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The Download: Google's stalkerware ban failure, and a bet for climate catastrophe

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According to research by mobile security firm Certo Software and confirmed by MIT Technology Review, Google Search queries related to tracking partners such as a wife or girlfriend commonly return ads for software and services that explicitly offer to spy on other individuals. Stalkerware, also referred to as spyware, is software designed to secretly monitor another person, tracking their location, phone calls, private messages, web searches, and keystrokes. Although Google banned ads promoting stalkerware in August 2020, stalkerware companies are still able to buy ads containing phrases including "app to see spouse's text messages," "see who your girlfriend is texting," and "it's like having their device" against search results such as "read wife's texts app." "We understand that this is not a war between Ukraine and Russia. This is a war of the pure and the light that exists on this earth, and darkness." The problem is that no one can agree how to save it.


Driving successful AI transformations at the enterprise level - For all the latest on all IT Tech like ERP, Cloud, Bot, AI, IoT,M2M, Netsuite, Salesforce

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Chandramauli Chaudhuri leads the Data Science initiatives across Fractal's Tech Media & Telecom vertical in the UK & Europe. He works in close collaboration with senior business stakeholders and CXO teams across some of the leading global enterprises, enabling the development of long-term strategic AI solutions. Being in the field of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning for close to a decade and working across a wide range of industries, his primary area of interest lies in R&D, algorithmic customisation, capability enhancement, and MLOps deployments of solutions. Analytics India Magazine interviewed Chandramauli to gain insights into AI transformation at the enterprise level. Chandramauli: As a business leader driving AI transformation across an organisation, it is critical to understand that Artificial Intelligence is just the means of value realisation and not an end goal by itself.


Startups Apply Artificial Intelligence To Supply Chain Disruptions

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Over the last two years a series of unexpected events has scrambled global supply chains. Coronavirus, war in Ukraine, Brexit and a container ship wedged in the Suez Canal have combined to delay deliveries of everything from bicycles to pet food. In response, a growing group of startups and established logistics firms has created a multi-billion dollar industry applying the latest technology to help businesses minimize the disruption. Interos Inc, Fero Labs, KlearNow Corp and others are using artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge tools so manufacturers and their customers can react more swiftly to supplier snarl-ups, monitor raw material availability and get through the bureaucratic thicket of cross-border trade. The market for new technology services focused on supply chains could be worth more than $20 billion a year in the next five years, analysts told Reuters.


Startups apply artificial intelligence to supply chain disruptions

#artificialintelligence

LONDON, May 3 (Reuters) - Over the last two years a series of unexpected events has scrambled global supply chains. Coronavirus, war in Ukraine, Brexit and a container ship wedged in the Suez Canal have combined to delay deliveries of everything from bicycles to pet food. In response, a growing group of startups and established logistics firms has created a multi-billion dollar industry applying the latest technology to help businesses minimize the disruption. Interos Inc, Fero Labs, KlearNow Corp and others are using artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge tools so manufacturers and their customers can react more swiftly to supplier snarl-ups, monitor raw material availability and get through the bureaucratic thicket of cross-border trade. The market for new technology services focused on supply chains could be worth more than $20 billion a year in the next five years, analysts told Reuters.


Startups apply artificial intelligence to supply chain disruptions

The Japan Times

LONDON – Over the last two years a series of unexpected events has scrambled global supply chains. Coronavirus, war in Ukraine, Brexit and a container ship wedged in the Suez Canal have combined to delay deliveries of everything from bicycles to pet food. In response, a growing group of startups and established logistics firms has created a multibillion dollar industry applying the latest technology to help businesses minimize the disruption. Interos Inc., Fero Labs, KlearNow Corp. and others are using artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge tools so manufacturers and their customers can react more swiftly to supplier snarl-ups, monitor raw material availability and get through the bureaucratic thicket of cross-border trade. The market for new technology services focused on supply chains could be worth more than $20 billion a year in the next five years, analysts told Reuters.


