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Cranberries could improve memory and ward off dementia

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Eating a small bowl of cranberries every day could help ward off dementia, research suggested today. Scientists tested giving healthy older adults the equivalent of 100g of the fruit each day. Volunteers who ate a powdered version of the fruit -- which has a notoriously bitter taste -- were found to have a better memory recall after 12 weeks. And MRI scans showed those eating cranberries had better blood flow to important parts of the brain. People given cranberries also had 9 per cent lower bad cholesterol levels, according to the University of East Anglia study.



Royal Papworth leads AI study into heart valve disease

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Royal Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust is leading a study into the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to diagnose heart valve disease. Royal Papworth is working with the University of Cambridge on the research, which hopes to develop a screening tool powered by AI to help diagnose the disease before symptoms are first displayed. The research will involve thousands of patients having four heart recordings that are collected via a Bluetooth stethoscope, in addition to the conventional route of an echocardiogram. Recordings will be uploaded to a machine-learning programme, so that the University of Cambridge can build an audio database of the noises associated with heart valve diseases. Ultimately, the research aims to create an artificially intelligent stethoscope that can analyse heart murmurs to provide either a diagnosis or determine if further investigation is needed.


Volta Medical VX1 AI Software to be Featured at Heart Rhythm 2022

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MARSEILLE, France and PROVIDENCE, R.I., April 27, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Volta Medical, a pioneering medtech startup advancing novel artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms to treat cardiac arrhythmias, today announced it will participate at Heart Rhythm 2022, where Volta VX1 digital AI companion technology will be featured in several venues, including a poster session, podium presentation, Rhythm Theater program and the Volta exhibit booth. VX1 is a machine and deep learning-based algorithm designed to assist operators in the real-time manual annotation of 3D anatomical and electrical maps of the human atria during atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial tachycardia. It is the first FDA cleared AI-based tool in interventional cardiac electrophysiology (EP). On Friday, April 29, VX1 will be highlighted in two scientific sessions: session DH-202, "Machine Learning Applications for Arrhythmia Detection and Treatment" from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Volta's Rhythm Theater presentation, "Can AI Solve the Persistent AF Paradigm?," will be held Saturday, April 30 from 10:00-11:00 a.m.


NHS Introduces A New AI-Based Technology That Can Detect Heart Disease At Record Speed And With 40 Percent Higher Accuracy

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The NHS is now employing a cutting-edge AI program that can diagnose heart illness in just 20 SECONDS. While the patient is in the scanner, the computer tool, which resembles human ability but with more precision and speed, can analyze cardiac MRI data in 20 seconds. According to the British Heart Foundation (BHF), which has supported research into the technology, this is significantly faster than a doctor physically examining the pictures following an MRI scan, which may take up to 13 minutes. The technology identifies heart structure and function changes with 40% greater accuracy and retrieves 40% more information than a human can. According to the new research, the approach was more accurate at analyzing MRIs than the work of three specialists.


How drones delivering defibrillators could save lives in Britain

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Earlier this year, a 71-year-old man in the Swedish city of Trollhattan was shovelling snow outside his house when he suffered a cardiac arrest -- his heart suddenly stopped beating. A passing doctor rushed to help and began performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to keep blood and oxygen flowing to his brain and other vital organs, while a bystander called for an ambulance. It was a race against time. With no pulse, the man's heart needed to be shocked back into life using a defibrillator. The drone took just three minutes to arrive, reaching the patient well ahead of paramedics.


Heart valve disease research

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A research study being led by Royal Papworth Hospital and the University of Cambridge is hoping to use artificial intelligence to help diagnose heart valve diseases earlier. Valvular heart disease (VHD) affects nearly two million people in the UK with this number expected to double by 2040. About half of those affected by VHD are unaware of their condition, because symptoms often do not develop until the disease has become severe. Cardiovascular Acoustics and an Intelligent Stethoscope (CAIS) is a clinical study aimed at creating a first-of-its-kind screening tool which could be used to diagnose valve disease before symptoms emerge. Almost 1,200 patients with suspected heart valve disease or congenital heart disease have so far signed up to the study across five NHS hospital sites.


Artificial intelligence tool may help predict heart attacks: Cedars-Sinai scientists developed an AI algorithm to measure coronary plaque buildup

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The tool, described in The Lancet Digital Health, accurately predicted which patients would experience a heart attack in five years based on the amount and composition of plaque in arteries that supply blood to the heart. Plaque buildup can cause arteries to narrow, which makes it difficult for blood to get to the heart, increasing the likelihood of a heart attack. A medical test called a coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) takes 3D images of the heart and arteries and can give doctors an estimate of how much a patient's arteries have narrowed. Until now, however, there has not been a simple, automated and rapid way to measure the plaque visible in the CTA images. "Coronary plaque is often not measured because there is not a fully automated way to do it," said Damini Dey, PhD, director of the quantitative image analysis lab in the Biomedical Imaging Research Institute at Cedars-Sinai and senior author of the study.


AI-enabled tool may make it easier to predict heart attack risk

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Investigators from Cedars-Sinai have created an artificial intelligence-enabled tool that may make it easier to predict if a person will have a heart attack. The tool, described in The Lancet Digital Health, accurately predicted which patients would experience a heart attack in five years based on the amount and composition of plaque in arteries that supply blood to the heart. Plaque buildup can cause arteries to narrow, which makes it difficult for blood to get to the heart, increasing the likelihood of a heart attack. A medical test called a coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) takes 3D images of the heart and arteries and can give doctors an estimate of how much a patient's arteries have narrowed. Until now, however, there has not been a simple, automated and rapid way to measure the plaque visible in the CTA images.


Artificial intelligence tool may help predict heart attacks

#artificialintelligence

Investigators from Cedars-Sinai have created an artificial intelligence-enabled tool that may make it easier to predict if a person will have a heart attack. The tool, described in The Lancet Digital Health, accurately predicted which patients would experience a heart attack in five years based on the amount and composition of plaque in arteries that supply blood to the heart. Plaque buildup can cause arteries to narrow, which makes it difficult for blood to get to the heart, increasing the likelihood of a heart attack. A medical test called a coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) takes 3-D images of the heart and arteries and can give doctors an estimate of how much a patient's arteries have narrowed. Until now, however, there has not been a simple, automated and rapid way to measure the plaque visible in the CTA images.