, touching up photos, developing snacks, and imitating school girls online. Now, AI has been tasked with tackling a crime as old as retail itself: shoplifting. A recent study by telecom giant NTT found that Japanese businesses lose around 400 billion yen (US$3.7B) annually through five-fingered discounts. No store is immune to this larceny, except perhaps anvil shops, and technology has yet to come up with a strong enough solution to effectively combat it, until now.


How Automation Will Affect Your Workforce

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Editor's Note: SHRM has partnered with Harvard Business Review to bring you relevant articles on key HR topics and strategies. Today, executives have to cut through a lot of hype around automation. Leaders need a clear-eyed way to think about how these technologies will specifically affect their organizations. The right question isn't which jobs are going to be replaced, but rather, what work will be redefined, and how? Based on our work with a number of organizations grappling with these issues, we've found that the following four-step approach can help.


TechVisor - Het vizier op de tech industrie

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The possibilities of artificial intelligence are endless. AI helps businesses create tremendous efficiencies through automation, while enhancing an organizations ability to make more effective business decisions. However, it's no surprise that companies are beginning to be held accountable for the outcomes of their AI-based decisions. From the proliferation of fake news to most recently, the deliberate creation of the AI psychopath Norman, we're beginning to understand and experience the potential negative outcomes of AI. While AI, machine learning, and deep learning have been deemed to be'black box' technologies, unable to provide any information or explanation of its actions, this inability to explain AI will no longer be acceptable to consumers, regulators, and other stakeholders.


Software-Centric: The Future of Digital Marketing in Telecommunication - Evolve Digital Labs Marketing Strategy Digital Agency

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To accomplish this task, A.I. systems are necessary to gather the data and present it in a way that's digestible to many different teams within a telecom organization. For telecommunications companies to perfect the customer-centric process and genuinely personalize their messaging and marketing strategies, they need to focus on machine learning systems to aid marketers in getting the brand-to-customer communication right. This is where the successful telecommunication companies have to pivot their focus. Since the beginning, telecom industries have fueled human-to-human communication. Companies like AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint would provide a phone or internet service to consumers or businesses, and everyone would go on their way.


Rebooting AI - postulates

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We are trapped by Turing's definition of intelligence. In his famous formulation Turing confined intelligence as a solution to a verbal game played against humans. This in particular sets intelligence as a (1) solution to a game, and (2) puts human in the judgement position. This definition is extremely deceptive and has not served the field well. Dogs, monkeys, elephants and even rodents are very intelligent creatures but are not verbal and hence would fail the Turing test.


We Need to Save Ignorance From AI - Issue 61: Coordinates - Nautilus

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After the fall of the Berlin Wall, East German citizens were offered the chance to read the files kept on them by the Stasi, the much-feared Communist-era secret police service. To date, it is estimated that only 10 percent have taken the opportunity. In 2007, James Watson, the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, asked that he not be given any information about his APOE gene, one allele of which is a known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Most people tell pollsters that, given the choice, they would prefer not to know the date of their own death--or even the future dates of happy events. Each of these is an example of willful ignorance.