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Robots are joining the fight against coronavirus in India

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Bangalore-based Invento Robotics has designed three robots to carry out tasks ranging from disinfecting surfaces to answering patient questions and enabling video consultations with doctors. Of the eight the company has so far deployed, the most popular model is Mitra, which means friend in Hindi and costs around $10,000. Using facial-recognition technology, the robot can recall the names and faces of patients it has interacted with. Mitra can roam around a hospital independently, helping patients connect with family and doctors via its cameras and a video screen attached to its chest."Mitra "It may sound ironic but we are using robots to bring humanity to hospitals," he tells CNN Business. Yatharth Hospital in the city of Noida, northern India, has deployed two Mitra robots -- one at its entrance to screen patients for coronavirus symptoms and the other in the intensive care unit."Inside


Use of AI in healthcare can solve the inequality of access

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MY 85-year-old uncle was hospitalised due to ageing issues at a private hospital in Kolkata, India. In the intensive care unit, he contracted Covid-19 from another patient whose infection the hospital was not even aware of. It took the hospital days to figure out that many of its ICU patients, doctors and other professionals were already infected. The pandemic shows us the inequality of healthcare access. This collective global experience will invariably lead to demands of massive upscaling of healthcare.


Large expert-curated database for benchmarking document similarity detection in biomedical literature search

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Document recommendation systems for locating relevant literature have mostly relied on methods developed a decade ago. This is largely due to the lack of a large offline gold-standard benchmark of relevant documents that cover a variety of research fields such that newly developed literature search techniques can be compared, improved and translated into practice. To overcome this bottleneck, we have established the RElevant LIterature SearcH consortium consisting of more than 1500 scientists from 84 countries, who have collectively annotated the relevance of over 180 000 PubMed-listed articles with regard to their respective seed (input) article/s. The majority of annotations were contributed by highly experienced, original authors of the seed articles. The collected data cover 76% of all unique PubMed Medical Subject Headings descriptors. No systematic biases were observed across different experience levels, research fields or time spent on annotations.


India's Health Challenges and Would-Be Solutions – From Human to Artificial Intelligence - Inside Villgro

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By 2030, India's population of people age 60 or older is projected to grow by 64 percent. Also by 2030, India's urban areas are expected to more than double their current population levels. Additionally, factors such as an increase in income levels, increases in health care insurance penetration, increases in private and public health care expenditure and rising consumer awareness will shape the future of the health care sector in India for the coming decades. Total spending on health care has increased at double-digit rates and accounted for 4 percent of GDP in 2013. However, government spending still remains low at 1.3 percent of GDP, making private expenditures as high as 2.7 percent of GDP in 2013.


India's Health Challenges and Would-Be Solutions – From Human to Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

By 2030, India's population of people age 60 or older is projected to grow by 64 percent. Also by 2030, India's urban areas are expected to more than double their current population levels. Additionally, factors such as an increase in income levels, increases in health care insurance penetration, increases in private and public health care expenditure and rising consumer awareness will shape the future of the health care sector in India for the coming decades. Total spending on health care has increased at double-digit rates and accounted for 4 percent of GDP in 2013. However, government spending still remains low at 1.3 percent of GDP, making private expenditures as high as 2.7 percent of GDP in 2013.