AI in healthcare

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By 2030, AI will get to different wellsprings of information to uncover designs in sickness and help therapy and care. Medical care frameworks will actually want to anticipate a singular gamble of specific illnesses and recommend preventive measures. Simulated intelligence will assist with decreasing sitting tight times for patients and further develop proficiency in clinics and wellbeing frameworks. At this season 10 years earlier, focuses and expert's work environments would flood with incapacitated people fit to be seen; today, clinicians and patients move actually through the structure. Related care has moved toward a reality, driven by long periods of gigantic strain on overall clinical benefits systems without enough gifted clinical specialists to truly zero in on their rapidly creating and developing peoples and forward jumps in solid advancement enabling impacts, for instance, data science and man-made thinking (AI).


Ocado is using an army of 2,000 robots in its East London fulfilment centre

Daily Mail - Science & tech

It may look like a nightmare sequence from a science fiction film, but a network of fast-working robots is now hard at work in East London. British grocery giant Ocado is using an army of robots at its 563,000 square foot warehouse in Erith next to the Thames to gather up items for customer orders. More than 2,000 robots are working there non-stop for 20 hours a day, each picking up to 2 million food items in a shift – far beyond the capability of a human worker. The eight-wheeled robots scoot around a giant grid-like structure called the'Hive', so-called for its honeycomb-like holes that contain inventory. Powered by an algorithm, the robots pick up crates of items to take to a human to put into shopping bags for delivery.


Working from home via Zoom leads to fewer creative ideas than in-person meetings, study finds

Daily Mail - Science & tech

During the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of employees were required to work from home and collaborate virtually using videoconferencing technologies such as Zoom. But a new study suggests this shift away from in-person interactions could have a negative effect on people's ability to brainstorm effectively. Researchers at Columbia University put almost 1,500 people into pairs over either a video call or in-person, and asked them to come up with new product ideas. They found the face-to-face pairs produced more ideas, and more creative ideas, compared to the virtual pairs. However, when selecting which idea to pursue, video call pairs were no less effective.


Should Artificial Intelligence be Regulated to Protect Jobs?

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For over 23 years, Larry Collins worked as a toll collector on the Carquinez Bridge in San Francisco. He loved his job -- every day, he would come to work and greet drivers, provide directions, answer questions, and collect toll fees. Over the years, although the toll price had changed tremendously, his job was always in a stable condition. But, this all changed during March of 2020. In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, Collins was suddenly informed that his tollbooth was getting shut down and replaced by an artificial intelligence-based toll collector machine. Collins was not the lone victim of industrial automation unemployment, just in the Northern California region, 185 other toll booths were also shut down and replaced by technological alternatives (Semuels). As the 21st-century technological advances continue, applications of artificial intelligence are expected to expand exponentially. Slowly but surely, artificial intelligence is automating a multitude of manual jobs, causing widespread unemployment around the world (Peterson). There is clear uncertainty about the future of artificial intelligence. A recent report from the conference on Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection suggested that the European Commission (EU), is strongly "considering the possibility of legislating for Artificial Intelligence". This legislation would explore a number of nuances that come with future artificial intelligence job automation and will consider the implementation of a novel regulatory framework (MacCarthy). On the other hand, organizations such as Deltec, an international financial research institute, are in support of artificial intelligence automation and don't want regulation as it would hinder humanity's ability to research and solve problems in an efficient manner (Trehan). Currently, there has been no clear conclusion to this ongoing debate -- experts have varying opinions but agree that a full-proof solution is direly needed.


Bay Area drone company Zipline starts delivering medicine in Japan

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TOKYO -- Zipline, an American company that specializes in using autonomously flying drones to deliver medical supplies, has taken off in Japan. Other parts of Japan may follow, including urban areas, although the biggest needs tend to be in isolated rural areas. Zipline, founded six years ago, already is in service in the U.S., where it has partnered with Walmart Inc. to deliver other products at the retail chain as well as drugs. It is also delivering medical goods in Ghana and Rwanda. Its takeoff in Japan is in partnership with Toyota Tsusho, a group company of Japan's top automaker Toyota Motor Corp. "You can totally transform the way that you react to pandemics, treat patients and do things like home health care delivery," Zipline Chief Executive Keller Rinaudo told The Associated Press.